.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Leadership opportunities abound for 4-Hers

    Our young people are the future leaders and decision makers of the nation. 4-H offers its members prime opportunities to explore and engage in leadership roles. By participating in a leadership role, young people can develop critical thinking, communication and life skills that will aid them in making future decisions.

    Many leadership experiences are geared toward older youth, but younger youth also have the opportunity to become leaders early in their 4-H career.

  • Look out for fall armyworm

    There have been reports of extensive fall armyworm damage in several counties in Kentucky. Some have been catastrophic, while most thus far are just large enough to be noticed. Reports have been from home lawns, pastures, and grass/alfalfa fields. Growers should be aware of potential problems in at risk crops.

  • A trip to forget: Broken rod led to broken spirits

    Fishing is relaxing.

    That’s what they tell you when you don’t fish. It isn’t until you get out on the water with someone that you realize just how distinctly not relaxing it really is.

    When my friend offered to take me fishing at his family’s farm over the weekend, I thought, “Oh, this’ll be fun.” I was right, but not for the reasons I’d expected.

  • Where have the workers gone?

    Swimming against a strong current is an apt comparison for the plight of most workers today.

    A recent study by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy illustrates just how hard it has become not only for the unemployed, but even for those who get up every day and go to work.

    “The State of Working Kentucky 2014” reported that between 2001 and 2013, Kentucky workers’ median wages fell 8 percent after adjusting for inflation.

    And those are the workers who still have jobs.

  • I-65 contracts awarded

    Kentucky has taken a significant step toward realizing a long-held goal of a six-lane Interstate 65 from the Ohio River to the Tennessee line.

    The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet awarded a $138.48 million contract on Wednesday to rebuild 17 miles of the interstate in Hart, LaRue and Hardin counties, widening it to six lanes – three in each direction – from four lanes.

    The project area stretches from mile point 64.9 in Hart County, near Munfordville, through LaRue County to mile point 82.2 in Hardin County, near Sonora.

  • CU ranked fourth in affordability

    Campbellsville University has been ranked fourth among the top 50 most affordable Christian colleges in the United States by the independent researchers of Christian Universities Online.

    Christian Universities Online is an independent online resource that researches and ranks Christian higher education in the United States. In addition, it provides reviews, information about Christian scholarships and financial aid, along with other resources for students.

  • Candidate Roy Ray drops out of magistrate race

    Republican Stanley “Roy” Ray withdrew Monday from the 3rd District Magistrate race.

    LaRue County Clerk Linda Carter said Ray’s name would remain on the ballots – which have already been printed.

    A notice of his withdrawal will be posted at each precinct on Election Day.

    Ray is the second candidate to withdraw from the race. Earl Thomas Riggs, a Democrat, withdrew Jan. 29.

    Incumbent Ronald Dale Nunn, a Democrat, faces no other opposition. 

  • PHOTO: Biking on a mission
  • Band of Hawks tops at South Central Marching Band Classic

    The LaRue County Band of Hawks competed Saturday in the South Central Kentucky Marching Band Classic in Glasgow.

    LaRue County came out on top in Class AAA-1, in addition to earning the highest music performance and music effect scores.

  • Education given an early KHIC

    Since it first appeared in print in “The Lady’s Magazine” for 1818, the phrase “The Three R’s” has been in vogue for what is to be learned in the early years of elementary school – readin’, (w)ritin’, and (a)rithmetic.

    When the phrase was coined, most students began school in the first grade at about the age of 6. But, the explosion of knowledge over the two centuries since the phrase’s inception has mandated students get an earlier start on their education.