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Agriculture

  • Renovating pastures a good idea

    In last week’s column we looked at some reasons to renovate pastures (seed legume such as clover into existing grass stand). Let’s look at some more reasons for this practice.

    Renovating pastures reduces nitrogen fertilizer expenses that typically account for 20 to 40 percent of the cost of producing forages from grasses. Typically, depending on the cost of nitrogen fertilizer, legumes can put from $18 to $100 or more worth of nitrogen into the soil. This more than offsets the cost of renovation.

  • Book describes invasive plant life

    The USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station is distributing free copies of a new guide, titled “A Management Guide for Invasive Plants in Southern Forests,” that gives homeowners, gardeners, land managers and others information on controlling and removing invasive plants in the South.

  • Grassland Reserve Program applications being taken

    Natural Resources Conservation Service in Kentucky is accepting applications for the Grassland Reserve Program. Although GRP applications are continually accepted, the application ranking cutoff date for 2011 is March 31. Applications received after March 31, 2011 will be deferred until the next ranking cycle.

    The Grassland Reserve Program is a voluntary program offering landowners and operators the opportunity to protect grazing uses and related conservation values by conserving and restoring grassland resources. 

  • Cost share funding available through Conservation Office

    The LaRue County Conservation District will accept requests for cost share funding under the Kentucky Soil Erosion and Water Quality Cost Share Program through Feb. 28, 2011.           

  • BARNYARD TALES: Stiles Ford Road barn is 100-plus years old

    Nancy Bell Raine was born on a farm on Stiles Ford Road. Her father, George Bell, bought the farm from S.C. Cessna on April 2, 1909. It is now owned by Eugene Allen.

    Nancy thinks the old barn that is still on the property was there when her father purchased the farm. If so, it is more than 100 years old.

    The barn is somewhat unique because of the drive-in loft. Allen said, in years past, he has backed his wagon loaded with bales of hay into the loft. That beat hoisting the hay up to the loft with the wagon parked on the ground.

  • Red clover a good option for pasture

    Renovating pastures and hay fields to renew grass productivity is one of the most important things LaRue County farmers can do to improve the grassland grazing and hay land in the county. Pasture and other forage lands in LaRue County feed the county's 28,000 head of cattle and calves in addition to the other ruminant livestock and horses. Believe it or not, pasture renovation time will soon be here.

  • National Issues Forum to be held in Campbellsville

    The University of Kentucky’s Cooperative Extension Service will host a National Issues Forum 10 a.m. Feb. 7 in Campbellsville.

    NIF is a result of a partnership between the Kettering Foundation and the National Issues Forums Institute. The purpose is to use the comments from the Forums as a method to communicate and inform national policy makers. 

  • 74-year-old farmer puts out 6,000 pounds of leaf

    James Warren has been a part of burley tobacco farm production since before he was a teenager.

    Now, at 74 years old, he still raises 6,000 pounds of the leaf on his farm off Bennett Road, but he believes the tobacco companies will eventually snuff out small farm production in deference to the mega-crop producers, some of whom grow hundreds of thousands of pounds per year.

    “They’re docking us a nickel a bale when we sell our tobacco in small bales,” Warren said. “The bigger bales mean less labor at the receiving station.”

  • CAIP offers investment potential to farmers

    LaRue County has been allocated $135,000 for the County Agricultural Investment Program.  The program applicant is the LaRue County Beef Cattle Association and the grant administrator is Dyan Puckett.

    Producer grant applications will be accepted for a two-week period, Jan. 26-Feb. 9 at the LaRue County Cooperative Extension Service, 807 Old Elizabethtown Road in Hodgenville. The deadline for returning grant applications is 4:30 p.m.  Wednesday, Feb. 9. Office hours are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.

  • 4H Rabbit Club

    4-H Rabbit Club members participated in a Skillathon after the Dec. 28 meeting.  From left, Benjamin Lope, Holden Madriaga, Caitlin Aubrey, Sierra Mullins, Rachel Lope, Michaela Rock, Hallie Madriaga and Sarah Lope.