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Features

  •  If you are interested in the therapeutic program, riding lessons for your kids or anything else related to Wayne Ridge Farm, contact Jodi Johnson at (270) 320-5928.  

    Jodi Johnson rides horses in her sleep, kicking whoever is in bed with her as if she were nudging her horse. As someone who spends so much time with the animals, it comes as no surprise. 

  •  A new book by Nancy Barry goes deeply into the history of Kentucky, including LaRue County.  Lightning Bugs and Sunday School is a collection of stories and poems about growing up and living in the commonwealth. 

  •  The quilts cover the couch, the chairs – piled up in the closet and on a nearby recliner too.  Dozens of vibrantly colored and delicately made quilts help to personalize the home of Helen Clark. They are all creations of the soon-to-be 100-year old woman and they represent the long and rich life she has lived.

  •  Working at the 12th Evacuation Hospital in Cu Chi, Vietnam, in 1970, LaRue County native Charles Allen had seen the guts and gore of what war is really like, unlike the glory in which it is often portrayed.

  •  Steve Thompson could give lessons to whoever said, “If life gives you lemons, make lemonade.”

    Just when he was living the good life with success in music and real estate, he was besieged with a deluge of drawbacks, including two bouts of cancer and a disastrous economic downturn that would have caused most people to lose hope… but not Thompson.

    “The victory is in the fight,” the 53-year-old former Michigan resident said.

    Thompson was born in New York City but the family moved to a very rural Michigan farm in 1967.

  •  For 33 years senior citizens from far and near have found three and a half-hours of musical entertainment every Saturday night at LaRue County’s Senior Center located on Walters Avenue in Hodgenville.

    Part of the reason for that enjoyment, according to co-managers Charles and Viola Riggs, is that the performers as well as the audience feed off of each other’s enthusiasm.

  •  Murle Elliott has never been one to flit, like a bird, from job to job.

    When he was only 17 years old, he found a job he loved – operating a bull dozer – and 69 years later he’s still going strong, sometimes putting in 40-60 hours a week.

     “I feel better when I’m getting up and going to work,” said Elliott, who lives on Jericho Road. “If there’s work for me, I’ll do it.”

    Elliott’s love for the big tractors began when he worked on a relative’s farm at Fern Creek.

  •  As a part of our community’s preparation for LaRue County’s Relay for Life event on May 11-12 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life Committee is recognizing individual cancer survivors and the teams who are raising funds for the event.

  • When recycling comes to mind, people often think about a neat and clean environment filled with organized storage containers for collection. However, that’s not always the case.
    Often overlooked is the not-so-clean side of things such as sorting, organizing, banding and shipping the products after processing.
    In 2011, LaRue County’s recycling center, better known as Renaissance Recycling, collected more than 500 tons of recyclable material and distributed it to select facilities across the state.

  •  Through the work of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kentuckiana, children all over the state are being positively impacted by one-to-one unique mentoring relationships. However, some children haven’t yet had their chance.

  • What began for Sonya Hill as an endeavor to inspire her two children to enjoy reading turned into a novel set in Hodgenville. 

  •  Cody Warren helped his daughter, 3-year-old Kaylee Mae, glue a tail on an Easter bunny cutout during Thursday’s Wee Time preschool program at Abraham Lincoln Elementary School. About 30 children attended the final session of the school year but they were joined by several other students in the KHIC (Kindergarten Here I Come) program.

  •  To see Charles Butler and his infectious, sometimes mischievous, grin you would never know he is battling chronic lymphocytic leukemia. But Charles is a survivor and he knows he is among the fortunate ones. 

  • Persuaded by a part-time farm hand working on the family grain and dairy farm, Dale Dobson, now safety coordinator for the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, joined the LaRue County Volunteer Fire Department.
    “Brad Miller was his name,” said Dobson. “He would always say, ‘come on man, join ... you’d really like doing this at night,’ so in February 1989 I finally did.”

  •  Congratulations to all the participants in the 4-H Poetry Contest. Participants are to be commended for their efforts. Eighty-three poems were entered and judged.

    The poems were divided into two age groups for judging. Junior division participants are ages 9-13 and the senior age division includes 14-18 year olds.

    The top 8 junior poems and the top 4 senior poems will advance to the District competition.

    These poems will also be published in the District 4-H Poetry Book. All winners will receive a copy of the poetry book.

     

  • Several LaRue County firefighters attended the 49th annual Dixie Fire School in Elizabethtown this weekend.
    The fire school held at the Elizabethtown Community and Technical College campus, had 805 people pre-registered for 2012 classes – a far cry from the 60 who attended the few classes offered in 1963.

  • “The easy part about cancer is being a survivor. The hard part is watching others go through it and not make it.”
    Those are the words of Susan Holt, co-captain of LaRue County Relay for Life’s Janet’s Angels team.
    The team, which has formerly been known as the “Tiki Hut Healers,” formed in 1997 in support of then 13-year-old Valerie Holt. Valerie was battling Wilms tumor.

  • Years of hard work and volunteerism are paying off for a LaRue County woman as she graduates with a specialized degree from Western Kentucky University.
    Ashley McWaters has become the first person in an eight-county span, known as Area 5 State Fire and Rescue Training District, to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in systems management fire administration.