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Agriculture

  • No Market for Milk

    More than 100 dairy farmers, around 20 of them from Kentucky including Gary Rock from LaRue County, recently received a letter stating they would no longer have a market for their product come May 31.

    Dean Foods, a Dallas Texas based food company, sent the letter to independent producers in Kentucky, Ohio, Tennessee, Indiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Pennsylvania and New York, dated Feb. 26, according to numerous reports. In the letter, Dean’s terminates contracts with the producers and gives two reasons for the “difficult decision.”

  • Farm calendar - March 7, 2018

    Farmers Market Voucher Training and Planning

  • Benefits to grazing novel endophyte tall fescue

     Spring is a time of renewal and rejuvenation, and pastures are no exception. If you plan to renovate a field this year, consider replacing your existing stand with a novel endophyte tall fescue variety.

    Novel endophyte tall fescue varieties have been on the market for about 20 years. Recently, the University of Kentucky released a novel endophyte tall fescue variety, Lacefield MaxQ II. It was available to producers in 2017 and is expected to be more widely available this fall.

  • LaRue Co. Farm Bureau celebrates Food Check-Out Week

    The cost of food in America remains affordable. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, American consumers spend, on average, just over 10 percent of their disposable income for food. That means the average household will have earned enough disposable income - that portion of income available for spending or saving - to pay for it’s annual food supply in about seven weeks, said Kentucky Farm Bureau president Mark Haney.

  • Farm calendar - February 28, 2018

    PBPT and Pesticide Training:

    A Producer Best Practice Training is scheduled at 5 p.m. for March 6 at the LaRue County Extension Office. This training replaces the former GAP training for vegetable producers. This will be the last one offered this season. IImmediately following this training will be a Private Pesticide Applicator Training that is designed more for horticulture practices.

     

    Home Based Micro Processor Workshop:

  • AgrAbility keeps farmers working

     Accidents, illness and other problems can restrict farmers from working and threaten their livelihood. Kentucky AgrAbility’s mission is to keep farmers working regardless of their limitations.

  • Farm calendar - February 21, 2018

    Beef Quality and Care Assurance training

    BQCA (formerly known as BQA) training will take place at the LaRue County Extension office at 9 a.m. on Friday, February 23. This new program is a combination of the Beef Quality Assurance program and the Cattle Handling and Care Certification program. Recertification is required every 3 years. The cost is $5 and must be paid by check, NO CASH PLEASE.

    Extension Leadership Banquet

  • Routine tractor maintenance

    Don’t let the maintenance of your tractor go by the wayside when you get busy. There is a tendency to put maintenance on the back burner as spring and summer field activities get into full swing. Often when we do think about maintenance, it is the implement we think about, and we ignore the tractor.

  • Farm calendar - February 14, 2018

    Beef Quality and Care Assurance training

    BQCA (formerly known as BQA) training will take place at the LaRue County Extension office at 9 a.m. on Friday, February 23. This new program is a combination of the Beef Quality Assurance program and the Cattle Handling and Care Certification program. Recertification is required every 3 years. The cost is $5 and must be paid by check, NO CASH PLEASE.

  • Establishment and first-year management of tall fescue

    Tall fescue, specifically Kentucky 31, is a cool-season grass that is widely grown throughout Kentucky and the eastern United States, because it is resistant to many unfavorable conditions including drought tolerance and insect resistance. However, the very reason for its resiliency is also its Achilles heel. It contains a harmful fungal endophyte that causes fescue toxicosis in cattle and horses. Affected animals get sick, have reduced weight gains, reproductive problems and other issues.