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Features

  • For Eli Whitlock, a cancer diagnosis led him to one of the healthiest times in his life.
    The 25-year-old Magnolia resident lost more than 100 pounds after deciding to change his lifestyle after receiving a cancer diagnosis four years ago.
    Whitlock was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the summer of 2008 and had surgery days after learning of the disease. He didn’t need any other treatment to become cancer-free and he felt he “got off pretty lucky with that,” he said.

  •  Hazel Denham has learned in her 70 years of hairdressing experience that customers tend to love the styles they wore when they were young.

    She is no exception with her careful posture, crossed legs and simple but neat blouse and dress pants. Her favorite hairstyle is from the 1930s – a smooth permanent press associated with early-20th century glamour.

    The 91-year-old Hodgenville resident has seen the death and resurgence of many looks, including the French twist and the page boy, since she saved for her first permanent wave machine in the 1930s.

  •  When Hazel Denham walked into a beauty salon in Glasgow for her first-ever permanent as a sophomore at Temple Hill High School, she knew then and there what she wanted as a career.

    “There was just something about the friendliness in the shop, the interesting way the operator fixed not only mine but others' hair, I just felt I had a knack for it, and from that day I decided to be a beautician.”

    Her career prediction proved to be accurate as she has styled hair at Hodgenville's Powder Puff for 61 years and has owned it for over 55 years.

  • For Eli Whitlock, a cancer diagnosis led him to one of the healthiest times in his life.

    The 25-year-old Magnolia resident lost more than 100 pounds after deciding to change his lifestyle after receiving a cancer diagnosis four years ago.

    Whitlock was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the summer of 2008 and had surgery days after learning of the disease. He didn't need any other treatment to become cancer-free and he felt he "got off pretty lucky with that," he said.

  •  How does it feel to be 100?

  •  December 2011 marked another milestone in American history as the last U.S. combat troops withdrew from Iraq, ending nine years of fighting that saw over 4,000 American fatalities.

  • Vanessa McFarland is thankful to be alive, and in her opinion, it is because of the free services offered to her through the Community Health Clinic of Hardin and LaRue Counties.
    McFarland, who is battling ailments including type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and thyroid issues, began going to the clinic about six years ago.
    With no health insurance, little income and the need for treatment of her chronic conditions, a friend recommended she schedule an appointment at the community clinic.

  • It’s often said that firefighters belong to a certain “brotherhood.” They work together for a common cause, share cookouts, family functions, business ventures and many other day-to-day activities.
    However, LaRue County/Hodgenville Fire Departments go a step further into the commonalities shared by these individuals.
    Of about 30-35 firefighters who make up the departments’ rosters, 14 of those men and women share the experience with their spouse and even more share it with their families.

  • During this Christmas season when gifts are on the mind of most people, Kelly Clark is thankful that she has received a special present that is free and yet priceless – the gift of life.

    “The doctor told me that I should be dead, that I should have bled out,” Clark, 29, said, remembering a car accident on an icy LaRue County road Feb. 21, 2009, that left her with a severed carotid artery, multiple facial fractures, a broken collarbone, fractured shoulder blade and bleeding on her brain.

  • Although the U.S. Navy didn’t lift the ban on women serving on submarines until 2010, Helen Carroll, a resident at Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Hodgenville, rode a sub through the Panama Canal in 1951.

  • While Jerry Williams and Ken Baldwin were putting the finishing touches to their Christmas CD, “Strings and Bows,” last year at Williams’ home on North Lincoln Boulevard in Hodgenville, the two planted a seed idea for another album of a completely different nature.
    “I’m a Civil War buff and, since the War occurred 150 years ago, I thought that putting together a mixture of traditional and original songs with a flavor of the period would be a timely project,” said Williams.

  • Although Magnolia resident Tickle Ragland and Sharon Meisenheimer, who lives in Walnut, Ill., have exchanged letters for 65 years, neither pen pal knew until recently that Sharon’s husband Lester has relatives buried in LaRue County.
    “We knew Lester’s grandparents came from Hodgenville and moved to Illinois where they were buried, but we didn’t know where the rest of his family was buried,” Sharon said.  

  • The need for blood is constant. In fact every two seconds someone in the U.S. is in need.
    That’s why on the second Tuesday of every other month, downtown Hodgenville is lined with signs urging people to donate blood at the Hodgenville Woman’s Club.
    “It’s a simple, but life saving process,” said Volunteer Coordinator Faye Puyear “The actual giving blood part only takes eight to 10 minutes.”

  • Story courtesy of The Greensburg Record Herald

  • Jim Routt of Sonora worked construction for 35 years. When he retired at 65, he stopped building frames and began building fires for barbecue.

    Along with his barbecue business, Bucksnort Barbeque, he also volunteers with Carpenters for Christ.

    Routt, 68, has lived in Hardin County most of his life. He lived outside the county for 10 years when he served in the U.S. Navy and worked for a telephone company in Florida. In 1969, he moved back to Hardin County and started to work in the construction business.

  • Since the day she entered her first clogging class in 1990, dancing has been a way of providing, fun, fitness and fellowship for Bonita Pendleton.
    In the past three years, however, even her passion for clogging and the stress relief that was its partner have lost their luster as Pendleton has experienced the death of her husband and her two daughters.
    “I’m just trying to sort out my life right now,” she said. “I’m trying to put it all back together.”

  • On the day this summer that Jimmy Hornback and William Hutcherson received commissions as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army they found out that their grandfathers had also entered the service together in January 1945.
    Haynes Allen, Hornback’s grandfather, and Eugene Hutcherson, William’s grandparent, mustered in Hodgenville with 19 other inductees to leave for basic training in the waning months of World War II.

  • Hodgenville native Henry Miller may very well be the number one University of Kentucky basketball fan in the world. He lives, breathes and claims to bleed the color blue.
    According to Miller the idea to begin collecting U.K. things stemmed from his late mother. His mother told him one day in 1986 that he should begin a Wildcat room.

  • Ever since Shari Mabe watched and heard LaRue County’s Grimes family “jamming” to Bluegrass and gospel music at their house in 1998, she has had a desire to learn to play the acoustic guitar.
    Judging from the noted musicians she has been keeping company with lately, the Dangerfield Road resident has learned to pick that six-stringed instrument very well, thank you.