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Opinion

  • As citizens of this great democracy, we have the right to openly express our political viewpoints and to freely share our ideological differences. When we exercise these rights in a thoughtful and respectful manner, we have the potential to foster greater good. Yet when we refuse to listen to opposing perspectives or when we treat each other with blatant disrespect, ill-will and mistrust are often the result.

  • I’ve just returned to work after taking a few weeks vacation. I needed some quiet time as the date Nov. 2 loomed. This was the one-year anniversary of the death of my 22-year-old son and if I could have crawled in a cave somewhere and avoided any pain associated with that date, that would have been fine with me.

    But that isn’t the way it works.

    If you try to hide from it, it waits for a chance to jump out and knock you down when you’re not expecting it.

  • Adoption awareness

    November is Adoption Awareness month. For over 20 years those involved with adoption have set this time aside to only honor those who have opened their hearts and homes to become “Forever Families” and to remind us that there are, at any given day, over a half million children across the United States in foster care and a high number of those children will not be able to return home. When that happens, these children become available for adoption.

  • I may be dating myself in age, but some of the earliest memories I have of Presidents and First Families were the Fords and Carters. It seems of the two, I especially recall President Jimmy Carter, his wife Rosalynn, and daughter Amy. I remember watching them on television, hearing his speeches and watching them as a family. Even back then President Carter and the First Lady seemed very genuine and humble.

  • On behalf of Disabled American Veterans Chapter 003 Elizabethtown, I extend my warmest thanks to the area businesses that allowed us to conduct our annual Forget-Me-Not fundraising drive at their businesses. Without the cooperation of the Elizabethtown and Radcliff Wal-Mart, Dolphin Drive Kroger, and the Ft. Knox Commissary, the DAV would not be able to help our local veterans and their families in their times of need.

  • Sincerity and enthusiasm are an irresistible combination.

    Standing in the entry lobby at the Lincoln Museum on Friday, a series of speakers celebrated the selection one week earlier of U.S. 31E and U.S. 150 from Hodgenville to Danville as a National Scenic Byway.

    The designation reaffirms our local heritage, including the connection to Abraham Lincoln. In fact, the selected section of roadway will be known as the Lincoln Heritage Highway.

  • I called the health department to get swine flu shots for me and my husband. I am 68 and have COPD, asthma and diabetes. My husband is 78 and has COPD, a leaky heart valve and is on oxygen.

    They informed me we could not have a shot if we are over 65, even though I explained we are high risk.

    If you are an illegal alien, you can have the swine flu shots. I do believe my tax dollars are paying for these shots. I guess our government is hoping to get rid of all the older people in this country and take care of all of the people from other countries whether illegal or not.

  • Veterans Day was originally called Armistice Day and was originally set as a U.S. legal holiday to honor the end of World War I. In 1954, the name Armistice was replaced with the word Veterans. Over the years politicians argued as to when it should be held until finally in 1968, President Gerald R. Ford singed a law to return the annual observance of Veterans Day to the original date of Nov. 11 beginning in 1978.

    If you have never had any military ties, it’s probably hard for you to understand the importance of honoring these men and women.

  • Veterans Day was originally called Armistice Day and was originally set as a U.S. legal holiday to honor the end of World War I. In 1954, the name Armistice was replaced with the word Veterans. Over the years politicians argued as to when it should be held until finally in 1968, President Gerald R. Ford singed a law to return the annual observance of Veterans Day to the original date of Nov. 11 beginning in 1978.

    If you have never had any military ties, it’s probably hard for you to understand the importance of honoring these men and women.

  • It’s that time of year again when we are given the wonderful opportunity to provide Christmas for a child who otherwise will receive no gifts — maybe not even know it is Christmas or about Christmas — maybe has never heard of Jesus. The public is invited to pack all of Christmas possible into a shoebox or pack a couple or many; and share our love and the love of Jesus with a child perhaps in North America or in the remotest parts of the earth.

  • This week, the FederalCommunicatios Commission is diving into a debate on an issue that could negatively impact the future of the Internet.       

    These meetings about so-called net neutrality regulations are taking place in Washington, D.C., but their ramifications will be felt across the Commonwealth if the FCC is successful in putting onerous new rules on the Internet.

  • While some members of Congress sing the praises of cap-and-trade to combat climate change, I wonder if they have even bothered to look across the Atlantic Ocean to see how the same system has worked in Europe.

    Europe started a cap-and-trade system in the 1990s and studies show it has done next to nothing to stop the emission of greenhouse gasses.

  • Motor vehicle crashes remain the leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults in the U.S. Here in Kentucky, statistics from the Transportation Cabinet show that drivers between the ages of 15 and 20 were involved in more than 26,000 collisions in 2008, resulting in 141 fatalities. Seventy-percent of those killed were teenagers. According to the National Transportation Safety Board, 16-year-old drivers are more than twice as likely to be involved in fatal crashes as older drivers.

  • October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

    Breast cancer remains the most common cancer among women in the U.S. according to a new American Cancer Society report, Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2009-2010.

  • I received an e-mail the other day and I wanted to share it with you. I checked out the story to verify it was true before I shared it. I love this lady’s patriotism and spunk.

  • What seems like a very long time ago, I studied Latin–for two years in high school. I also studied German in high school for a year and French for two years in college. I’m no good at any of them.

    Life experiences indicate that such studies were beneficial even though my memory for names is porous indeed. Any knowledge of another language surely puts one’s first language in perspective. Further, English has a lot of roots in Latin and other languages both in its general structure and numerous words.

  • In the relentless campaign to bring the most predatory form of gambling to the Commonwealth, it appears the gambling lobby has traded horse racing for the more brutal sport of kings — bear-baiting.

    The malicious bloodsport, popular in England during the reign of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, pitted well-trained hunting dogs against a bear chained to a post, often with his teeth and claws removed. The nobility cheered on the dogs and jeered at the “vicious” bear trying to defend himself.

  • I want to say thank you to the 32 individuals who volunteered to donate blood at the Hodgenville Woman’s Club this past week. Many thanks to the volunteers who worked: Cecil Druen, Lois Whelen and Rob Brown. Also, thanks to Lawson’s Florist for the support of the blood drive. The Community Blood Drive will return Dec. 8.

    Faye Puyear

     

  • Fellow Christians: Please join us in one hour of prayer, Oct. 24, for nursing homes, various types of care centers and their residents around the world. This is the hour we can all come together as a like-minded body of believers. Though we are far apart in location, we can become united in spirit.

    The time for this prayer will be at 7 p.m. Other locales around the country and world will be different in time, but will coincide with our time.

    Pray, also, for people to feel the desire to volunteer services.

  • Chances are each of us reading this article grew up with some interaction with a grandparent. The grandparents from our childhoods or memories probably are similar; we tend to know them as older or elderly, gentle but hard working, perhaps not in good health, maybe retired with leisure time, probably “spoilers,” people you visited after church on Sunday or on special days.