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ELECTION: McConnell, Guthrie win state - and LaRue

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Kentucky Press News Service

 The Republican Party continues to dominate Kentucky's representation in Congress, retaining seven of the state's eight seats in the 2014 general election.

U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell (R) held on to his seat with a win over Alison Lundergan Grimes (D) in the 2014 general election. The next election for Kentucky's other U.S. Senator Rand Paul (R), who assumed office in 2011, is in 2016.

In LaRue County, McConnell took 62.56 percent of the votes cast.

Republican candidates are still in five of Kentucky's six seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, as all six incumbents retained their posts in the 2014 general election.

The 1st Congressional District is held by incumbent Ed Whitfield (R), who defeated Charles Kendall Hatchett (D) in the general election on Nov. 4, with 73 percent of the vote. He ran unopposed in the primary election. He won re-election in 2012 with almost 70 percent of the vote.

In the 2nd Congressional District, incumbent Brett Guthrie (R), who was first elected in 2008, defeated challenger Ron Leach (D) in the general election with 69 percent of the vote. He won re-election with 60 percent of the vote in 2012. Both candidates ran unopposed in the primary.

Guthriereceived 71 percent of the votes cast in LaRue County.

Kentucky's 3rd Congressional District is the one of the state's six districts with Democratic incumbent John Yarmuth (D), who was first elected in 2006, defeated challenger Michael Macfarlane (R) in the general election with better than 60 percent of the vote. He won re-election in 2012 with 64 percent of the total vote.

Incumbent Thomas Massie (R), who was first elected in 2012, held on to the 4th Congressional District with 68 percent of the vote by defeating challenger Peter Newberry (D). He ran unopposed in the Republican primary for the nomination.

Kentucky's longest serving representative, incumbent Hal Rogers (R), held on to his seat in the 5th Congressional District. Rogers (R), who was first elected in 1980, defeated challenger Kenneth Stepp (D) in the general election with 78 percent of the vote.

The 6th Congressional District race saw the closest margins of all six district races.

Incumbent Andy Barr (R), who was first elected in 2012, defeated challenger Elisabeth Jensen (D) with 53 percent of the vote. He defeated Democratic incumbent Ben Chandler in the general election to win the seat.

Editor Linda Ireland contributed to this story.