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Opinion

  • Swimming against a strong current is an apt comparison for the plight of most workers today.

    A recent study by the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy illustrates just how hard it has become not only for the unemployed, but even for those who get up every day and go to work.

    “The State of Working Kentucky 2014” reported that between 2001 and 2013, Kentucky workers’ median wages fell 8 percent after adjusting for inflation.

    And those are the workers who still have jobs.

  • Joel Ray Sprowls is celebrating 60 years of entertaining audiences with his Lincoln Jamboree. Six decades of success in any business is truly something to be proud of, but in entertainment it’s almost unheard of, with rare exceptions like the legendary George Burns, or Bob Hope.

    Joel Ray is LaRue county’s own legendary performer, and Master of Ceremonies.

  • The recent developments world-wide are a reminder why our nation needs a strong national defense. Fort Knox is key to our military’s future. Unfortunately, this Administration has taken actions that reduce our military advantage when we should be doing all that we can to keep our advantage strong.

  •  To help get your children ready for kindergarten, the Governor’s Office of Early Childhood reminds everyone that young children need nutritious food, stimulating toys and lots of hugs and kisses. But beginning at birth, they also need to be talked, sung and read to.

  • I would like to introduce myself to the community. My name is Caitlin Underwood and I have been working part time as a circulation clerk at the LaRue County Public Library since February. I graduated from LaRue County High School in May 2009 and then attended Lindsey Wilson College in Columbia, until I graduated cum laude in December 2013 with a bachelor’s degree in human services and counseling.

  • This last week, I watered the garden (as well as a few hospital stairwells) with a lot of tears as my heart is heavy and filled with emotion.

    My father, the master gardener, has bid his farewell and makes ready to depart this Earth.

    To have lived 95 years is quite an achievement, but to live 95 years happily is an even greater one.

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    Winning Essay by Ronald Dale Mather in the Hodgenville Jaycee Independence Hall Essay Contest

  • I am what most people would call a nerd. I always have been. I can rattle off the names of every major (and most minor) Game of Thrones characters, I love history, I take an odd amount of pride in remembering completely pointless movie trivia (did you know that all of Jeff Bridges’ attire in The Big Lebowski was from his own closet?) and I generally occupy my free time with the nerdiest hobbies around. I bowl, I play video games and I’m all caught up in collecting those Pop! vinyl figures lately.

  • Steve LaRue

    Groundhog Hill

    August, named in honor of the deified Roman Emperor Augustus, is the month of harvest.

    This month at Groundhog Hill, I hope to harvest Peruvian purple corn, late top crop green beans, a few Rutgers and Cherokee purple tomatoes, sunflowers, cantaloupes, radishes, and of course, zinnias.

    So far, the purple corn is taking its own (and hopefully, sweet) time. The other day, I urged the now-gigantic stalks in both English and in Spanish to hurry up and to produce some bloody corn.

  • When I first applied for an internship through the Kentucky Press Association, I was not sure of what all it would entail. Obviously, I assumed that I would be writing, but even though I have been writing all my life and have taken journalism classes, it would’ve been wrong for me to call myself a journalist, because, frankly, I was not.

  • Thank you for the opportunity to share more about our vision of the future of Hardin Memorial Health (HMH). Our current construction of private rooms is only one part of an exciting, comprehensive vision positioning HMH for the future. Three years ago a strategic planning committee, comprised of Board members, physicians, community leaders, and hospital staff began a process that culminated in the development of a long-range strategic plan for HMH, which was unanimously approved by all members of the Board.

  • A few months ago, I was invited to become an at-large board member of the Kentucky Press Association. I’ve learned a lot at the few meetings I’ve attended – which is always a good thing.

    On a couple of occasions, I’ve felt very out of place. There are several representatives from the state’s largest dailies on that board – and their experiences and outlooks are different from mine.

  • We pray for God to bless America, but God has already shed his love, mercy and grace upon our land. It is our turn to bless America.

    But how?

    We can bless America by being good citizens, being patriotic, obeying the laws, paying our taxes and voting. The Apostle Paul many years ago in I Timothy 2:1-6 gave some ways we might be good citizens.

    Paul said, “First of all, then, I urge that entreaties and prayers, petitions and thanksgivings, be made on behalf of all men, for kings and all who are in authority.” (verses 1-2).

  • It was another poet who said, “All I have is a voice.” But it was Maya Angelou, poet, author and so much more, who gave full-throated life to that idea in 86 years that almost defy description.

    Her death this week at her North Carolina home was a seismic event to the fans she accrued through a public life that had almost as many panels as a quilt: Writer, performer, award-winner, Oprah mentor, on one level; witness, conscience, teacher, activist, on a deeper one.

  •  Memorial Day may be the unofficial kick-off to summer, but as we ready for the upcoming holiday weekend, it is vital that we never forget it is much more than that. It is also a time when we as a nation pause to mourn and to reflect upon those men and women who paid the ultimate price defending our freedom.

    The holiday is nearing its 150th anniversary, and given that it came about in the wake of the Civil War, it seems appropriate that there is still some debate between the North and South about its exact origin.

  • I’m accustomed now to critics’ misleading statements about the Affordable Care Act, but a recent editorial in this newspaper was so breathtakingly disingenuous that it demands a factual response. That a newspaper of this size would trot out such unsubstantiated tripe disguised as analysis is a disservice to its readers.

  • Last week the Paducah Sun published a picture of Health and Family Services Secretary Audrey Haynes holding a sign aside a beaming Gov. Steve Beshear proclaiming that 413,410 people have enrolled in Kentucky's Obamacare program. We suspect the reason Beshear is joyous is because he knows it will fall to a future governor to deal with the financial mess he has created.

  •   There is a bag of garbage on the side of Bardstown Road that has been there many months.

    Who should I report it to?

    ~•~

  • Governments have always tried to placate their citizenries by pledging to solve problems, but their attempts only serve to exacerbate the problems they set out to fix.

  • Senator Carroll Gibson’s Legislative Update

     

    The second week of April is the last week of the Governor’s 10-day veto period. The 14th and 15th, both chambers return to Frankfort and take up any final action on bills, including the budget bills, if there are disagreements with the Governor’s potential vetoes. During this period, it is quiet around the capitol. This week several members came to Frankfort to meet about pending legislation, and continue to discuss the Road Plan, which has not yet come to the floor for a vote.