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Opinion

  • Each October, the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities and its member and affiliate institutions mark Christian Higher Education Month.

    House Resolution 300 in June 2003 declared the special month, which celebrates the role of Christ-centered colleges in America’s history and in students’ lives.

    Campbellsville University, located in south central Kentucky, is one of those colleges.

  • Looking for token clues

    A friend was searching through his pocket change for a soda and noticed a token from H.M. Bloyds Café, Hodgenville, in the mix. Him, knowing I am a life long resident of Hodgenville, gave it to me. I asked my mother, who will celebrate her 87th birthday this year, about it and she didn't have any recollection of the business.

  •      Main Street’s Annual Festival of Trees will take entries for a few more days.

         This is a fun way for an organization, a business, a church or individual to make money for a non-profit cause. We’ll take trees of almost any size including table trees, plus wreaths, centerpieces, banners and more.     

         We don’t guarantee results, but last year every single item was sold in the silent auction.

  • In July, Russell Perkins and his nephew, Larry Skaggs, toured the northwest on motorcycles. The Hodgenville men spent about three weeks riding through Wyoming, Montana, Washington and Oregon to the Redwood forests in California.

    They rode more than 4,300 miles and ended the tour at the Sturgis, S.D. motorcycle rally.

    During a stop at the Little Big Horn Battlefield, they searched for and found the gravesite of a young man who died on the battlefield – also known as Custer’s Last Stand - in 1876.

  • There’s a difference between the public’s right to know and what the public “ought to know.”

    It’s a discussion my husband Bud and I have had several times.

    Kentucky’s open meetings and open records laws are near the top of the heap in comparison to other states. The Attorney General’s office sides with the taxpayer nearly every time when a question arises about access to records.

    But there are a few loopholes that could be filled.

  • Terry Cruse is the current mayor of Hodgenville and is running for another term. He has tried to be responsible, as mayor, for seeing to many changes within the city – changes for the better and beautification.

    Of course, there are always some people who criticize everything, when things don’t go exactly like they want. There are people who are never satisfied with anything and always complain about something or someone.

  • The annual “Hours of Prayer,” a worldwide program, will be 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23.

    Please join in one hour of prayer for the nursing homes, various types of care centers and their residents around the world. This is the hour we can all come together as a like-minded body of Christian believers. Even though we may be far apart in location, we can become united in spirit.

    Other locals around the country and the world will be praying.

  • I don’t know how our current cycle of national elections will turn out. I do know I feel jerked around by a lot of what I have heard and read. So many statements of disconnected, incomplete and sometimes incorrect information ….

    Among these:

  • A debt collector yelled at me this morning. I tried to yell back – but I think she hung up the phone before I got to that point.

    And I think it was a debt collector. She had all the required traits – attitude, persistence, hide like a water buffalo.

    The funny thing is … it wasn’t my debt.

    It was my morning snooze, however. I worked 16 hours Monday and another eight Tuesday – on top of the 60-or-so from the previous week – so I believed a few extra zzzzs were owed me.

  • I recently overheard someone say that this time of year is “homecoming time” again.

    There are indeed several special opportunities and calls to look to “going home” and devoting time with loved ones: Thanksgiving and Christmas/New Year’s Day as well as infrequent events: weddings, funerals, special-count birthdays, reunions of various types.

  • Although the Nov. 2 election is still several days away, many voters across Kentucky have already cast their ballots. State law provides opportunities for voters to cast absentee ballots through Nov. 1.

    In LaRue County, the process is simple: Go to County Clerk Linda Carter’s office and tell the worker you would like to cast an absentee ballot. They’ll ask a few questions and assist you with paperwork. You sit at a table, mark the ballot and feed it into a voting machine to be scanned.

    That’s it.

  • In December 2010, I will conclude 16 years of service on the LaRue County Board of Education. I wish to offer my sincere thanks to the voters in my district who have allowed me such an opportunity to serve. During my tenure on the Board, I have had the good fortune to work with three fine superintendents and several equally fine board members.

  • Parents of graduating seniors are at work on funding Project Graduation for the 2011 graduating class. This annual event is an opportunity for students to celebrate this milestone in a fun and safe environment.

    This year we started our fundraising drive by hosting a booth at Lincoln Days. We want to thank all parents that donated items to sale and those who worked.

  • Another Lincoln Days has come and gone. We clearly have a lot to be thankful for. The small rain on Saturday evening interrupted a couple of the artists and dampened the crowd, but it was badly needed. 

  • Last week, Lindsey Burgess came in our office looking for an article about her dad, Bobby Rogers, that was published on April 24, 1996. Bobby passed away Sept. 24.

    It brought back some good memories – about Bobby and my dad, Donald Gene Powell, who died in 2003. I thought I’d run it again just for the hay of it.

    He has a habit of looking at his feet when he talks. But when he finishes a sentence, he looks up quickly – looks you straight in the eye – and smiles.

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    Lexington entrepreneur Paul Spicer faced a big decision 24 years ago.

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    As I was on my knees one Saturday afternoon, I had an epiphany.

  • For women who have lost a baby to miscarriage, stillbirth, or abortion the grief can seem endless. But now there’s an opportunity for closure, a chance to honor an unborn child.

    The Kentucky Memorial for the Unborn, planned for a bluff in Frankfort Cemetery overlooking the river, will be a place of reflection, healing and hope.

  • In today’s society families are made up of a variety of mixes. There are single moms, grandparents acting as guardians, whole families and several other variances.

    One variance not often mentioned is the role of a father. Several active fathers live in our communities. Why are they left out of the picture so often?

  • Being a wife of a public figure in the agriculture community, I have had the privilege of getting to know many great people along the way. One of those folks is Becky Loyall. Becky and her husband Randall, are 26-year residents of LaRue County and have served in so many community programs, there’s no way to name them all.

    Becky has retired from serving as the local State Farm agent of which she served for over 29 years, but that hasn’t stopped her from being involved.