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Opinion

  • A few months ago, I was invited to become an at-large board member of the Kentucky Press Association. I’ve learned a lot at the few meetings I’ve attended – which is always a good thing.

    On a couple of occasions, I’ve felt very out of place. There are several representatives from the state’s largest dailies on that board – and their experiences and outlooks are different from mine.

  • We pray for God to bless America, but God has already shed his love, mercy and grace upon our land. It is our turn to bless America.

    But how?

    We can bless America by being good citizens, being patriotic, obeying the laws, paying our taxes and voting. The Apostle Paul many years ago in I Timothy 2:1-6 gave some ways we might be good citizens.

    Paul said, “First of all, then, I urge that entreaties and prayers, petitions and thanksgivings, be made on behalf of all men, for kings and all who are in authority.” (verses 1-2).

  • It was another poet who said, “All I have is a voice.” But it was Maya Angelou, poet, author and so much more, who gave full-throated life to that idea in 86 years that almost defy description.

    Her death this week at her North Carolina home was a seismic event to the fans she accrued through a public life that had almost as many panels as a quilt: Writer, performer, award-winner, Oprah mentor, on one level; witness, conscience, teacher, activist, on a deeper one.

  •  Memorial Day may be the unofficial kick-off to summer, but as we ready for the upcoming holiday weekend, it is vital that we never forget it is much more than that. It is also a time when we as a nation pause to mourn and to reflect upon those men and women who paid the ultimate price defending our freedom.

    The holiday is nearing its 150th anniversary, and given that it came about in the wake of the Civil War, it seems appropriate that there is still some debate between the North and South about its exact origin.

  • I’m accustomed now to critics’ misleading statements about the Affordable Care Act, but a recent editorial in this newspaper was so breathtakingly disingenuous that it demands a factual response. That a newspaper of this size would trot out such unsubstantiated tripe disguised as analysis is a disservice to its readers.

  • Last week the Paducah Sun published a picture of Health and Family Services Secretary Audrey Haynes holding a sign aside a beaming Gov. Steve Beshear proclaiming that 413,410 people have enrolled in Kentucky's Obamacare program. We suspect the reason Beshear is joyous is because he knows it will fall to a future governor to deal with the financial mess he has created.

  •   There is a bag of garbage on the side of Bardstown Road that has been there many months.

    Who should I report it to?

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  • Governments have always tried to placate their citizenries by pledging to solve problems, but their attempts only serve to exacerbate the problems they set out to fix.

  • Senator Carroll Gibson’s Legislative Update

     

    The second week of April is the last week of the Governor’s 10-day veto period. The 14th and 15th, both chambers return to Frankfort and take up any final action on bills, including the budget bills, if there are disagreements with the Governor’s potential vetoes. During this period, it is quiet around the capitol. This week several members came to Frankfort to meet about pending legislation, and continue to discuss the Road Plan, which has not yet come to the floor for a vote.

  •   Why are the mayor and city clerk still on the job?

    If they were employed by any other business or company they would have been fired months ago.

    ~•~

  •  The decision out of Franklin Circuit Court that the Bluegrass Pipeline does not have the power of eminent domain shows that, at least in one branch of government, private citizens’ rights are still important.

    In his summary judgment against Bluegrass Pipeline, Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip J. Shepherd ruled March 25 that the pipeline was not “in public service,” and therefore not eligible to have the government seize private property against the will of landowners.

  • What is the salary of the LaRue County PVA?

    ~•~

    According to the State Local Finance Officer (Department of Local Government), an incoming property valuation officer in LaRue County will earn $76,264.12.

    (Editor’s note: A new judge/executive, sheriff, county clerk and jailer would make the same salary – as set by the state.)

  •  How much did the restroom facility at Creek Front Park cost? Was the contract bid? What contractor was awarded the project?

    ~•~

    The restroom facility was part of a matching grant program from the Department of Local Government. It cost $24,692 with the City of Hodgenville matching the grant with in-kind labor. The City acted as its own general contractor and purchased the construction materials, according to City Clerk/Treasurer MaDonna Hornback.

    Several local construction firms/workers were hired to do the work.

  •  In November 2004, Kentuckians overwhelmingly passed an amendment to Kentucky’s constitution that said marriage shall be between one man and one woman. A legal status identical or substantially similar to that of marriage for unmarried individuals shall not be valid or recognized, the constitution states.

    During that year, 13 states passed similar amendments. Many of these amendments were in large part because activist judges, mainly in the Northeast, were overriding the people’s will and allowing gay marriage in those states.

  • I was in the left turning lane at the intersection by Hardee’s recently. I sat there for nine minutes and watched other lights keep changing – but mine never did. I finally ran the red light after I made sure no one was coming. That is not the first time I have had to sit at that red light for what seemed like forever.
    I even put my car in reverse to move back a little, thinking I wasn’t in the right place to trigger the light to change – but it didn’t make a difference.
    What is the deal?

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  •  Shirley Childress provided insight for last week’s Just Ask question about the 1940 Census.

  •  Seven years after the General Assembly voted overwhelmingly to raise the state’s minimum wage, the Kentucky House of Representatives returned to the issue on Thursday when it passed legislation that follows a similar path taken by that 2007 law.

    This is an issue that is drawing a lot of attention across the country. The National Conference of State Legislatures says 23 states considered raising it 2013, and Kentucky is one of 20 doing the same this year, with more expected in the months ahead.

  •  Census question

  •  If one Kentucky legislator has his way, many Kentuckians could lose access to public information related to their local governing bodies.

  • Oklahoma-based Williams Co. and Texas-based Boardwalk Pipeline Partners want to build a pipeline to pump natural gas liquids across the commonwealth. The partnership expects it will not be able to negotiate sales with 2 percent of landowners along the route.