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Features

  •  Sunrise Manor, in Hodgenville, has added a new and fuzzy member to its team.

  •  Ruby and Clifford Perkins have spent quite some time together in their lives. On June 8 they will have been married for 70 years – no easy feat in this day and age. 

  •  Ashley Scoby of Glasgow won the David Dick Storytelling competition for University of Kentucky students for a story she wrote when she interned last summer at The LaRue County Herald News.

  •    In the early winter of 1808, Thomas and Nancy Lincoln and their infant daughter, Sarah, moved from Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Kentucky, to Sinking Spring Farm, located about three miles south of Robert Hodgen’s Mill, also in Hardin County, present-day LaRue County since 1843.
    Thomas actually purchased the farm, then believed to contain 300 acres, on Dec. 12, 1808, from Isaac Bush for $200 cash and the assumption of a small obligation owed to Richard Mather, an earlier titleholder.

  • When Sally Clopton’s husband died in 2001, she suffered all the stages of grieving that a tragic loss involves, including a feeling of isolation.
    “I stayed home, didn’t want to go anywhere, and my mind mainly dealt on the loss of my husband,” she said.
    But, sometime later, on the way back to her home near Mount Sherman after visiting some family members in Brownsville, she realized something that changed the rest of her life.

  •  Though most of the places they visited during their December Holy Land trip brought to life what they had only read and dreamed about for years, a few surprises awaited LaRue Countians Howard Ragland, his son David, and David’s wife Debbie.

  •  Mary Lowe- Jackson always knew she wanted to be a teacher.

  •  The LaRue County Public Library wants to show off its newly refurbished Teen Space. An open house is Friday, Feb. 22 from 2 to 4 p.m.

  •  February is “I Love My Library” and “Library Lovers’ Month.” The Herald News is featuring different staff and services each week this month.

  •       Like many people, Ben and Angela Roberts like to watch game shows on television and play along from the comfort of their home. One particular favorite has been “The Newlywed game.”

  •  Although Eddie Miles has aged since his first performance as Elvis at the Memories Theatre at Pigeon Forge, he’s looking forward to making new memories there.

    Eddie Miles, a Nelson County native who has appeared numerous times at the Lincoln Jamboree in Hodgenville, has made a living with his Elvis act for years and headlined at the Memories Theatre in Pigeon Forge in the ’90s as Elvis Presley. Now he said he’s returning to his old stage to headline again.

  • Justine Dennis, of New Haven, calls herself a fiber artist, and continues learning about her style of sewing she invented about 20 years ago, called Torsion Sewing.

    “As far as I know, nobody else does the same thing and it’s all done on the sewing machine,” she said.

    She added that many artist and gallery owners have told her that her style is unique and that they’ve never seen anything like it before.

  •  Day highlights efforts of unsung health care providers

  •  The world was a completely different place when Alma “Dora” Taylor was born on Jan. 3, 1910, in Beaver Dam.

  •  Brigadier General Robert W. “Bob” Cundiff, LaRue County’s highest ranking military veteran, began his career in the U.S. Army in 1944. His first tour was in Germany during World War II.

  •  University of Kentucky head basketball coach John Calipari often talks about how important teamwork is for success.

  •  Recently, I’ve gotten to know Anthony J. Coccia and his life story of struggle, survival and service.

  •  My career desire was always to be a country trial lawyer. Although I received my law degree in 1956, I had spent most of my time in banking and other salaried jobs as I had a wonderful wife and two beautiful children to support.

  •  When Amy Garrett began to plan her son’s fourth birthday, she looked beyond the usual cake, balloons, and ice cream.

  •  William “Junebug” Gowen, a self-described amateur archeologist for the last 40 years, has spent countless hours studying the scriptures … and rocks.