• Here is your reminder: Summer will be gone before you know it!

    So you have been warned. Time to get out the Summer Bucket List and do the things that you will regret if you do not get something accomplished Yet Again This Year.

    Those things that cannot be done in cooler weather, those things that cannot be done with the kids once school starts again and those things that cannot be regained, once they are gone.

    I thought I would share my Bucket List for this summer.

  • I enjoyed listening to Andy Beshear speak at the local rotary club meeting last Thursday. Beshear is running for attorney general and stopped by Hodgenville on the campaign trail.

    Beshear’s speech was centered around three main issues that he said Kentuckians were struggling with the most. Those issues were the child abuse epidemic, drug epidemic and the increasing amount of scams across the state.

    While all three are major issues that need to be addressed, the issue that struck home with me the most was the drug epidemic.

  •     What if only one person from every county in Kentucky decided to go vote after all on election day? Would we be facing a recanvass this Thursday? The Republican Gubernatorial race was won unofficially by 83 votes, and there are 120 counties in Kentucky. I wonder....

  • We take Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway at his word when he says he thinks Kentucky's ban on same-sex marriage is discriminatory. He says he believes the state's constitutional amendment forbidding recognition of such unions will be overturned by the U.S. Supreme Court, which heard arguments on the matter last week. He may well be right.

    But we don't think his personal views on the subject, no matter how sincere, excuse him from refusing to defend the law on the state's behalf in his capacity as attorney general.

  • As USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) continues its third year in its refueling and complex overhaul in Newport News, Virginia, we will see the enhancements to more than 80 percent of our spaces. From the top of the island superstructure to the lowest deck of the aircraft carrier, practically every space will witness some form of rework.

  • FRANKFORT – Kentucky may be a couple of thousand miles away from Hollywood, but that hasn’t diminished our connections to the entertainment industry. Some of today’s most famous actors, for example – George Clooney, Jennifer Lawrence and Johnny Depp – were born here, while Tom Cruise spent part of his youth in Louisville.

  •  I’ll start by saying none of this was spurred by anyone I know personally, so if we’re friends, don’t take offense. They were, however, inspired by members of the public.

  •  Although it may not be the last word on the matter, many library officials around Kentucky must be feeling a bit more confident about the future of their institutions following a Friday ruling from the state Court of Appeals.

    A three-judge appellate panel unanimously overturned two lower court decisions involving revenue increases for libraries created by petition.

  • I read in last week’s newspaper that City Hall  will be closing at 4:30 p.m.
    Will they be taking comments from the public before they change the closing time?

    No. City Council voted unanimously to start closing the office at 4:30 p.m. effective April 1.
    The next council meeting is 7 p.m. April 13. Call City Hall in advance at 270-358-3832 if you want to be added to the agenda.
    Why didn’t you run the answer to the online poll question last week?

  •   Anyone who has been in office for any amount of time will tell you that you need to quickly develop a thick skin.

    Public officials need to remember that they were elected to represent their districts, not their supporters. That will include hearing from those with opposing viewpoints and talking out differences, often in a public forum.

  •  Is there a turning lane at the end of Lincoln Parkway (the light at Hardee’s/McDonalds) when you turn right onto U.S. 31-E? Each day I stop at the light with my turn signal on to turn right only to have cars drive by in the emergency lane and turn before I have the chance. Once or twice I have almost hit them in the side before I realize they are there. If this is an actual turning lane, maybe it should be marked so we all know which lane to get in to turn.


  • Washington DC – The Navy Reserve will mark its centennial anniversary on March 3 with a series of events starting in Washington DC and continuing at installations around the country during the year. The events will highlight the history of the Navy Reserve and the remarkable contributions Reserve Sailors have made to the nation’s security.

  • It’s not BREAKING news that last week’s snow and ice weather event was challenging for all of us trying to get from home to work, to the grocery, doctor’s appointments, etc., but it was a challenge for our team as well, getting your local news out to you on a timely manner.

  • It has been a process that has taken years, but at long last, one of the most historic cemeteries in LaRue County has a proper marker.

    On Feb. 12, 2015, as part of the Lincoln Birthday Celebration, a marker, donated by the Captain Jacob Van Meter Chapter, National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, was unveiled on Leafdale Road. (The actual ceremony took place at Ovesen Heights Baptist Church, due to inclement weather.)

  • Madison “Mac” Mather died, at the age of 100, on Friday the 13th.

    Many of us think it would be lucky indeed to live to that ripe old age –especially if we could stay in our own homes as did Mr. Mather.

    No matter how old we grow, few of us will reach the legendary status of Mr. Mather. He was the embodiment of the very best country songs.

    I don’t think he would have minded being described in such terms. The last time we spoke, he talked about his love of music and how he loved to call square dances in his younger days.

  • I completely missed it.

    Last week, as I was doing a little research on the history of Hodgenville (remember, three years until the bicentennial), I came across a clipping of an event that occurred 100 years ago.

    A fire destroyed much of downtown Hodgenville on April 28, 1914. Twenty-six businesses in the northwest quadrant of Lincoln Square turned to ashes that night. The event put a damper on the City’s 100th year celebration.

    Most of the businesses that were rebuilt can be seen on the square today.

  • It has been seven years since the nation observed the bicentennial of the birth of Abraham Lincoln.

    Local celebrations, which included the national kickoff in February 2008 and the release of a new Lincoln penny the following year, were squashed by ice storms. The weather was a disappointment, but the community – the birthplace of arguably the greatest American president – pulled together and put on a party for Abe.

    Another bicentennial is on the horizon.

  • Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

    And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

    I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

  •   I recently received a packet from the mayor’s office, informing me that I needed to purchase a business license. The letter went on to say that any rent received from rental property in the City of Hodgenville is now subject to occupational taxes.

      I do not understand this. When was this law passed ... or is it just being imposed by our new mayor?

      If passed by the council, when and how did each councilman vote? I have not seen anything in the local paper about this new law.



  • Although there is no doubt that we still have a long way to go to recover fully from the national recession that began seven years ago, there have been some encouraging signs in recent days.

    Early last week, for example, the U.S. Commerce Department reported that the economy grew by five percent between July and September, the fastest quarterly uptick in a decade.