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Education

  • WKU’s 2018 Dean’s and Presidential List

    The following Western Kentucky University students from the LaRue County area were named to the Dean’s and President’s lists for the spring 2018 semester. Full-time undergraduate students with a semester grade-point average of 3.4 to 3.79 are named to the Dean’s List. Students with a GPA of 3.8 to 4.0 are named to the President’s List. Their names are marked with an asterisk (*).

  • Newby Graduates from LWC

    Lorren Newby of Magnolia recently graduated from Lindsey Wilson College with a bachelor of science degree in nursing.

    Newby was among 218 students who received undergraduate or graduate degrees at the college’s 107th commencement ceremony on May 12, 2018 in Biggers Sports Center at LWC.

  • LCMS Honor Roll

    With an all A Honor Roll, in sixth grade: Kayleigh Adkins, Alivia Akers, Emily Albertson, Lenayah Andrews, Matthew Ball, Shalee Belcher, Austin Blackburn, Hannah Boggs, Cutter Boley, Aiden Brown, Shelby Burris, Kairi Butler, Patrick Butterworth, Donavin Cecil, Elizabeth Cecil, Allie Cecil, Madison Chaudoin, Carson Childress, Jacob Clark, Hannah Compton, Caden Davis, Nathaniel Faulkner, William Faulkner, Gabriel Fortier, Lydia Goode, Carlie Graham, Brock Gross, Laila Gross, Yasmeen Hamada, Aiden Hawkins, Logan Hawkins, Jake Heady.

  • Camp Invention is Next Month

    Celebrating its tenth year this summer, Camp Invention in LaRue County, which runs 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. July 9-13 at Abraham Lincoln Elementary School, leads the state in the number of campers enrolled with 125 plus six on a waiting list.

    “Something usually happens before camp to keep someone from coming, so one or two may get in,” noted Kathy Ross, retired LaRue County educator who has been director the entire time the district has hosted the camp. “The five people on the wait list last year were some of the first who signed up this year.”

  • The importance of technology for LCS

    There’s hardly any aspect related to schools today that isn’t in some way connected to technology.

    Attendance and finance data, assessment, various reports, classwork, instructional aids—all input and receive data through technology. That amount of information makes it imperative that the process runs smoothly and can be quickly repaired when it doesn’t.

    To do this, LaRue County Schools has a technology staff dedicated to keeping the pathways to and from the central data center located in the high school up and running.

  • Speech and Debate Team Recognition
  • Cub Scouts First Responder Class
  • 4-H Fair projects

     The LaRue County Fair is an excellent opportunity for youth to showcase their talents.  Numerous 4-H classes are offered.  Categories include:  arts and crafts, photography, foods, houseplants, electric, woodworking, entomology, honey, forestry, geology, sewing, knitting, crocheting, breads, dairy foods, food preservation and home environment. 

    A complete list of 4-H classes is included in the Fair Catalog.  Stop by the Extension Office if you need a copy of the catalog or if you have questions about entry requirements. 

  • Flanders Earns Junior Bronze and Silver

    Kalli Flanders, a senior at LaRue County High School, has earned the National Junior Angus Association’s (NJAA) Bronze and Silver awards, according to Jaclyn Upperman, education and events director of the American Angus Association in Saint Joseph, Mo.

  • Kingdom Kids visit rock dairy farm