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Agriculture

  • Farm calendar - February 21, 2018

    Beef Quality and Care Assurance training

    BQCA (formerly known as BQA) training will take place at the LaRue County Extension office at 9 a.m. on Friday, February 23. This new program is a combination of the Beef Quality Assurance program and the Cattle Handling and Care Certification program. Recertification is required every 3 years. The cost is $5 and must be paid by check, NO CASH PLEASE.

    Extension Leadership Banquet

  • Routine tractor maintenance

    Don’t let the maintenance of your tractor go by the wayside when you get busy. There is a tendency to put maintenance on the back burner as spring and summer field activities get into full swing. Often when we do think about maintenance, it is the implement we think about, and we ignore the tractor.

  • Farm calendar - February 14, 2018

    Beef Quality and Care Assurance training

    BQCA (formerly known as BQA) training will take place at the LaRue County Extension office at 9 a.m. on Friday, February 23. This new program is a combination of the Beef Quality Assurance program and the Cattle Handling and Care Certification program. Recertification is required every 3 years. The cost is $5 and must be paid by check, NO CASH PLEASE.

  • Establishment and first-year management of tall fescue

    Tall fescue, specifically Kentucky 31, is a cool-season grass that is widely grown throughout Kentucky and the eastern United States, because it is resistant to many unfavorable conditions including drought tolerance and insect resistance. However, the very reason for its resiliency is also its Achilles heel. It contains a harmful fungal endophyte that causes fescue toxicosis in cattle and horses. Affected animals get sick, have reduced weight gains, reproductive problems and other issues.

  • Farm calendar - February 7, 2018

    Dicamba Specific Training

  • Controlling Buttercups in Pastures

    One of the signs that spring has arrived is when the yellow flowers of buttercup begin to appear, but it’s during the winter months that the vegetative growth of buttercup takes place. As a cool season weed, this plant often flourishes in over grazed pasture fields with poor stands of desirable forages. In fact, many fields that have dense buttercup populations are fields heavily grazed by animals during the fall through the early spring months.

  • Reduce stress with good record keeping

    Record keeping may not be every farmer’s favorite activity, and probably not the reason someone chooses farming as a career. With time, patience and a commitment to get it done, it can make your financial life a lot less stressful.

    Record keeping doesn’t have to be difficult. It’s a way to keep track of things about your operation that will help you make better long-term decisions. You can use a ledger book or a computer—whatever helps you maintain consistency. Software programs can make your data more meaningful.

  • Farm calendar - January 24, 2018

    Hardin/LaRue winter grain workshop

    Hardin and LaRue County Cooperative Extension programs have teamed up to host a regional Winter Grain Workshop. The workshop will be held from 8-11:30 a.m. on January 24 at the Hardin County offices located at 201 Peterson Drive in Elizabethtown, and will feature four speakers covering multiple topics of importance to grain farming. The meeting has been approved for CCA and CEU hours. For more information or to RSVP, please contact the LaRue County Office at 270-358-3401.

    Produce Best Practice Training

  • Reed passes resolution in support of farmers

    The Kentucky House of Representatives has passed a resolution, sponsored by Representative Brandon Reed of Hodgenville, urging the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to issue more permits allowing farmers to control threatening birds.

    Specifically, the resolution calls on more Kentucky Farm Bureau-administered sub-permits to be issued, allowing Kentucky farmers to legally eliminate black vultures. Currently, many farmers are unable to adequately protect their livestock, as the permit application and distribution process is complicated.

  • Don’t be a victim Radon gas is dangerous

    Radon is the number one cause of lung cancer after smoking. It annually kills more than 21,000 Americans and accounts for about 12 percent of all cancer deaths. But you don’t have to be a victim.