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Opinion

  • December is shaping up as a somewhat Orwellian month in the realm of free speech.

    In Washington, the Supreme Court decided to take up the issue of whether states can deny permission for specialty license plates that have a logo or message that might offend some people. Given that states cannot ban stuff like pornography on the grounds it might offend some people, one would think the answer to that question would be no. But read on.

  • Home tour thanks

    The Hodgenville Woman’s Club thanks everyone who attended our home tour, the homeowners who so graciously put their beautifully decorated homes on tour and people who purchased raffle tickets.

    The winner of the raffle basket was Cindy Smith.

    The income from these events helps the club maintain their historic clubhouse.

    Opal Dail

    Publicity Chair

    Walk to End Alzheimer’s raises almost $60,000

  • I haven’t had a Christmas tree since 2007.

    I didn’t realize how much this bothered my three granddaughters until last week when they stayed with us a couple of days. They brought up the subject of the no-tree so many times that I went to the basement and dragged out a two-foot-tall tabletop tree-in-a-box.

    Thankfully, the lights still worked. But that wasn’t enough. They wanted ornaments. I told them to find something.

  • There is nothing about the death or near death of a child, at the hands of their caretaker, which can be viewed positively. Despite this sad and stark reality, we at Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky are encouraged by the release of the second annual report from the Child Fatality and Near Fatality External Review Panel. This report reflects the work of a dedicated and voluntary multi-disciplinary group of professionals (including a PCAK representative). The Panel’s commitment to data driven, solution focused recommendations are readily apparent in this report.

  • I was speaking with a longtime friend the other day and he commented: “It seems to me that our community has lost a lot of ‘the good, ol’ people’ lately.”

    I had to agree. The obituary page in The LaRue County Herald News has been full of names of people who have been mainstays of goodness, kindness and charity. Some of them much older than me – others not so much.

    It seems their deaths cluster around holidays – something that has puzzled me for years.

  • Thanksgiving is an oft-forgotten holiday. It’s sandwiched right between Halloween and Christmas, the two most marketed, celebrated holidays of the year, and generally, we don’t get or give presents on Thanksgiving. The gift of this holiday is time.

    Time with family, time to stop and reflect on what we have and time to slow down and eat a meal with those we may not see very often.

  • The only sounds that Kentucky football’s Class of 2014 was supposed to cause were Air Raid sirens and cheering on Saturday afternoons.

    Now, after a Sunday night in September, four of them (Dorian Baker, Stanley Boom Williams, Drew Barker and Tymere Dubose) will instead be known for the sound of three airsoft guns being shot into the air in the middle of South Campus, and the subsequent pinging of 30,000 students’ cell phones alerting them to a campus-wide lockdown.

  • My mother, who has been gone for 10 years, performed magic every Thanksgiving.

    Somehow, she managed to have ripe, garden-grown tomatoes on the table, year after year. They were always the last ones of the season and we knew we’d have to wait another seven or eight months for the next taste.

    A ripe tomato on an Old Town Blue Corelle plate, surrounded by a slice of turkey and a pile of homemade mashed potatoes and green beans seasoned with a bit of bacon: If there is anything better on Thanksgiving – I don’t know what it is.

  • The Indisposable Concept is a photography project based out of Australia, in which people use disposable cameras to take pictures of what they consider “indisposable.” Basically, they want you to document the world around you via the lens of a disposable camera. Afterward, you’re supposed to send the pictures to them, either by email or by mailing in the camera itself. They then post the pictures on their website and social media accounts.

    It started in Australia, but has since garnered a worldwide following.

  • My daughter is a NICU (neonatal intensive-care unit) nurse who takes care of some of the tiniest, most fragile babies born in the state. She has never disclosed a name or even hinted at anything that would violate the privacy of her patients. But I can tell – by the few things she has said – it is a difficult job.

    Most of her patients thrive and are able to go home. Some of the families do not get that happy ending. My daughter is sometimes called upon to care for the little ones after they have died.

  • November is National Hospice Month

    With 15 years of experience caring for patients with life-limiting illnesses, I have gained valuable insights into end-of-life issues and the benefits of choosing hospice care sooner.

  • I was raised on a dirt road. Lots of folks were. That’s rural, all right.

    I’ve never been ashamed of the fact – but the name-calling I’ve heard since last week’s election is proof enough that some people think I should be.

    Several commentators have lashed out at the counties that supported U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell, labeling them as “racist,” “poor,” “ignorant” and “self-defeating.”

  • I’ve always said writing isn’t something I decided to do. It’s just something I did. Of course, there were teachers, professors, friends and mentors along the way to give me encouragement or advice. But no one ever had to force me to write.

  • I had the privilege of speaking to four classes of first-graders last week at Hodgenville Elementary School.

    Naughty or nice? Only Santa knows for sure – but the students were well behaved at school.

    And speaking of the Jolly Old Elf ... that was the subject we all wanted to talk about at HES.

    That’s right ... it’s time to start thinking about Santa letters. There is a lot to do before we publish our annual Christmas edition.

  • SPM Wire – With breast cancer currently the second most common cancer in women, according to government health statistics, awareness and early detection are crucial for treatment outcomes. With this in mind, every October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month – a time to raise awareness of the disease and funds for research and treatment.

    While most women are aware of the disease, many fail to take steps to detect breast cancer in its early stages, say the experts at the National Breast Cancer Foundation.

  • It’s a great time here at The LaRue County Herald News. We would like to announce that we have officially relocated our offices to a newly remodeled expanded space, right next door to where our office has been located since 1992.

    You still come in the same door, except now you just come straight ahead and Administrative Assistant Hazel Hinton will be there to great you with a great big smile.

    The new space allows for much needed office space for all the staff, and a private conference and interview room as well.

  • The public has a right to know.

    It has a right to know how taxpayer dollars are spent, whether government meetings are being conducted properly and fairly, and if government leaders are open to questions and scrutiny.

    It’s important to note that anyone can challenge (respectfully) a community leader – or the way a public meeting is being conducted. You do not have to be an employee of a newspaper, as someone suggested to me a couple of weeks ago.

  • It was June 1984. I was two weeks out of high school and walking into my first job interview. I had grown up in the Buffalo area with a great love for reading and writing, but all the work I had done so far in my life revolved around mowing yards, helping farmers put up hay, and assisting my Dad move heavy pianos. I had never yet held a public job. I was 17 – and nervous as a cat.

  • The Lincoln Days Festival was a success once again.

    The Lincoln Days Committee continued the tradition of tried-and-true events like the pioneer games, quilt show, parade and look-alike contests. There were several improvements – such as the 1,001 pieces of children’s artwork adorning the windows in businesses along Lincoln Boulevard. The contest is always fun – but this year the students and their teachers outdid themselves.

    My favorite? Lincoln as a superhero.