• For my article this month, I had thought of looking up another intriguing quote about reading or books. And it occurred to me that this can become a dull way to express my own enthusiasm for my job and my library. These are a couple of my own ideas that express some of what reading a book can be like:

    Reading a book is an adventure in traveling to unknown lands, meeting friends, through the pages of a book, that I will never meet face-to-face.

  • Head lice infest 10-12 million people (most commonly children three to twelve years of age) each year in the United States. Head lice are primarily transferred from person to person by direct head-to-head contact or by several people using the same combs, brushes, hats, costumes, head-phones, athletic equipment, towels, or bedding.

  • By State Rep. Terry Mills

    Kentucky received some welcome news last month when a national study found that no state had a smaller gap when comparing the high school graduation rates of students from low- and higher-income families.

    The average gap across the country stands at 15 percent, but it’s just one percent here in the commonwealth.  In fact, our low-income students graduate at a higher rate than the overall national average, something only five other states can say.

  • It’s still a while down the road, but the year 2033 will be a pivotal one for our country, because that’s when U.S. Census Bureau projects there will be more citizens over the age of 65 than under the age of 18.

  • A lot of people have been complaining about the news coverage of both the Republican National Convention and the Democrat National Convention.

    I have heard a lot of Republicans complaining about MSNBC’s coverage of the RNC, stating MSNBC reporters have Democrat biases. On the flip side, I have heard a lot of Democrats complaining about Fox News’ coverage on the DNC, stating Fox News reporters had Republican biases.

  • By State Representative Terry Mills

    Some of Kentucky’s most successful academic programs take place, oddly enough, when the school year is over.

    Several of these got their start in the 1980s, and they have since given thousands of our brightest middle and high school students a chance to come together in a college setting and learn in ways that often extend beyond the traditional classroom.

  • I’m still in shock at the overnight popularity of this new phenomenon called Pokemon Go.

    For those of you who haven’t heard about this popular game yet, Pokemon Go is a mobile phone game that uses GPS and cameras on smartphones to catch these critters called Pokemon, which are these little virtual characters you can’t see with the naked eye. You can only see them if you play the game and have the app installed on your smartphone. Then players can battle each other with their Pokemon, train their Pokemon and so on.

  • I had a great weekend as I attended the Kentucky Southern Gospel Music Singing Convention last Friday and Saturday in Cave City.

    The convention featured around 100 different southern gospel groups from throughout the state and other parts of the country. Each group was able to sing around three songs on stage each night.

  • I love history, in fact my most ideal form of relaxation would be lounging in a chair outside in the shade with a history book; almost any era or subject of history will do.

    When I discovered my son, Eli, had a keen interest in Abraham Lincoln I was thrilled! I jumped on the opportunity to bring the kids with me to Hodgenville when I forgot something at the office Saturday. After we got what I needed we stopped by the Lincoln Museum. While I was busy keeping Sam under control, Isaac and Eli were admiring the scenes from Lincoln’s life.

  • Right now, as I begin writing this, the game is tied. What’s that? You don’t know what game I’m talking about? Oh, well, it’s only the biggest game in the NBA. That’s right, I’m watching the NBA Championship game at the edge of my seat with a sick feeling in my stomach because the Cleveland Cavs are playing and the odds are completely against them.

  • Baby Boomers, Generation X and Millennials. The lack of retirement savings in our country is an epidemic that affects all three generations.

    According to the 2016 Retirement Confidence Survey from the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI), only two-thirds of workers (or their spouses) are currently saving for retirement, with 26 percent reporting they have less than $1,000 saved. It’s time to sweat the small stuff.

  • I’ve been sick, so sick in fact that, finally, after I was lovingly sent home by Allison last Monday and told to go to the doctor and get checked out, I went to the doctor for the second time in less than a week. First time, was bronchitis, I didn’t rest and take care of myself. Long story short: it made me worse, I had mononucleosis and the antibiotics I was on caused me to break out in a rash all over. I was off for all of last week.

  • Site Selection is not a magazine most of us would keep on our coffee table, but for those in government and business who track economic development, this publication is one not to be missed.

    Fortunately, it has had a lot of good things to say about Kentucky in recent years, and over the past two, it has awarded us its annual Governor’s Cup for having more major job announcements than any other state on a per capita basis.

  • The General Assembly may be at its busiest during the first several months of the year, when the House and Senate are focused on passing new laws, but the summer and fall months are important as well to the legislative process.

  • I overheard an adult mom recently commenting to a friend that their college-aged daughter refused to Friend her on Facebook. The other person commented enthusiastically that her daughter had friended her, and she followed her closely! I “almost” did not have the heart to tell them they were both out-of-touch with reality.

  • Worldwide, wheat is the third most-produced grain, trailing only corn (maize) and rice. In the United States, wheat accounts for about two-thirds of all grains consumed. However, much of the wheat we eat is refined (missing its nutritious bran and germ) or enriched (refined grain with just five of the dozens of missing or reduced nutrients added back in).

  • Eli is our second child; to say he’s energetic would be an understatement. He is lightning in a bottle, wrapped in a warm hug and decorated with Optimis Prime and Angry Birds.

    He loves to draw, loves school and he knows no strangers. He friends with everyone. He recently ‘graduated’ from kindergarten. His school had a Kindergarten promotion ceremony where the students got up on stage, received an award for what they do best, then came back up later for their little diplomas. Each child got to dress up as what they wanted to be when they grow up.

  • I have been amazed by a new phase that is taking over the standard yard sales and those are pallet sales.

    I discovered this new phenomenon when visiting family back in my hometown of Brodhead and Rockcastle County. My mom and several people in my family hit them up often and have bought a lot of different stuff from them.

    It’s really sparked my interest and being naturally curious, I have been doing some research on how these pallet sales work.