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Opinion

  • There is no substitute for human blood. The need for blood is constant and the gratification of donating is instant. That is why the American Red Cross will proudly join in the fifth anniversary and worldwide celebration of World Blood Donor Day on June 14. This is the day the world honors blood donors for their priceless contributions to their communities. Blood donors speak a universal language of giving. The very gesture of holding out one’s arm in order to give blood is a strong symbol of solidarity around the world. Our common humanity is expressed in blood donations.

  • Having served as an election commission for several years in another state, I understand the duties of an official and I also understand the passion for the job you are sworn to do and the peer pressure to make bad decisions.

  • On May 17, the city hosted a free concert at the Hodgenville Civic Center for the citizens of Hodgenville and LaRue County.

    In my opinion, the event was a huge success. Few people realize the amount of work that goes into making such an event as this one happen. I would like to take the opportunity to thank everyone involved for their hard work.

  • Just when you think that state government has found some sanity, Gov. Steven Beshear just gave it away. In trying to placate his radical, left-wing voter base, he has decided to continue giving written driving tests in 22 different languages just five days before the State Police were going to English only in a cost-cutting measure to the state and tax payers.

  • It appears to me several people need a Business 101 class. If I were to ask Wal-Mart for a donation to a good charity for $25, they would say yes. If I walked back in and asked for another, they would say no. You see a business cannot afford to give to everybody that asks – they would go broke.

    In the Ronnie’s Custom Cabinets and Furniture By Design misunderstanding, it should be very easy to understand. My father, Ronnie Chelf, could not legally do business with the school system based on him being a board member.

  • Last night I attended my 6-year-old granddaughter’s softball game at the LaRue County Parks and Recreation field. I left wondering: what are LaRue County parents teaching their children?

    Isn’t the reason these games exist is for the kids to have fun?

    The kids in the outfield that couldn’t hear the yelling and screaming probably did have fun. Some of the others – not so much.

  • The Office of Edu­cation Accountability, under the auspices of the commonwealth’s Legislative Research Commission as outlined in Kentucky Revised Statute 7.410, was established to assure efficiency without waste, mismanagement or political influence in our public school systems. Since January of 1991, the OEA has operated a hotline to receive complaints and concerns of potential allegations “that have not been adequately addressed or explained by a local district.”

  • Words take on a life of their own. As someone who spends much of his days dealing with language, it’s interesting and sometimes worrisome to see the changes take shape.

    A recent conversation with my 4-year-old grandson brought one example into focus.

    We were playing a game of some sort and bumped each other. I instinctively said, “Sorry.” I found his reply surprising.

    “Sorry don’t butter the biscuits,” he said.

    Apparently, this is a Southern cliché that he’s learned from his Alabama grandmother.

  • Taekwondo is a great way for kids to exercise, even adults. Kids who are not enrolled in taekwondo have trouble staying fit.

    Sallee’s Family Taekwondo is a wonderful place for kids and adults to make friends, have fun and just be themselves. There are lots of great activities, to keep you in shape, kids and adults will be exercising and having fun at the same time.

  • My husband and I moved here to Hodgenville last October. We have found that we like this little town very much. One of the things we found here is the Senior Citizens Center. It is a very beautiful building, but it takes more than a building to make people feel like they belong.

    This may be the best-kept secret in LaRue County but I want to tell you about it. Monday through Friday, we are served a delicious hot meal at noon just for a donation. We have met some wonderful friends there, people we would not have come to know had it not been for the center.

  • I would like to thank the newspaper for showing my story. I would also like to thank all the businesses that let me place my fliers. Finally, I would like to thank all the people who donated devices. We had a great turnout. Thanks to you, many pounds of harmful chemicals will be kept out of landfills.

    Stephen McKellep

     

  • It appears like every few weeks or so, we are reading in the Herald how our school superintendent is being scrutinized by one of his board members. It seems to me that Norbert Skees is the only one that asks questions at meetings, or at least he’s the only one reported on in the paper. I, for one, want to thank him. This is why I and many others voted for him, so that the superintendent would be held accountable on any question that went unanswered, and that questions would not just be “forgotten,” but followed up on until a satisfactory answer is or was obtained.

  • As a part of our community’s preparation for LaRue County’s Relay for Life event on May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary, the local Relay for Life Committee is recognizing individual survivors and their stories. This week, Kathy Ross, nine-year cancer survivor, is featured.

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life Event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the third of eight stories.

    I was diagnosed with stage 3 ovarian cancer at age 39 in April 2005.

  • A couple of weeks ago I had a toothache. It started out as a nag and turned into a relentless pain that extended from my jaw to above my eye.

    One little abscessed tooth turned into three trips to the dentist and a root canal.

    The funny thing about a toothache is – it overpowers anything else you’re feeling. That includes even heartache.

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the fifth of eight stories. Roy Viers is your typical LaRue County farmer in one sense. On the family’s 200 acres off Fork Road, he and his brother Clyde are planning on planting their annual crops of tobacco and corn. They milk about 50 Holstein cows and work from sun up to sun down.  But in another sense, Roy is not your usual farmer.

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the sixth of eight stories.

    Diane Akridge is a breast cancer survivor. Her husband Al is a colon cancer survivor.

    Here are their stories:

    Al: When you are told you have cancer, it comes as a shock, why me?

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the fourth of eight stories.

    When you look at him now standing tall with his ever-present grin, it is hard to believe that 29 year old Clint Williams was once a sick little boy. But it’s been 20 years since Williams was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma as a toe-headed 9-year-old.

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the second of eight stories.

    Whether you know him as the guy who pumps your gas at the local service station or as the man who is quick with a joke or innocent prank, Jimmy Rogers is living proof that we can all fight back when it comes to cancer.

  • A few of his cousins call him as Charles Ray. To his daughters, he is Daddy and to his six grandchildren and great-grandchildren he is Papaw. And almost everyone knows him as “Red” Hazle, but very few know him as a cancer survivor.