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Features

  • Although the U.S. Navy didn’t lift the ban on women serving on submarines until 2010, Helen Carroll, a resident at Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Hodgenville, rode a sub through the Panama Canal in 1951.

  • While Jerry Williams and Ken Baldwin were putting the finishing touches to their Christmas CD, “Strings and Bows,” last year at Williams’ home on North Lincoln Boulevard in Hodgenville, the two planted a seed idea for another album of a completely different nature.
    “I’m a Civil War buff and, since the War occurred 150 years ago, I thought that putting together a mixture of traditional and original songs with a flavor of the period would be a timely project,” said Williams.

  • Although Magnolia resident Tickle Ragland and Sharon Meisenheimer, who lives in Walnut, Ill., have exchanged letters for 65 years, neither pen pal knew until recently that Sharon’s husband Lester has relatives buried in LaRue County.
    “We knew Lester’s grandparents came from Hodgenville and moved to Illinois where they were buried, but we didn’t know where the rest of his family was buried,” Sharon said.  

  • The need for blood is constant. In fact every two seconds someone in the U.S. is in need.
    That’s why on the second Tuesday of every other month, downtown Hodgenville is lined with signs urging people to donate blood at the Hodgenville Woman’s Club.
    “It’s a simple, but life saving process,” said Volunteer Coordinator Faye Puyear “The actual giving blood part only takes eight to 10 minutes.”

  • Story courtesy of The Greensburg Record Herald

  • Jim Routt of Sonora worked construction for 35 years. When he retired at 65, he stopped building frames and began building fires for barbecue.

    Along with his barbecue business, Bucksnort Barbeque, he also volunteers with Carpenters for Christ.

    Routt, 68, has lived in Hardin County most of his life. He lived outside the county for 10 years when he served in the U.S. Navy and worked for a telephone company in Florida. In 1969, he moved back to Hardin County and started to work in the construction business.

  • Since the day she entered her first clogging class in 1990, dancing has been a way of providing, fun, fitness and fellowship for Bonita Pendleton.
    In the past three years, however, even her passion for clogging and the stress relief that was its partner have lost their luster as Pendleton has experienced the death of her husband and her two daughters.
    “I’m just trying to sort out my life right now,” she said. “I’m trying to put it all back together.”

  • On the day this summer that Jimmy Hornback and William Hutcherson received commissions as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army they found out that their grandfathers had also entered the service together in January 1945.
    Haynes Allen, Hornback’s grandfather, and Eugene Hutcherson, William’s grandparent, mustered in Hodgenville with 19 other inductees to leave for basic training in the waning months of World War II.

  • Hodgenville native Henry Miller may very well be the number one University of Kentucky basketball fan in the world. He lives, breathes and claims to bleed the color blue.
    According to Miller the idea to begin collecting U.K. things stemmed from his late mother. His mother told him one day in 1986 that he should begin a Wildcat room.

  • Ever since Shari Mabe watched and heard LaRue County’s Grimes family “jamming” to Bluegrass and gospel music at their house in 1998, she has had a desire to learn to play the acoustic guitar.
    Judging from the noted musicians she has been keeping company with lately, the Dangerfield Road resident has learned to pick that six-stringed instrument very well, thank you.

  • When former district judge James Bondurant was a young man, he had two main goals: to marry the prettiest girl on earth and to become a country lawyer.
    That mission has been accomplished on both counts, according to the 81-year-old judge who has spent most of his life as a LaRue County resident. He found the prettiest girl in the former Kaye Keyes of Lexington, whom he married in 1952.  And, before becoming a judge, he practiced law in Hardin and LaRue counties, fulfilling his second goal.

  • Sunrise Manor Nursing Home, now a Signature-managed healthcare facility, has set a new record for the facility.
    Last week, during a two-day period, three residents were discharged to home. None of the current staff can recall that many people, in such a short timeframe, returning home from the long-term care facility in its 44-year history.
    “I think a lot of people have the misconception that if they come into the nursing home, they won’t leave,” said Mark Burba, staff physical therapist. “That’s not necessarily true.”

  • After the stories are written, ads placed, paper printed and circulars inserted, The LaRue County Herald News makes its way to the newsstands. However, its journey getting there deserves a story itself.

  • Carl Howell, Hodgen­ville attorney, author, authority on Abraham Lincoln and vintage postcard collector, has added several local school yearbooks, some more than 100 years old, to his collection of LaRue County history.
    The books, which include annuals of two of the three colleges that once flourished in the county as well as high schools, provide not only a record of the students who attended long ago, but also insight into LaRue County’s educational and social status of a century ago.

  • In addition to a collection of vintage college annuals, Hodgenville attorney and historian Carl Howell also has several old yearbooks from Hodgenville High School, with one, published in 1917, claiming to be the first.
    That 1916-17 annual waxed poetic throughout. Its preface gives some idea of the post-Victorian verbiage inside: “This is an invitation to come and drink at the fountain of pure information concerning our school. This, the first annual, is bubbling over with everything pertaining to school life.”

  • Kenneth and Rita Gibson will celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary June 12. A Mass will be said by Father Mike Tobin at Our Lady of Mercy Catholic Church. They were married June 16 at St. Ann’s in Howards­town. They have six children: Kenny Ray, Eu­genia Butler, Dor­man, Joey, Venita Haw­k­ins and Viola Hawkins; 12 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren, and one on the way.

  • Charles and Loretta Devers of Hodgenville will celebrate their 65th anniversary June 4. The couple married June 4, 1946 at West End Baptist Church in Louisville. They have two daughters, Carol Teeples and Rebecca Gray; six grandsons; and eight great-grandchildren.

  • W.L. and Pam Miller of Magnolia would like to announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter Lesley Anne Miller to Wesley Edward Moore.
    The prospective bride is a graduate of Western Kentucky University and works as a registered nurse in Bowling Green.
    The prospective groom is the son of Leon and Betty Jean Moore of Hartford. He will be attending medical school at Pikeville College this fall.
    The wedding will be June 18 at Federal Grover Bed and Breakfast in Auburn. Formal invitations have been sent.

  • The descendants of Everett and Kate Jaggers of Magnolia gathered for a reunion May 1 at Hodgenville First Baptist Church. There were approximately 103 in attendance. Everett was born Nov. 30, 1871 and died June 22, 1954. Kate was born Nov. 1, 1871 and died Jan. 6, 1955. They had seven daughters, Ollie, Bertha, Virgie, Sallie, Mary, Iva Belle and Pauline; 33 grandchildren; and many other descendants.

  • Josh and Emily Morris of Lexington announce the birth of a daughter, Hadley Grace Morris, born Jan. 29, 2011.  
    Hadley was welcomed home by her older sister, Riley Morris.  
    Maternal grandparents are Jeff and Cindy Heady of Magnolia. Paternal grandparents are Mary Gaines Locke and Dale Morris of Hodgenville. Great-grandparents are Bobby and Ruby Heady of Hodgenville, Anna Mae Miller of Magnolia and Bernice Morris of Hodgenville.