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Opinion

  • A schedule for the Kentucky General Assembly’s 2014 session was approved this week by legislative leaders.

    The session is scheduled to convene on Jan. 7 and adjourn April 15. It is expected to last 60 working days – the maximum allowed by the state constitution in even-numbered years.

    Legislators will not meet in session on Jan. 20 in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day or on Feb. 17 in observance of Presidents’ Day.

  • Does downtown Hodgenville still have wi-fi available?
    ~•~
    Yes. Lincoln National Bank has been providing the service for a couple of years. The bank pays for Internet service and maintains the necessary equipment.

  • PIPELINE: Speak up, LaRue County
    I read the results of last week’s LaRue County Herald News’ Internet poll with great interest. It indicated that, of 38 responses, 39 percent were in favor of the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline coming through the county and 61 percent were opposed. I realize that such a small sample does not provide the best statistical analysis of the situation, but it does raise a question or two and presents a challenge to those who stand in opposition to the project.

  • People’s Garden
    Who is responsible for the fenced-in garden area at the picnic area at the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park?
    ~•~

    According to Park Superintendent William Justice, the garden in the picnic area of the park is a “People’s Garden.”

    The project was started by Steve Meredith who is with the Commonwealth of Kentucky. He has been working with the state FFA to maintain the garden.
    Justice offered the following:

  • Land agents for the Williams company have been contacting LaRue County property owners, seeking permission to survey or run a section of the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline across their land.

    Tom FitzGerald, Director, Kentucky Resources Council, Inc., provides the following information:

    The Council recommends that landowners do not sign any document granting permission to survey, or any easement, without first consulting a lawyer.

  • At the end of the school year, Hodgenville Elementary School parents received a paper to vote  whether we wanted to buy our children school supplies or give the teacher $20 per child and have the teacher purchase the supplies. What happened to that idea?

    I received my children’s list in the mail and one of my kids needs 48 pencils. I find it hard to believe that any child can use 48 pencils in a school year. Did the $20 idea get voted down, or was it just not possible?

    ~•~

    HES Principal Sue Osborne responded:

  •  Did you notice the downpour that struck LaRue County just after 4 p.m. Monday?

  • When a refrigerator croaks – when its compressor bleats its last breath – you have no choice.

    You must get another one – pronto – or risk losing all those interesting things you have stored that probably should have been thrown out weeks earlier.

    But that’s beside the point.

  • We received a visit in the office last week from long-time herpetologist Bob Todd.

    Mr. Todd, who lives in Sonora, saw the article about a copperhead in last week’s LaRue County Herald News and wanted to offer his opinion on it.

    Mr. Todd knows snakes. He’s spent a lifetime studying them.

    He thinks the snake pictured was not a venomous copperhead but a harmless Prairie Kingsnake.

    To the unpracticed eye, the snakes closely resemble each other. Their coloration is similar.

  • In a world molded by technological advancements, one that is constantly plugged in, it’s difficult to make room for what some used to call “free time” – time away from work and distractions.
    People are quick to jump in their cars to head home with a cell phone literally attached to their heads. People fail to realize how dangerous staying plugged in while driving can be.

  • Mother Jones, a “fearless” left-wing magazine, last week broke a story about the covert recording of a meeting of U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell’s campaign staff.
    Yawn. What a scoop.
    Was anyone shocked by any part of this story?
    And if you were ... why?
    I wasn’t surprised that someone secretly taped Sen. McConnell’s campaign strategy meeting. I’m surprised it doesn’t happen more often.
    I wasn’t surprised that Sen. McConnell and his staff were heard trash talking on the 12-minute tape.

  •  A recent study published by the Society of Actuaries — the nation's leading group of financial risk analysts, and as non-partisan a group as you will find — revealed that thanks to Obamacare, the costs of medical claims for Kentuckians next year would rise an average of 34 percent. With wages stagnant and gas and tuition prices skyrocketing, these premium increases will be especially devastating for middle-class families.

  •  Just when I think I'm beyond doing something particularly horrendous and downright wrong, I do it.

    I stole a packet of Sweet 'N Low the other day.

    I put it back, because I felt guilty. Actually, I put it back because my daughter caught me, and then I felt guilty. But putting it back doesn't change the fact that I'm a Sweet 'N Low thief.

  •  Are they planning to have “flea market days” at the LaRue County Fairgrounds again this summer?

    ~•~

    Marie Riggs, a recent addition to the LaRue County Fair Board, has taken over this project.

    Riggs said the flea market will be open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays beginning April 13.

    Call her at 325-3041. She will provide information about costs and set-ups. 

  •  Does anyone know what “the chair” represents?

    This wicker chair was tied to a tree behind the LaRue County Courthouse a couple of months ago.

    Two people at the courthouse had different explanations. One said someone from Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church, adjacent to the courthouse, tied the chair to the tree for a church function.

  •  If I had planned to speak for 13 hours when I took the Senate floor, I would’ve worn more comfortable shoes. I started my filibuster with the words, “I rise today to begin to filibuster John Brennan’s nomination for the CIA. I will speak until I can no longer speak” — and I meant it.

  •  The caller on the other end of the phone line was near exacerbation. He had been given the run-around by government officials, the very people he put in office to represent him, and his quest for answers was met time and again with roadblocks.

  •  Every year members of the Kentucky General Assembly descend on Frankfort to carry out the duties that our citizens expect to do. That expectation includes making sure that the legislative process is open and transparent to all Kentuckians.

    But time and time again, and to the frustration of many of us in the Kentucky House of Representatives, the legislative process seems in some cases to be stuck in the back rooms of the Capitol. Never has that been clearer than our efforts to address one of the major issues of the 2013 Session: reforming our public pension system.