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Opinion

  • At this point I have been involved in helping promote active citizenship for 33 years. I place great value on our United States representative democracy and the responsibility of each of us to keep this gift strong.

  • Thank you to the 13 individuals who braved the weather to donate blood Feb. 9 at the Hodgenville Woman’s Club. The snow caused some problems and early closure.

    Many thanks to the volunteers who worked – Cecil Druen, Opal Dail and Diane Rock.

    The community blood drive returns April 13.

    Faye Puyear

    Volunteer Coordinator

  • After receiving dozens of calls and complaints from Kentuckians, Attorney General Jack Conway has asked Topix.com, an interactive message board Web site host, to provide information regarding its policies dealing with abusive posts that violate the Web site’s terms of service. The Office of Consumer Protection has received calls and complaints from concerned citizens who allege that false and defamatory information about children, as well as adults, has been posted on Topix.

  • What type of government do you have in your country? There are so many to choose from. One could have one of two types of monarchies. A person might have a democracy, which is what my country has. Also one can have a dictatorship.

  • Three years ago, we learned that Steven Spielberg planned to make a movie about our Abe Lincoln. The opening was to coincide with the 200th anniversary of the birth of the 16th President.

    If you’re a movie-goer, you may have noticed, ahem, no Lincoln movie.

    We ran a front page story with photos of Liam Neeson and Holly Hunter reading lines in front of a gathering of the Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. (Sally Field has since been cast in the role of Mary Todd.) We reported on Neeson’s fact-finding visit to Hodgenville in preparation of the role.

  • The Migrant Education staff would like to thank all the students from Abraham Lincoln Elementary and Hodgenville Elementary who participated in the Christmas mitten and toboggan collection. Many of the students gave up their classroom Christmas gift exchange and instead brought in mittens, gloves and toboggans for students in need. Many migrant and Spanish speaking adults and children received the gloves and toboggans, which have been a blessing during this cold weather.

    Sarah Hornback, Family Services Director

    Rosa Kelly, Migrant Recruiter

  • Running, hiding, crawling and hunting. These are only a few of the things that Jews had to do while escaping the German Nazis in World War II. They traveled through tunnels to get to forests. They lived inside forests with their family groups. The food they got they stole from nearby people. Jews stayed in these forest family camps for their own survival and to stay safe from the Nazis.

    The underground tunnels allowed the Jews to stay hidden until they found a safe house.

  • Students on the sixth grade Kids.com team at LaRue County Middle School recently created a feature article in their social studies class. Teacher Jim B. Phelps said students were able to choose any topic that they had studied in social studies class up to this point in the year.

  • What’s your government and economy type? Is it communism? Communism has a unique history. For the government they have dictatorship. With communism, people have very little freedom.

    The dictator controls all political freedoms. A dictator is the leader and makes all laws for the people. The ruler usually takes over by force and relies on the police and military to come into and keep power. Some people say that a dictator rules with an “iron grip.” 

    Communism doesn’t end here; it also has a command economy.

  • LaRue County FFA will celebrate National FFA Week through Feb. 27. “Lead Out Loud” is the theme this year as members pledge to show off what makes them premier leaders in their schools and communities.

  • I recently had the privilege of meeting with the leadership of the 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, at their new Fort Knox headquarters. Col. Christopher Toner and his team want to do all they can to help their soldiers and families settle in to our region and we wanted to be sure they knew our region was here to make this job easier. I expressed the great affection our communities have for soldiers and their families and how appreciative we all are for their brave service.

  • I had planned a column about Abraham Lincoln this week because it is nearly his birthday (201 years) and he was born here after all.

    But a monumental event occurred a few days early that overshadowed any thoughts of our 16th President. He’ll have to wait another week.

    Friday, my daughter Amanda gave birth to my second granddaughter after a relatively short labor. At least it was much shorter than Amanda’s labor with her first baby.

    I was exhausted afterwards. Birthing babies is hard work.

  • As you read this, the 2010 General Assembly Session has convened. It will be a 60-day session in which our first priority will be developing a budget under serious financial constraints. We also will be looking at pro-life legislation, legislative retirement reform, government transparency, allowing the people to decide on whether they would like to expand gambling, as well as other issues. It promises to be a busy session.

  • Not untypically, many of us in these United States believe we have the best country there is – that it has both the best political and economic systems. While not exactly utopia or Camelot of King Arthur fame, we believe it is the best humanity has yet devised.

    While I am not a professional historian, I do know that there are many major wonderful (and not so wonderful) world powers that have come and gone over decades, centuries and millennia. One of the tasks in studying history seems to be to get acquainted with these powers and what happened as they evolved.

  • Main Street relies on help from our friends such as the Lincoln Museum, Chamber of Commerce, City of Hodgenville, board members and directors.

    The value of a volunteer group such as the Genealogy Society is easy to show in matching hours contributed toward the Historic District expansion project. The value of volunteers is hard to assess and impossible to overstate. The recent luncheon is a case in point. The Community Room cost ($100) was donated (a frequent happening for us) by the Lincoln Museum. 

  • As a lifelong journalist, I love a good story. Here’s one for you.

    A 16-year-old rides a 100-cc trail bike to a town near his home to apply for his first job. He’s only one semester removed from a high school typing class that may be his only qualification for the position.

    He gets the part-time job, makes the most of it and begins a career. Through a lot of effort and long hours, he comes across opportunities that eventually take him far away from home. But life knocks him around and sends him back.

  • Kentuckians with iPhones will find it easier than ever to remain connected to the Kentucky State Capitol.

    The Legislative Research Commission has unveiled an iPhone-friendly way for people to have ready access to information about lawmakers, legislation moving through the General Assembly and legislative news. With one touch on their home screen, iPhone users can pull up key features of the Kentucky Legislature Home Page that have been formatted specifically for their phones.

  • Every now and then I read something in the newspapers that simply takes my breath away. This time it’s the recent story about the Buffalo School Apartments project.

    I think I got it.

    AU Associates gets the property declared a historic place. This qualifies them to get federal and state money to renovate it. They get $2.8 million. Can I assume that is tax money? I think so, money we paid in state and federal taxes.

    “We’ve really been praying for this for some time,” said (Johan) Graham.

  • Every now and then a government body has the opportunity to truly “fix things.” A second chance to do things right.

  • My first acquaintance with pyramids was in history and geography classes – where I learned that pyramids were monuments to important people in the Middle East who died a very long time ago.

    Then pyramids showed up in math classes.