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Opinion

  • The Office of Edu­cation Accountability, under the auspices of the commonwealth’s Legislative Research Commission as outlined in Kentucky Revised Statute 7.410, was established to assure efficiency without waste, mismanagement or political influence in our public school systems. Since January of 1991, the OEA has operated a hotline to receive complaints and concerns of potential allegations “that have not been adequately addressed or explained by a local district.”

  • Words take on a life of their own. As someone who spends much of his days dealing with language, it’s interesting and sometimes worrisome to see the changes take shape.

    A recent conversation with my 4-year-old grandson brought one example into focus.

    We were playing a game of some sort and bumped each other. I instinctively said, “Sorry.” I found his reply surprising.

    “Sorry don’t butter the biscuits,” he said.

    Apparently, this is a Southern cliché that he’s learned from his Alabama grandmother.

  • Taekwondo is a great way for kids to exercise, even adults. Kids who are not enrolled in taekwondo have trouble staying fit.

    Sallee’s Family Taekwondo is a wonderful place for kids and adults to make friends, have fun and just be themselves. There are lots of great activities, to keep you in shape, kids and adults will be exercising and having fun at the same time.

  • My husband and I moved here to Hodgenville last October. We have found that we like this little town very much. One of the things we found here is the Senior Citizens Center. It is a very beautiful building, but it takes more than a building to make people feel like they belong.

    This may be the best-kept secret in LaRue County but I want to tell you about it. Monday through Friday, we are served a delicious hot meal at noon just for a donation. We have met some wonderful friends there, people we would not have come to know had it not been for the center.

  • I would like to thank the newspaper for showing my story. I would also like to thank all the businesses that let me place my fliers. Finally, I would like to thank all the people who donated devices. We had a great turnout. Thanks to you, many pounds of harmful chemicals will be kept out of landfills.

    Stephen McKellep

     

  • It appears like every few weeks or so, we are reading in the Herald how our school superintendent is being scrutinized by one of his board members. It seems to me that Norbert Skees is the only one that asks questions at meetings, or at least he’s the only one reported on in the paper. I, for one, want to thank him. This is why I and many others voted for him, so that the superintendent would be held accountable on any question that went unanswered, and that questions would not just be “forgotten,” but followed up on until a satisfactory answer is or was obtained.

  • As a part of our community’s preparation for LaRue County’s Relay for Life event on May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary, the local Relay for Life Committee is recognizing individual survivors and their stories. This week, Kathy Ross, nine-year cancer survivor, is featured.

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life Event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the third of eight stories.

    I was diagnosed with stage 3 ovarian cancer at age 39 in April 2005.

  • A couple of weeks ago I had a toothache. It started out as a nag and turned into a relentless pain that extended from my jaw to above my eye.

    One little abscessed tooth turned into three trips to the dentist and a root canal.

    The funny thing about a toothache is – it overpowers anything else you’re feeling. That includes even heartache.

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the fifth of eight stories. Roy Viers is your typical LaRue County farmer in one sense. On the family’s 200 acres off Fork Road, he and his brother Clyde are planning on planting their annual crops of tobacco and corn. They milk about 50 Holstein cows and work from sun up to sun down.  But in another sense, Roy is not your usual farmer.

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the sixth of eight stories.

    Diane Akridge is a breast cancer survivor. Her husband Al is a colon cancer survivor.

    Here are their stories:

    Al: When you are told you have cancer, it comes as a shock, why me?

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the fourth of eight stories.

    When you look at him now standing tall with his ever-present grin, it is hard to believe that 29 year old Clint Williams was once a sick little boy. But it’s been 20 years since Williams was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma as a toe-headed 9-year-old.

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the second of eight stories.

    Whether you know him as the guy who pumps your gas at the local service station or as the man who is quick with a joke or innocent prank, Jimmy Rogers is living proof that we can all fight back when it comes to cancer.

  • A few of his cousins call him as Charles Ray. To his daughters, he is Daddy and to his six grandchildren and great-grandchildren he is Papaw. And almost everyone knows him as “Red” Hazle, but very few know him as a cancer survivor.

  • As LaRue Countians prepare for the annual Relay for Life Event scheduled for May 15 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life County Committee is focusing on local survivor stories. This is the seventh of eight stories.

    Cancer knows no age. Just ask fourth-grader Misty Vittitoe.

  • I’m not a person that is interested in politics so I usually don’t know much about what’s going on until Dennis informs me. Most of the time I pretend to listen and shake my head at appropriate times and pray he’s almost done. But once in a while he tells me something that sends me into a tizzy.

  • Study validates importance of Main Street to small communities

    Small communities benefit most from being part of the national Main Street organization, according to a study by the Journal of the American Planning Association. The study also cites the value of volunteers, investing in the community that is “serious work that is seriously fun.” This study illustrates with great factual basis a lot of things which people working for and as part of Main Street have long believed to be true.

    The following material is quoted from a press release in entirety.

  • A lady called our office last week hoping to persuade one of us to “share” one of the new Lincoln bicentennial pennies with her. While we were sympathetic that she has not been able to find one, we weren’t about to mail one of the keepsakes to a perfect stranger.

    It’s not like the pennies have been showing up in pocket change.

  • When I was a kid, my dad brought in a new pup. It was a Boston terrier – a tiny black and white monstrosity with a mashed face, bugged eyes – one blue and one brown – and bad attitude.

    He named it Samson and he loved it dearly.

    It was supposed to be my dog but Samson and I had a difference of opinion early in the relationship and I never cared much for him after that.

    Samson was the worst dog that could have landed on a small farm. He refused to stay home, wouldn’t listen and tormented the other animals.

  • Remember when it was exciting to get mail with your name on it. As a child, it was like Christmas morning in the mailbox. But the thrill of seeing your name on an envelope loses its excitement with maturity and the arrival of bills.

    In this period of economic hardship, news of corporate restructuring, downsizing and a general woe-is-us attitude, the U.S. Postal Service has lined up behind the banks and carmakers in approaching Congress for support.