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Opinion

  • Being a wife of a public figure in the agriculture community, I have had the privilege of getting to know many great people along the way. One of those folks is Becky Loyall. Becky and her husband Randall, are 26-year residents of LaRue County and have served in so many community programs, there’s no way to name them all.

    Becky has retired from serving as the local State Farm agent of which she served for over 29 years, but that hasn’t stopped her from being involved.

  • As I began my time in LaRue County, I was first introduced to Jeff Hughes.

    Jeff is president of the Lincoln Days Celebration that begins Saturday, Oct. 2. Jeff has served on the Lincoln Days committee for four years and has worked very hard this year getting the event sponsors and supporters all going in the same direction.

    Born and raised in Hodgenville, Hughes left small town life to go to the “Big Cities,” believing he would never return. But after working some 30 years, Hughes found his way back home to Hodgenville.

  • Preaching politics from the pulpit is being done more and more by religious preachers. True Christianity is inspired by the apostles’ doctrine. Jesus instructed them to preach what they had heard him say. We, by secondary means, are to preach the inspired word from the New Testament. The Holy Spirit inspired men worked hard to make sure it was preserved for all generations.

  • If you haven’t already, I would encourage everyone to take notice of our new “Welcome to Hodgenville” signs, they are just so classy and beautiful.

    Thanks to Mayor Terry Cruse and the City of Hodgenville for the signs, new banners on the square, lights at Creekfront Park, and the free movies with refreshments.

    It is easy to be critical of our leadership, but it should be easier to say thanks.

    Thanks, Mayor and the City of Hodgenville, for your time and effort put into making our great city even greater.

    Pat Davis

    Hodgenville

  • On Labor Day, my husband Bud and I drove to Munfordville and Cave City. We didn’t have a particular reason – just gauming around, as my dad used to say. (Gaum is a southern term used for “having no particular destination.” It may be used also to say “what an awful mess.” Some people spell it “gom.” Chances are, your dad said it too.)

    Anyway, while driving through Munfordville, we noticed a small sign that said “Kentucky Stonehenge.” Having no particular reason not to, we decided to follow the arrow.

  • I write today in support of Mike Hornback for LaRue County Schools Board of Education.

    He has consistently put his support of the LaRue County Schools into action.  That’s the type of school board member LaRue Countians should support. It is easy for people to say that they care about education and our students. There really isn’t anyone who would openly say he or she didn’t support our public education system. However, saying and doing are entirely different things.  That’s what sets Mike Hornback apart from the average citizen.

  • On my way home Tuesday evening, I drove upon an accident on KY 210 in Hodgenville. I suspect the accident had just occurred or had just been discovered because emergency service personnel had not arrived yet. 

  • My husband and I have recently taken a leap of faith; we bought our first home.

    Along with the struggles of moving, we also are making repairs, going to college, working and parenting a 3-year-old. In all of this mess, it is often times easy to forget how blessed we are.

  • Very recently I spent some 650 miles worth of time on road travel to a jubilee celebration for some of our Sisters of Mercy in northern Ohio. The celebration was truly beautiful, such a cause for reflection on and great appreciation of God’s providence.

    We travelers were pretty good about car-pooling – the car passenger list grew to two in Louisville and to four Sisters in Cincinnati. It was great company besides.

  • Coming up in next week’s issue, you will see my weekly column of  “Getting to know you ... better”

    Being the new person in town, I wanted a unique way to get to know the people of LaRue County. I do have several acquaintances here in the county and I look forward to getting to know those folks even “better.”

    So be watching for who I run across during my journeys in and around LaRue County. Some folks you might already know, and others you might meet for the first time.

  • I couldn’t find the pigs at the state fair Sunday. I saw cows, chickens, rabbits, goats, pigeons, doves and geese, but no pigs. The baby pigs were always one of my favorite animals to see at the state fair, though I don’t know why since I always feel bad that they eventually could end up in my belly.

  • After reading Ron Benningfield’s Aug. 23 article “Golfers eye regional championship, Coach Rip Collins pleased by turnout," I was reminded when I graduated LCHS in 1970, golf was not offered to girls. Forty years later, Benningfield reports four girls joined the 2010 golf team.

    Concurrently, about 30 boys join the LCHS boys' golf team and the coach is pleased.

  • During the course of its investigation into the current Gulf of Mexico oil spill, The Associated Press was given information from the then-office of Mineral Management Services that was not making a lot of sense.

  • After a long year of renovations, the Memorial Building at Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park is again welcoming visitors.

    Officials made the decision to close the building to repair the skylight and correct mold problems – a process that was expected to take several months. The century-old building held enough structural surprises to delay the completion.

  • The LaRue County Chamber of Commerce thanks everyone who contributed to our booth at the Kentucky State Fair “Pride of the Counties.” Volunteers donated many hours to tell about LaRue County and our many amenities.

    Others are placing photos on the Chambers Facebook of children with his or her cabin constructed of Lincoln Logs. The Lincoln Logs were a great success and even adults enjoyed the activity.

    We thank Iris LaRue and The Lincoln Museum for lending special items for our display case.

  • One of the hardest things a mother will have to do is let her child go. I had to do that last weekend. After 12 years of school and ballgames in every sport. I had to pack his clothes, TV, and his beloved PlayStation in my truck and drive him to a new beginning – College.

    What ever will I do now? I don’t remember ever being without him. I’ve always done for him or with him. I need to find Carrie Ann again ... and put Mom on the back burner.

  • Has anyone else noticed that there is a new movie out now with “Schmuck” in its title?

  • Rust-Wright Funeral Home was accidentally left out of the list of senior citizens donations at the fair. We apologize for this mistake.

    Charles and Viola Riggs

  • According to Forest Gump, Christians are like a box of chocolates.

    You can’t always tell which ones are nuts.

    Also, when you bite into a bad one, it ruins your taste for the rest of the box.

    That’s what I used as my opening Sunday as the invited guest speaker at the local Unitarian-Universalist fellowship.

  • It has been a long time since I went to the Lincoln Jamboree.

    My family and I went Saturday night and it was great. Rick Whitlock and Blake Whitlock were wonderful (a few Johnny Cash songs). Joel Ray needed a haircut but that didn’t stop his jokes. And the price was just $8. Movies are $8 and you only get half the fun.

    At intermission, there was soft ice cream and the singers sold tapes and gave interviews.

    Thank you, Joel Ray, for the memories. I wish you would bring the raffle back at intermission.