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Opinion

  • We are bombarded by reports, in person and in the media, about hard things happening to people. Sometimes the hard events come to individuals and at other times to groups of us.

  • We would like to offer additional information about the gas pricing story from last week. Several people have asked about the city purchasing gas from a convenient store rather than Bault Oil.

    The City of Hodgenville does not have a contract with Bault Oil Company. A contract has never existed with the city for fuel or oil purchases.

    Rickey Shelton

    Bault Oil Company

     

  • Several years ago, James Dobson published a book titled “When God Doesn’t Make Sense” and we all can quote the phrase “God works in mysterious ways.” It feels like that both of those fit perfectly well for my family right now. You see, after eight years of serving as pastor at South Fork Baptist Church, God has changed our assignment and my family and I will be moving in about a week to First Baptist Church, East Bernstadt. For us it is a return home but it is not a move without sadness.

  • It is a typical scene in our office.

    A person – generally irate – although sometimes simply confused – walks through the door, picks up a paper from the stand and slaps it on the counter.

    Wait – I take that back. Sometimes they are angry and confused.

    Sometimes they shake the paper.

    Other times, they turn a few pages and jab a finger at an article.

    “Who wrote this?” they demand.

    Sometimes they add a few choice words.

  • Wonderful things happen when you turn 50.

    For instance, family members sneak around and put really funny ads in the newspaper letting everyone know you are now half a century old.

    On the other end of the spectrum is your annual doctor’s visit when he notices your birthday approaching and learns that your family has a history of colon cancer.

    “Time for a colonoscopy.”

  • Our sincere appreciation goes to the Hodgenville, Buffalo and Magnolia Fire Departments for their tenacious effort and unselfish work they gave to save the surrounding property when our barn was destroyed by fire June 17.

    These wonderful groups of people exhibit their valuable importance when disaster is experienced by people of LaRue County.

    Nile and Ruth Riddle

     

  • “Root canals get a bad rap.”

  • “Root canals get a bad rap.”

  • “Root canals get a bad rap.”

  • During the last few years, I have wished more and more that I had written down all the stories my mom and dad told me when I was growing up.

    No matter how hard I try to remember, some of those details have slipped away. But every now and then, something will jolt a memory – like the jolt you get when the rickety bus you’re riding in hits a pothole.

    Two weeks ago, I had a chance to re-visit the story of how my parents met 60 years ago – on a bus bound for Fort Knox.

  • The Buffalo School Apartments development is scheduled to begin very soon. The LaRue County Economic Development office working with Lexington based AU Associates and RHDI plan to demonstrate how preservation and reuse of historic buildings helps the community preserve its unique heritage, creates jobs putting people to work locally and encourages the preservation of traditional building skills. The local Board of Education also played a major role in the partnership.

  • I am Matt Hanson’s aunt from Michigan and I am sad to hear that this community is arguing over whether a park should be named after my nephew.

    (Editor’s note: Lance Cpl. Matthias Hanson died of combat-related injury in Afghanistan in February.)

    Until Matt’s death, I didn’t understand what all military service men, women and their families signify until now. I took my freedom for granted and I am sorry for the lack of respect I showed. All military deserve to be called “heroes” for the commitments they make to protect our country.

  • Throughout our combined 13 years of educational experiences working with children in Taylor County we have become increasingly aware of the great need for therapy services in ours and surrounding communities. We have worked directly with kids with disabilities and have always had a desire to meet their needs on a more personal level. In response to this need, we are going to launch an outpatient pediatric therapy clinic in Campbellsville, The Kid Spot Center.  To open this clinic we are attempting to secure grant funding.

  • In a recent phone conversation with one of our pastors, he noted that at morning Mass that day the church had been full, including the whole student body present. When he looked around, it struck him that he was the oldest person there.

    If one lives long enough, this type of thing can be a frequent experience occurring in many settings. It is a bit breathtaking at times.     

  • We are the 12 children of Allen and Louise Cooper – seven boys and five girls.

    Our grandfather, Herbert Brown served this country in the U.S. Army during World War I. Our father was in the army, serving in the European theater during World War II.

    Of the seven Cooper sons, five served this country in some branch of military service.

    I wish to speak to this council about our brother Spec. 4th Class Carl Dalton Cooper.

  • I want to thank Coach Derek Bell for his extraordinary dedication with our youth soccer players and association.

    We are truly fortunate that you are willing to share your time and knowledge with our children. You are such an inspirational mentor to all.

    And for those who ask, who is Coach Bell?

    He is a British soccer enthusiast with a great love and knowledge of soccer.

    He is a devoted coach that gives all of himself from the kindness of his heart to all who will listen.

  • A dear friend recently lost his father and another friend commented that the “father thing” is huge, no matter the relationship.

    Those with good fathers mourn the goodness of the relationship and the sweet memories of good days gone by.

    Those with fathers who caused pain and turmoil in the family by their presence (or by their absence or indifference) mourn the relationship that neveIr was but might have been.

    The father thing, indeed, is huge.

  • A couple of weeks ago, a pair of Canadian geese took up residence in a pond in the field behind our house.

    They appeared to be happy, squawking and swimming and trying to avoid the four longhorns who were there first.

    The longhorns do not like company – save for a few birds and my husband Bud when he feeds them. We once had a problem with stray dogs and coyotes prowling the field. Those cows – with their frightfully long horns and attitude to match – have taken care of the situation.

  • Thank you to the 29 individuals who donated blood June 8 at the Hodgenville Woman’s Club. A double thanks to Pam Baker, Jr. Puyear, Donnie Propes, Nick Boone and Blake Bault for donating using the double red procedure.

    We collected 34 units of blood.

    Many thanks to the volunteers who worked – Cecil Druen and Rob Brown.

    The community blood drive will return Aug. 10.

    Faye Puyear

    Volunteer coordinator

  • Dr. Richard Gilbert of Hodgenville was recently found guilty of tax evasion in a Louisville court. I can’t think of a family more moral and upstanding than the Gilberts. They’re the modern equivalent of The Waltons meets Little House On The Prairie. How could someone so moral and honest to a fault be convicted of tax evasion? His fault and folly was standing on principle and speaking truth to power. The questions he asked the IRS and later posed in court can be distilled to form one simple question. Could you please show me the law that requires me to pay these taxes?