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Opinion

  • Washington DC – The Navy Reserve will mark its centennial anniversary on March 3 with a series of events starting in Washington DC and continuing at installations around the country during the year. The events will highlight the history of the Navy Reserve and the remarkable contributions Reserve Sailors have made to the nation’s security.

  • It’s not BREAKING news that last week’s snow and ice weather event was challenging for all of us trying to get from home to work, to the grocery, doctor’s appointments, etc., but it was a challenge for our team as well, getting your local news out to you on a timely manner.

  • It has been a process that has taken years, but at long last, one of the most historic cemeteries in LaRue County has a proper marker.

    On Feb. 12, 2015, as part of the Lincoln Birthday Celebration, a marker, donated by the Captain Jacob Van Meter Chapter, National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution, was unveiled on Leafdale Road. (The actual ceremony took place at Ovesen Heights Baptist Church, due to inclement weather.)

  • Madison “Mac” Mather died, at the age of 100, on Friday the 13th.

    Many of us think it would be lucky indeed to live to that ripe old age –especially if we could stay in our own homes as did Mr. Mather.

    No matter how old we grow, few of us will reach the legendary status of Mr. Mather. He was the embodiment of the very best country songs.

    I don’t think he would have minded being described in such terms. The last time we spoke, he talked about his love of music and how he loved to call square dances in his younger days.

  • I completely missed it.

    Last week, as I was doing a little research on the history of Hodgenville (remember, three years until the bicentennial), I came across a clipping of an event that occurred 100 years ago.

    A fire destroyed much of downtown Hodgenville on April 28, 1914. Twenty-six businesses in the northwest quadrant of Lincoln Square turned to ashes that night. The event put a damper on the City’s 100th year celebration.

    Most of the businesses that were rebuilt can be seen on the square today.

  • It has been seven years since the nation observed the bicentennial of the birth of Abraham Lincoln.

    Local celebrations, which included the national kickoff in February 2008 and the release of a new Lincoln penny the following year, were squashed by ice storms. The weather was a disappointment, but the community – the birthplace of arguably the greatest American president – pulled together and put on a party for Abe.

    Another bicentennial is on the horizon.

  • Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

    And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

    I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

  •   I recently received a packet from the mayor’s office, informing me that I needed to purchase a business license. The letter went on to say that any rent received from rental property in the City of Hodgenville is now subject to occupational taxes.

      I do not understand this. When was this law passed ... or is it just being imposed by our new mayor?

      If passed by the council, when and how did each councilman vote? I have not seen anything in the local paper about this new law.

     

     ~•~

  • Although there is no doubt that we still have a long way to go to recover fully from the national recession that began seven years ago, there have been some encouraging signs in recent days.

    Early last week, for example, the U.S. Commerce Department reported that the economy grew by five percent between July and September, the fastest quarterly uptick in a decade.

  • Many thanks, once again, to that band of intrepid volunteers – Santa’s Helpers – who have braved the weather, the traffic and an aging Rudolf bus for the last 48 years to bring smiles to hundreds of local children.
    They have given up their own family’s Christmas Eve to make the holidays brighter for others. In fact, the Santa Run has turned into a family tradition for many of them. While they may get discouraged, they never give up. And the memories they make and receive are priceless.
     

  • Saturday, Dec. 27 was a very special day. It was the day when two of the state’s top teams, ranked #1 and #4, were playing. It also was the 65th anniversary for two special people.

    R.B. and Mary Smith were married on Dec. 27, 1949, at the courthouse in Munfordville. They have four sons, John, Craig, Tony (Tess), and Brian (Sharon); three grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

    R.B. and Mary are residents at Sunrise Manor Nursing Home.

  • History teaches us two things: what works and what doesn’t. After over 200 years of experience, we know definitively what has worked for America. We also know just as definitively, what has caused other countries to fail.

    America was the first country in history to be founded exclusively on individual freedom. It was an experiment never before done. The outcome was unknown. Today we do know with certainty the wildly successful impact freedom has on people. Americans have created the highest standard of living, along with the best quality of life in human history.

  • I’m not really very good with words.

    Sure, I write for a living, but that doesn’t mean I’m actually good at conveying my own thoughts with any sort of succinctness. It’s especially bad when I’m speaking the words out loud. I get caught up, tongue-tied and dry-mouthed. If I mispronounce something, I just lose my mind, apparently, because it’s all downhill from there.

    The one time in my life that I felt I accurately expressed my feelings via the spoken word was the tallest order I’ve ever been given: my wedding vows.

  • The Pew Research Center recently reported that nearly three-quarters of Americans are OK with religious displays on public property. Apparently, America still has room at the Inn, or at least the public square for baby Jesus and a nativity scene. Only 20 percent according to the survey say that such displays should never be permitted. Must be Grinches, all of them.

  • December is shaping up as a somewhat Orwellian month in the realm of free speech.

    In Washington, the Supreme Court decided to take up the issue of whether states can deny permission for specialty license plates that have a logo or message that might offend some people. Given that states cannot ban stuff like pornography on the grounds it might offend some people, one would think the answer to that question would be no. But read on.

  • Home tour thanks

    The Hodgenville Woman’s Club thanks everyone who attended our home tour, the homeowners who so graciously put their beautifully decorated homes on tour and people who purchased raffle tickets.

    The winner of the raffle basket was Cindy Smith.

    The income from these events helps the club maintain their historic clubhouse.

    Opal Dail

    Publicity Chair

    Walk to End Alzheimer’s raises almost $60,000

  • I haven’t had a Christmas tree since 2007.

    I didn’t realize how much this bothered my three granddaughters until last week when they stayed with us a couple of days. They brought up the subject of the no-tree so many times that I went to the basement and dragged out a two-foot-tall tabletop tree-in-a-box.

    Thankfully, the lights still worked. But that wasn’t enough. They wanted ornaments. I told them to find something.

  • There is nothing about the death or near death of a child, at the hands of their caretaker, which can be viewed positively. Despite this sad and stark reality, we at Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky are encouraged by the release of the second annual report from the Child Fatality and Near Fatality External Review Panel. This report reflects the work of a dedicated and voluntary multi-disciplinary group of professionals (including a PCAK representative). The Panel’s commitment to data driven, solution focused recommendations are readily apparent in this report.

  • I was speaking with a longtime friend the other day and he commented: “It seems to me that our community has lost a lot of ‘the good, ol’ people’ lately.”

    I had to agree. The obituary page in The LaRue County Herald News has been full of names of people who have been mainstays of goodness, kindness and charity. Some of them much older than me – others not so much.

    It seems their deaths cluster around holidays – something that has puzzled me for years.

  • Thanksgiving is an oft-forgotten holiday. It’s sandwiched right between Halloween and Christmas, the two most marketed, celebrated holidays of the year, and generally, we don’t get or give presents on Thanksgiving. The gift of this holiday is time.

    Time with family, time to stop and reflect on what we have and time to slow down and eat a meal with those we may not see very often.