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Opinion

  • THE KENTUCKY STANDARD EDITORIAL BOARD

    Senate Bill 41, sponsored by Sen. Jimmy Higdon, R-Lebanon, has passed the Senate and has been sent to the House for approval.

    If passed the bill would allow those registered as Independent to vote in party primaries traditionally held in May.

  • For the very first time ever, LaRue County Middle School has formed a Community Problem Solving Team. Community Problem Solving provides one of the most significant learning experiences available to students confronting real-life problems. It’s also about students generating and developing a sense of environmental and community awareness.  

  • Last week was a small victory for the public's right to know thanks to The Courier Journal, which played the important role of watchdog.

    All of it started when the CJ asked the state's court system why 3,600 cases had been sealed from public view during the last decade. Sadly when asked, the court system officials admitted they knew little about the cases - including why they were closed, if they were closed properly and if they should remain closed at this time.

  • As of Monday, we have 11 full sized trees, eight table-top trees and a couple of tiny ones, seven wreaths and various other decorative items for Festival of Trees. Main Street volunteers worked long, hard and creatively to put together the trees that are being auctioned for Main Street. Come to see them this Saturday or Thursday through Saturday of next week.

  • Hodgenville Woman’s Club wants to thank everyone for the contributions to our raffle baskets. We thank all the members who donated items and the following:  The Lincoln Museum, Lincoln Days, Sweet Shop, James Ard, Hardin Memorial Hospital Gift Shop, B.J. Clark, The LaRue County Herald News, Garrett’s Furniture, Nancy’s Gift Shop, LaHa’s Red Castle and Lee’s Garden Center. 

    Winner of the Basket of LaRue was Kathy Barnhill.

    Opal Dail

    Hodgenville Woman’s Club

  • Thank you to the 29 individuals who volunteered to donate blood Tuesday at Hodgenville Woman’s Club. A double thanks to those who donated using the “double red” procedure. We received 24 good units of blood.

    Thanks to Becky Loyall and Rob Brown for working at the drive.

    The community blood drive will return Dec. 14.

    Faye Puyear

    Volunteer coordinator

     

  • Each October, the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities and its member and affiliate institutions mark Christian Higher Education Month.

    House Resolution 300 in June 2003 declared the special month, which celebrates the role of Christ-centered colleges in America’s history and in students’ lives.

    Campbellsville University, located in south central Kentucky, is one of those colleges.

  • Looking for token clues

    A friend was searching through his pocket change for a soda and noticed a token from H.M. Bloyds Café, Hodgenville, in the mix. Him, knowing I am a life long resident of Hodgenville, gave it to me. I asked my mother, who will celebrate her 87th birthday this year, about it and she didn't have any recollection of the business.

  •      Main Street’s Annual Festival of Trees will take entries for a few more days.

         This is a fun way for an organization, a business, a church or individual to make money for a non-profit cause. We’ll take trees of almost any size including table trees, plus wreaths, centerpieces, banners and more.     

         We don’t guarantee results, but last year every single item was sold in the silent auction.

  • In July, Russell Perkins and his nephew, Larry Skaggs, toured the northwest on motorcycles. The Hodgenville men spent about three weeks riding through Wyoming, Montana, Washington and Oregon to the Redwood forests in California.

    They rode more than 4,300 miles and ended the tour at the Sturgis, S.D. motorcycle rally.

    During a stop at the Little Big Horn Battlefield, they searched for and found the gravesite of a young man who died on the battlefield – also known as Custer’s Last Stand - in 1876.

  • There’s a difference between the public’s right to know and what the public “ought to know.”

    It’s a discussion my husband Bud and I have had several times.

    Kentucky’s open meetings and open records laws are near the top of the heap in comparison to other states. The Attorney General’s office sides with the taxpayer nearly every time when a question arises about access to records.

    But there are a few loopholes that could be filled.

  • Terry Cruse is the current mayor of Hodgenville and is running for another term. He has tried to be responsible, as mayor, for seeing to many changes within the city – changes for the better and beautification.

    Of course, there are always some people who criticize everything, when things don’t go exactly like they want. There are people who are never satisfied with anything and always complain about something or someone.

  • The annual “Hours of Prayer,” a worldwide program, will be 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23.

    Please join in one hour of prayer for the nursing homes, various types of care centers and their residents around the world. This is the hour we can all come together as a like-minded body of Christian believers. Even though we may be far apart in location, we can become united in spirit.

    Other locals around the country and the world will be praying.

  • I don’t know how our current cycle of national elections will turn out. I do know I feel jerked around by a lot of what I have heard and read. So many statements of disconnected, incomplete and sometimes incorrect information ….

    Among these:

  • A debt collector yelled at me this morning. I tried to yell back – but I think she hung up the phone before I got to that point.

    And I think it was a debt collector. She had all the required traits – attitude, persistence, hide like a water buffalo.

    The funny thing is … it wasn’t my debt.

    It was my morning snooze, however. I worked 16 hours Monday and another eight Tuesday – on top of the 60-or-so from the previous week – so I believed a few extra zzzzs were owed me.

  • I recently overheard someone say that this time of year is “homecoming time” again.

    There are indeed several special opportunities and calls to look to “going home” and devoting time with loved ones: Thanksgiving and Christmas/New Year’s Day as well as infrequent events: weddings, funerals, special-count birthdays, reunions of various types.

  • Although the Nov. 2 election is still several days away, many voters across Kentucky have already cast their ballots. State law provides opportunities for voters to cast absentee ballots through Nov. 1.

    In LaRue County, the process is simple: Go to County Clerk Linda Carter’s office and tell the worker you would like to cast an absentee ballot. They’ll ask a few questions and assist you with paperwork. You sit at a table, mark the ballot and feed it into a voting machine to be scanned.

    That’s it.

  • In December 2010, I will conclude 16 years of service on the LaRue County Board of Education. I wish to offer my sincere thanks to the voters in my district who have allowed me such an opportunity to serve. During my tenure on the Board, I have had the good fortune to work with three fine superintendents and several equally fine board members.

  • Parents of graduating seniors are at work on funding Project Graduation for the 2011 graduating class. This annual event is an opportunity for students to celebrate this milestone in a fun and safe environment.

    This year we started our fundraising drive by hosting a booth at Lincoln Days. We want to thank all parents that donated items to sale and those who worked.

  • Another Lincoln Days has come and gone. We clearly have a lot to be thankful for. The small rain on Saturday evening interrupted a couple of the artists and dampened the crowd, but it was badly needed.