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Opinion

  • This week, the FederalCommunicatios Commission is diving into a debate on an issue that could negatively impact the future of the Internet.       

    These meetings about so-called net neutrality regulations are taking place in Washington, D.C., but their ramifications will be felt across the Commonwealth if the FCC is successful in putting onerous new rules on the Internet.

  • While some members of Congress sing the praises of cap-and-trade to combat climate change, I wonder if they have even bothered to look across the Atlantic Ocean to see how the same system has worked in Europe.

    Europe started a cap-and-trade system in the 1990s and studies show it has done next to nothing to stop the emission of greenhouse gasses.

  • Motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults in the U.S. Here in Kentucky, statistics from the Transportation Cabinet show that drivers between the ages of 15 and 20 were involved in more than 26,000 collisions in 2008, resulting in 141 fatalities. Seventy-percent of those killed were teenagers. According to the National Transportation Safety Board, 16-year-old drivers are more than twice as likely to be involved in fatal crashes as older drivers.

  • October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    Breast cancer remains the most common cancer among women in the U.S. according to a new American Cancer Society report, Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2009-2010.

  • I received an e-mail the other day and I wanted to share it with you. I checked out the story to verify it was true before I shared it. I love this lady’s patriotism and spunk.

  • What seems like a very long time ago, I studied Latin–for two years in high school. I also studied German in high school for a year and French for two years in college. I’m no good at any of them.

    Life experiences indicate that such studies were beneficial even though my memory for names is porous indeed. Any knowledge of another language surely puts one’s first language in perspective. Further, English has a lot of roots in Latin and other languages both in its general structure and numerous words.

  • In the relentless campaign to bring the most predatory form of gambling to the Commonwealth, it appears the gambling lobby has traded horse racing for the more brutal sport of kings — bear-baiting.

    The malicious bloodsport, popular in England during the reign of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, pitted well-trained hunting dogs against a bear chained to a post, often with his teeth and claws removed. The nobility cheered on the dogs and jeered at the “vicious” bear trying to defend himself.

  • I want to say thank you to the 32 individuals who volunteered to donate blood at the Hodgenville Woman’s Club this past week. Many thanks to the volunteers who worked: Cecil Druen, Lois Whelen and Rob Brown. Also, thanks to Lawson’s Florist for the support of the blood drive. The Community Blood Drive will return Dec. 8.

    Faye Puyear

     

  • Fellow Christians: Please join us in one hour of prayer, Oct. 24, for nursing homes, various types of care centers and their residents around the world. This is the hour we can all come together as a like-minded body of believers. Though we are far apart in location, we can become united in spirit.

    The time for this prayer will be at 7 p.m. Other locales around the country and world will be different in time, but will coincide with our time.

    Pray, also, for people to feel the desire to volunteer services.

  • Chances are each of us reading this article grew up with some interaction with a grandparent. The grandparents from our childhoods or memories probably are similar; we tend to know them as older or elderly, gentle but hard working, perhaps not in good health, maybe retired with leisure time, probably “spoilers,” people you visited after church on Sunday or on special days.

  • The 2009 Lincoln Days Parade was easily the largest since I have been working on the parade and perhaps the largest in Lincoln Days’ history, with an almost 50 percent increase in participation. With such growth, I was anxious that the volunteers might be overwhelmed. Instead, this parade was the best I have experienced as a worker anywhere.

  • When President Obama recently mentioned that one big insurer controlled 96 percent of the market in just one state, a collective (and very loud) gulp went down the throats of insurance industry executives. You see, this domination of the small group market, where small businesses are forced to buy insurance, drives costs up at an unsustainable rate.

  • The basket committee of the Hodgenville Woman’s Club thank all club members who contributed and worked for the Club’s Lincoln Day project “Basket Full of LaRue County.”

    Thank you to the businesses and individuals listed for the donations to the basket and their continued support of Hodgenville Woman’s Club: Lincoln Days, James Ard, The LaRue County Herald News, Lincoln National Bank, LaRue County Extension Service, Lincoln Loft Books, Bault Oil Company, LaHa’s Red Castle and The Lincoln Museum.

  • The theme of Lincoln Days 2009 was “Lincoln, The Man.” But it may be remembered as “The Year of the Strollers.”

    Wherever you turned, you saw young mothers and fathers or grandparents maneuvering strollers through the crowd.

    Others carried toddlers on their shoulders or held the hands of older children as they lined the street for the parade.

  • When I was a young student I wrote a significant paper that dealt with human response to change. I no longer have the paper on hand, but I remember its bottom line and have tried to heed its wisdom over the decades.

    That bottom line: most people generally resist change (granted that some among us seem to thrive on it).

    Given that many of us like change in moderation as we live through a period of history heavy with changes, stress is evident in many sectors of society.

  • If there are still any BRAC doubters out there, you should have seen the turn out for the Fort Knox Job Information Sessions at the Urban League Economic Empowerment Tour and Career Fair in Louisville earlier this month. We had hundreds of folks show up to learn more about the employment opportunities coming to the installation. Believe me, most were plenty interested in finding out how to qualify and apply for these future positions. 

  • A recent story about Winnie Read and her 45-year service to LaRue County’s 4-H program caught the attention of Anna Mae McCubbin.

    While she has lived 52 years in her Elizabethtown home, Mrs. McCubbin takes The LaRue County Herald News to keep up with events in and around the area where she was raised.

    She asked for a couple extra copies of the Sept. 9 edition to share with far away friends.

  • My daughter Amanda is growing tomatoes in a small backyard in Lexington. She is having some luck – but I told her she needs fertilizer. I promised to bring her a bucket of chicken poop for side dressing the next time we visit.

    I’m not sure how that will go over with the neighbors in her subdivision. On the other hand, what they don’t know won’t hurt them.

    My granddaughter Claire, who is not yet 2, is enthralled with the cherry tomatoes – they are “hers,” she says. She eats them right off the vine.

  • My husband Bud can’t distinguish black from navy.

    Every Sunday morning before church, he asks me whether his suit jacket matches his pants. Since my eyes are nearly as bad as his, I have him take the ensemble to the sun porch where the light is better.

    I’ll spend several minutes trying to figure out whether the navy is actually dark blue or a faded black. And if both the pants and the jacket are navy, are they the same navy?

    Finally, Sunday, I gave up and shared one of my grandmother Vada’s tidbits of wisdom with him.

  • It has been my pleasure to serve as Lincoln Days president for these last two years.

    It is always a big job, but working with a good board makes it fun. The officers are Jeff Hughes, vice president; Rob Barnhill, treasurer; and Carolyn Mather, secretary.  Members at large are Jimmy Curle, Philip Setters and Hollie Sexton.  We are all dedicated to making our festival better each year.