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Features

  •  Leslie Fender doesn’t get in a hurry.

    At 54, the lanky Texan is retired from careers as a butler and a restaurateur, and like many men, he’s finally getting a chance to travel.

    But he isn’t jetting from city to city or hurtling down the highway in an RV. He’s taking the back roads with his traveling partner, Angel.

    Together they’ve traveled 4,200 miles this year, and they have many miles to go before they reach warmer country for the winter.

  •  Tim Speakman believes picture quilts, like fine paintings, should tell a story.

  •  What people will see when the Hardin County Tribute to Veterans official opens on Veterans Day is an impressive series of statues and monoliths honoring the sacrifices and service of all United States veterans from each of the five military branches as well as men and women of the civil service.

    What they won’t see is the patriotic pride instilled in Terry Shelton, co-owner with his wife Diane of Quarry Hill Monuments that set the 16 granite pieces and six sculptures in place.

  •  Nell Chaudoin knew something was wrong with her lifestyle in May 2011 when she easily finished four large slices of Dutch caramel apple pie.

    “I was disgusted with myself,” she said, remembering how she felt afterwards.

    It was then the 26-year-old Cox’s Creek native knew she needed to make a permanent lifestyle change, not only for herself, but also for her students.

  •  Mary Rama, of Hodgenville, had a busy couple of days this past weekend as she celebrated her 90th birthday, 47th Lincoln Days and an impromptu family reunion.

  •   From I-65 South, take the Hodgenville exit at Elizabethtown. 

  •  Nancy Hubbard recites the poem “Once There Was a Watermelon” as if she had just memorized it yesterday. But the words come to her from many, many years ago – a remnant of her Hodgenville schooling in the 1920s. 

  •  If you are interested in the therapeutic program, riding lessons for your kids or anything else related to Wayne Ridge Farm, contact Jodi Johnson at (270) 320-5928.  

    Jodi Johnson rides horses in her sleep, kicking whoever is in bed with her as if she were nudging her horse. As someone who spends so much time with the animals, it comes as no surprise. 

  •  A new book by Nancy Barry goes deeply into the history of Kentucky, including LaRue County.  Lightning Bugs and Sunday School is a collection of stories and poems about growing up and living in the commonwealth. 

  •  The quilts cover the couch, the chairs – piled up in the closet and on a nearby recliner too.  Dozens of vibrantly colored and delicately made quilts help to personalize the home of Helen Clark. They are all creations of the soon-to-be 100-year old woman and they represent the long and rich life she has lived.

  •  Working at the 12th Evacuation Hospital in Cu Chi, Vietnam, in 1970, LaRue County native Charles Allen had seen the guts and gore of what war is really like, unlike the glory in which it is often portrayed.

  •  Steve Thompson could give lessons to whoever said, “If life gives you lemons, make lemonade.”

    Just when he was living the good life with success in music and real estate, he was besieged with a deluge of drawbacks, including two bouts of cancer and a disastrous economic downturn that would have caused most people to lose hope… but not Thompson.

    “The victory is in the fight,” the 53-year-old former Michigan resident said.

    Thompson was born in New York City but the family moved to a very rural Michigan farm in 1967.

  •  For 33 years senior citizens from far and near have found three and a half-hours of musical entertainment every Saturday night at LaRue County’s Senior Center located on Walters Avenue in Hodgenville.

    Part of the reason for that enjoyment, according to co-managers Charles and Viola Riggs, is that the performers as well as the audience feed off of each other’s enthusiasm.

  •  Murle Elliott has never been one to flit, like a bird, from job to job.

    When he was only 17 years old, he found a job he loved – operating a bull dozer – and 69 years later he’s still going strong, sometimes putting in 40-60 hours a week.

     “I feel better when I’m getting up and going to work,” said Elliott, who lives on Jericho Road. “If there’s work for me, I’ll do it.”

    Elliott’s love for the big tractors began when he worked on a relative’s farm at Fern Creek.

  •  As a part of our community’s preparation for LaRue County’s Relay for Life event on May 11-12 at Hodgenville Elementary School, the local Relay for Life Committee is recognizing individual cancer survivors and the teams who are raising funds for the event.

  • When recycling comes to mind, people often think about a neat and clean environment filled with organized storage containers for collection. However, that’s not always the case.
    Often overlooked is the not-so-clean side of things such as sorting, organizing, banding and shipping the products after processing.
    In 2011, LaRue County’s recycling center, better known as Renaissance Recycling, collected more than 500 tons of recyclable material and distributed it to select facilities across the state.

  •  Through the work of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Kentuckiana, children all over the state are being positively impacted by one-to-one unique mentoring relationships. However, some children haven’t yet had their chance.

  • What began for Sonya Hill as an endeavor to inspire her two children to enjoy reading turned into a novel set in Hodgenville. 

  •  Cody Warren helped his daughter, 3-year-old Kaylee Mae, glue a tail on an Easter bunny cutout during Thursday’s Wee Time preschool program at Abraham Lincoln Elementary School. About 30 children attended the final session of the school year but they were joined by several other students in the KHIC (Kindergarten Here I Come) program.