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Agriculture

  • Enjoy Kentucky’s fall color

    If you’ve been waiting all year to see beautiful fall colors in Kentucky, it is almost time. Mid October is the beginning of the brilliant fall tree color show in Kentucky.  Actually, these brilliant colors have been there all along; they’ve been masked by a cloak of chlorophylls, green pigments vital to a tree’s food-making process.

  • Feeding America plans LaRue food distribution

    Feeding America, Kentucky’s Heartland (FAKH) will distribute monthly USDA commodity foods to LaRue County residents on Wednesday, October 24 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. at Hodgenville United Methodist Church on 825 Tonieville Road in Hodgenville.

    FAKH will distribute fresh produce and other grocery items to help provide hunger relief assistance to individuals, families, and seniors who are residents of LaRue County. All residents of LaRue County are eligible to receive the commodities.

  • Farm Calendars

    4-H Calendar

    4-H Enrollment

    LaRue County 4-H members will need to complete a new enrollment form for the 2018-2019 program year.  New forms are now available at the LaRue County Extension Office.  Call 270-358-3401 for more information.

    4-H Cloverbuds

    4-H Cloverbuds will meet from 3:30 to 4:45 p.m. on Tuesday, October 16 at the Extension Office.  The cloverbud program is for youth ages 5-8 years old or K-3rd grades.

    4-H shooting sports club

  • Do your horses have enough hay?

    With winter just around the corner, and the 2018 hay season fixing to wrap up, hopefully horse owners have secured sufficient hay supplies. How do you estimate the amount of hay you will need? If you have mature horses at maintenance level, you would want to feed a mainly forage diet.

    The estimate would be similar to a 1,100-pound horse eating 2 percent of its body weight. That equals 22 pounds of hay per day. Feeding for 120 days, December through March would equal 1.3 tons of hay per horse.

  • October is Farm to School Month

    Serving local foods in Kentucky schools benefits the entire community, Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said in proclaiming October as Farm to School Month in Kentucky.

    “Eating healthy local foods helps Kentucky kids do their best,” Commissioner Quarles said. “At the same time, when schools buy local, farmers and food businesses increase their sales, and that boosts the local economy. During Farm to School Month, let’s celebrate our past success and commit to put more local foods on the plates of Kentucky school children in the future.”

  • Southern States to help animals affected by Hurricane Florence

    Farm Supply Retailer Launches Feed It Forward and Puppy Paw Donation Drives

    Local farm supply retailer Southern States Cooperative is raising funds in their stores for animals in the areas affected by Hurricane Florence.

    The company is partnering with feed company Nutrena and its Feed It Forward program to collect financial donations in stores that the company will use to purchase and ship animal feed to the areas affected by Florence.

  • Apple harvest basics

    Fall is a busy time for apple growers. Ripening times vary from year to year depending on the weather. If apples have coddling moth damage, they will drop up to two weeks before the crop is ripe.

    The best and most time-tested method of judging when to pick fruit is the taste method. When enough starch has been converted to sugar and the flavor is developed, the fruit is ready to eat. Fruit continues to ripen in cold storage, so pick fruit before it is ripe if you want to store it.

  • Fall fertilizer applications

    You may be wondering if it’s necessary and economical to apply fertilizer to your pastures and hay grounds this fall.

  • Fall is a great time to sample soil

    If you think spring is the best time to take soil samples, you might want to rethink that. Fall is actually the optimum time to take soil samples for fertility analyses.

  • Crop Insurance Helps Preserve Farming for Future Generations

    By: Jeremy Hinton

    Farming is a unique profession in so many ways. First, it is more like a calling — to be part of God’s gifts here, and a steward of these gifts. To follow a crop from seed to harvest, or to see an animal born and grow to maturity — that’s a lot of the reason we do what we do.