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Opinion

  • When I was a little girl, I attended Pleasant Grove Baptist Church with my mom and brother.

    One year, an ice storm damaged some branches on the two big sycamore trees at the edge of the cemetery. I recall some discussion among the church members whether to cut the trees down – as they were advised by an expert – or to trim the damaged branches and give the trees a second chance.

    Being a bit of a tree-hugger back then, I was glad when the adults decided to do the only wise thing by giving the trees a chance to recover.

  • U.S. Congress

    Sen. Jim Bunning – (202) 224-4343

    Sen. Mitch McConnell – (202) 224-2541

    Rep. Brett Guthrie – (270) 842-9896, fax 202-226-2019, http://guthrie.house.gov

    General Assembly

    Sen. Carroll Gibson, 5th district – (270) 259-6289; carroll.gibson@lrc.ky.gov

    Rep. Dottie Sims, 19th district  – (270) 786-3948; 502-564-8100, ext. 719; dottiesims@lrc.ky.gov

    LaRue Fiscal Court

    Judge/Executive Tommy Turner – 358-4400

    Magistrates:

  • For 10 years I worked with Daphne Loyall at Sunrise Manor Nursing Home.

    Daphne, as administrator, deals with patient care, personnel issues, auditors and government regulations. Just try to read through the latest Medicare requirements and you’ll find plenty of reasons to pull out your hair.

    Daphne had an expression she used when she was having one of “those days,” when no big thing was going wrong but the little things weren’t going right and she felt she would drown in them.

  • My friend Carolyn Martinette was diagnosed with cancer a few months ago. Her initial diagnosis was gloomy, but she went about her life with more optimism than most healthy people muster on their best days. It’s a shame they can’t bottle that kind of courage.

    Besides being deputy circuit court clerk, she was a board member for Main Street and the founder of a unique business – Lincolnlicense.com. She produced souvenir driver’s licenses with Abraham Lincoln’s image.

  • A couple of months ago, someone asked me why I don’t write about my children as often as I used to. When they were younger, they made frequent appearances in my columns – but always with their permission.

    As they became adults, I tried to respect their right to privacy. Amanda, always a whirlwind of sociability, probably wouldn’t mind if I wrote about her life; but Daniel was more introverted. He didn’t care to draw a lot of attention to himself.

    But he managed to do exactly that on Nov. 2.

    That was the day everything changed.

  • That old saying that opposites attract must really be true.

    Through this storm, I kept saying to Dennis, “Isn’t this just beautiful?”

    We live in the woods and though it’s dangerous, the ice looks beautiful glistening in the sunlight. He replies with obscenities I can’t repeat in the paper.

  • In less than three weeks, TV as we know it will end – unless Congress grants an extension. Most of us won’t even notice.

    Thanks to a government-mandated flood of public service messages most Americans know that the transition from digital to analog transmission signals for broadcast television stations must be completed by Feb. 17.

    We’ve seen the countdown clocks, watched the commercials and some even have visited the dtv2009.gov Web site for more information.

  • Here I am, mind spinning with much-to-do in my new office full of information, grant applications, events planning and so much more. Then I look up on my office wall and see a huge check, huge any way you look at it: $132,075 (actually twice that much and more because it is matched by those who benefit from the grant for facade improvements). I am struck anew with the importance and challenge of having a good Main Street program in a small town.

  • I saw something downright appalling the other day.

    It was a fat child.

    Before you start penning those letters or firing off e-mails with indignation that I should say such a thing about the poor little fella, let me explain. His weight was the least of his problems.

    My husband Bud and I were in the grocery store and ended up in an aisle behind a woman pushing a shopping cart with her son inside. She was complaining and griping at the boy because he was riding in the cart, that he wouldn’t get out and was eating all the food.

  • I was saddened this week to hear our new president has reversed previous administration policy on a ban that prohibited giving federal funds to international groups that perform abortions and provide information on it.

  • As many of you already know I have resigned my position as Hodgenville Main Street manager effective Jan. 15.

    Although this decision has been difficult for me I am comforted by the friendships I have made and the wonderful work we have accomplished. The Main Street organization has become like a family to me and I will dearly miss each of them.

  • Early 2009 seems especially rich in new beginnings opportunities:

    •A new calendar year

    •A new/renewed set of resolutions to do better about whatever - be kinder, healthier, lighter, wiser.

    •A new U.S. Congress and so a clean legislative slate (though some unpassed items from the 110th Congress will likely be re-titled and resubmitted). Some shift in legislative priorities.

    •A new U.S. representative for the 2nd Congressional District - a new relationship to begin and build.

  • About a month ago, we received a “Just Ask” question by e-mail: “Is it true that (some of the local candidates) broke campaign laws with their signs and newspaper advertisements?”

    The person asking the question did not provide their name or contact number.

    Without more information, we were unable to file a complaint with the Kentucky Registry of Election Finance. The person we spoke to at KREF said the agency takes complaints about campaign violations under KRS 121 very seriously and provided a link to a pair of brochures on their Web site.

  • As we count off the final minutes of 2008, the challenges of the new year can seem quite daunting.

    Ahead are 365 unknowns. After a year of disappearing jobs, seesaw gasoline prices, a long and sometimes divisive presidential campaign, the continuing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and the threat of economic collapse, it may be difficult to warmly embrace Baby New Year.

    For some, the natural response is to ignore the realities and purchase an extra-strength pair of rose-colored glasses. For others, the turmoil calls for extreme caution and hiding inside their personal shell.

  • People come and go in our lives. For better or worse, some paths cross for only a short time. Others seem to intersect frequently despite relocations, job changes, marriages and the passage of time.

    I have known Tammy Nischan since she was a child. She says our wedding was the first she remembers and talks about how romantic she thought it all was. Years later, we attended her December wedding and gushed over the poinsettia decorations. Our oldest daughter was influenced by it and when it came time for her to wed, she set the date in the Christmas season.

  • In the era of instant messaging, e-mail, the World Wide Web and the iPhone, we’ve become a nation connected and intertwined in ways our grandparents never imagined.

    In spite of all this technology, however, it seems that old friends and family slip through the cracks of our busy lives. While we stay involved in personal pursuits, time flies as fast as information on our favorite dot com.

  • The General Assembly convened on Jan. 6 for a 30-day session. Our first week was spent “organizing,” that is, each chamber chose their leadership teams and committee assignments were distributed. I was honored to be reelected majority whip especially since with the changes in the House of Representatives, I am the only voice for western Kentucky in the leadership of either chamber. The majority whip is charged with counting the votes on the bills presented and providing the caucus’s position on key issues to the senate president.

  • Some co-workers and I recently discussed which generation we fall into —baby boomers, Generation X, Generation Y and so on. At age 33, I am right in the middle of Generation X, which includes those born from 1965-1980.

    We did some unscientific research — also known as Googling — to see which characteristics define our generation. Although it is impossible to make millions of people fit one mold, it was interesting to consider whether the characteristics listed were applicable to our personalities.

  • Some co-workers and I recently discussed which generation we fall into —baby boomers, Generation X, Generation Y and so on. At age 33, I am right in the middle of Generation X, which includes those born from 1965-1980.

    We did some unscientific research — also known as Googling — to see which characteristics define our generation. Although it is impossible to make millions of people fit one mold, it was interesting to consider whether the characteristics listed were applicable to our personalities.

  • Some co-workers and I recently discussed which generation we fall into —baby boomers, Generation X, Generation Y and so on. At age 33, I am right in the middle of Generation X, which includes those born from 1965-1980.

    We did some unscientific research — also known as Googling — to see which characteristics define our generation. Although it is impossible to make millions of people fit one mold, it was interesting to consider whether the characteristics listed were applicable to our personalities.