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Features

  • When recycling comes to mind, people often think about a neat and clean environment filled with organized storage containers for collection. However, that’s not always the case.
    Often overlooked is the not-so-clean side of things such as sorting, organizing, banding and shipping the products after processing.
    In 2011, LaRue County’s recycling center, better known as Renaissance Recycling, collected more than 500 tons of recyclable material and distributed it to select facilities across the state.

  •  Through the work of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kentuckiana, children all over the state are being positively impacted by one-to-one unique mentoring relationships. However, some children haven’t yet had their chance.

  • What began for Sonya Hill as an endeavor to inspire her two children to enjoy reading turned into a novel set in Hodgenville. 

  •  Cody Warren helped his daughter, 3-year-old Kaylee Mae, glue a tail on an Easter bunny cutout during Thursday’s Wee Time preschool program at Abraham Lincoln Elementary School. About 30 children attended the final session of the school year but they were joined by several other students in the KHIC (Kindergarten Here I Come) program.

  •  To see Charles Butler and his infectious, sometimes mischievous, grin you would never know he is battling chronic lymphocytic leukemia. But Charles is a survivor and he knows he is among the fortunate ones. 

  • Persuaded by a part-time farm hand working on the family grain and dairy farm, Dale Dobson, now safety coordinator for the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, joined the LaRue County Volunteer Fire Department.
    “Brad Miller was his name,” said Dobson. “He would always say, ‘come on man, join ... you’d really like doing this at night,’ so in February 1989 I finally did.”

  •  Congratulations to all the participants in the 4-H Poetry Contest. Participants are to be commended for their efforts. Eighty-three poems were entered and judged.

    The poems were divided into two age groups for judging. Junior division participants are ages 9-13 and the senior age division includes 14-18 year olds.

    The top 8 junior poems and the top 4 senior poems will advance to the District competition.

    These poems will also be published in the District 4-H Poetry Book. All winners will receive a copy of the poetry book.

     

  • Several LaRue County firefighters attended the 49th annual Dixie Fire School in Elizabethtown this weekend.
    The fire school held at the Elizabethtown Community and Technical College campus, had 805 people pre-registered for 2012 classes – a far cry from the 60 who attended the few classes offered in 1963.

  • “The easy part about cancer is being a survivor. The hard part is watching others go through it and not make it.”
    Those are the words of Susan Holt, co-captain of LaRue County Relay for Life’s Janet’s Angels team.
    The team, which has formerly been known as the “Tiki Hut Healers,” formed in 1997 in support of then 13-year-old Valerie Holt. Valerie was battling Wilms tumor.

  • Years of hard work and volunteerism are paying off for a LaRue County woman as she graduates with a specialized degree from Western Kentucky University.
    Ashley McWaters has become the first person in an eight-county span, known as Area 5 State Fire and Rescue Training District, to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in systems management fire administration.

  • When Cassandra “Cassie” Hornback was a little girl, she enjoyed “exploring” her backyard in Sonora with her grandmother.
    Her “Mammaw,” Norma Jean Rector, passed away last October and Hornback had the chance to go through some of her possessions. She was amazed at the treasures her Mammaw had saved from their adventures.
    The odd-shaped rocks and fossils that caught the eye of a little girl were a foreshadowing of Hornback’s current love: geology.

  • For Eli Whitlock, a cancer diagnosis led him to one of the healthiest times in his life.
    The 25-year-old Magnolia resident lost more than 100 pounds after deciding to change his lifestyle after receiving a cancer diagnosis four years ago.
    Whitlock was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the summer of 2008 and had surgery days after learning of the disease. He didn’t need any other treatment to become cancer-free and he felt he “got off pretty lucky with that,” he said.

  •  Hazel Denham has learned in her 70 years of hairdressing experience that customers tend to love the styles they wore when they were young.

    She is no exception with her careful posture, crossed legs and simple but neat blouse and dress pants. Her favorite hairstyle is from the 1930s – a smooth permanent press associated with early-20th century glamour.

    The 91-year-old Hodgenville resident has seen the death and resurgence of many looks, including the French twist and the page boy, since she saved for her first permanent wave machine in the 1930s.

  •  When Hazel Denham walked into a beauty salon in Glasgow for her first-ever permanent as a sophomore at Temple Hill High School, she knew then and there what she wanted as a career.

    “There was just something about the friendliness in the shop, the interesting way the operator fixed not only mine but others' hair, I just felt I had a knack for it, and from that day I decided to be a beautician.”

    Her career prediction proved to be accurate as she has styled hair at Hodgenville's Powder Puff for 61 years and has owned it for over 55 years.

  • For Eli Whitlock, a cancer diagnosis led him to one of the healthiest times in his life.

    The 25-year-old Magnolia resident lost more than 100 pounds after deciding to change his lifestyle after receiving a cancer diagnosis four years ago.

    Whitlock was diagnosed with testicular cancer in the summer of 2008 and had surgery days after learning of the disease. He didn't need any other treatment to become cancer-free and he felt he "got off pretty lucky with that," he said.

  •  How does it feel to be 100?