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Features

  • The 4-H Talent Show will be 6:30 p.m. Friday, March 27, at the LaRue County High School auditorium. Pre-registration was due by March 23. To pre-register, call the Extension Service office at 358-3401 or stop by to pick up a registration form. 

    The talent show is open to all LaRue County youth ages 9 to 18. A variety of categories are offered including vocal, instrumental, physical skills and theatrical. A group act category is also offered for acts with five or more participants. Other acts may have from one to four participants.

  • Several LaRue County 4-H members entered their project record books for judging in the District 5 competition. 

    County winners in the junior division categories were eligible to submit their record book to be judged at the district level against 4-H members from the other 17 counties in District 5. When the judging was complete, LaRue County members had earned champion honors in three categories – rabbit, foods and gardening.

    Results

    Foods – Michaela Rock, champion, blue ribbon

    Gardening – Leslie Pike, champion, blue ribbon

  • Last week’s ice storm was one for the ages, and one we will be seeing the effects of for years. This includes the damage to many landscape and woodland trees. I would like to share with you some information from Bill Fountain, Extension professor in arboriculture about the situation.

  • The seed analysis tag is your guarantee of what you are paying for. Good knowledge of what that tag tells you can be a useful tool in receiving the best value for your money. Be especially aware of the seed variety, pure seed, germination and test date on an analysis tag:

  • It won’t be long before tobacco growers will prepare greenhouses and outdoor float beds and start producing tobacco transplants. Higher production costs associated with increased prices of fuel and other inputs are among the problems faced by tobacco producers.

    Losses to disease in the float system could take an additional toll on a growers’ bottom line. Planning and preparation now can lead to better disease control and better yields of transplants in the spring.

  • Day of Prayer

    Dr. Ruth Redel will be  guest speaker at the World Day of Prayer Service noon March 6. The service is sponsored by the local Church Women United and will be hosted by Central Avenue Baptist Church, 401 Central Ave., Elizabethtown. World Day of Prayer is a Worldwide ecumenical movement of women of many faiths who come together to observe a common day of prayer. For more information, contact Linda Funk at 737-2929.

    Free dinner and movie

  • Class of ‘89 planning

    The LaRue County High School Class of 1989 will hold a reunion planning meeting 4:30 p.m. Feb. 28 at Ginza Japanese Restaurant in Elizabethtown. Call Karen Hawkins Barnes at 324-4262 or Laura Kasparie at 769-6392 if you plan to attend.

  • National FFA scholarship applications are available at http://www.ffa.org/index.cfm?method=c_programs.Scholarships. Applications must be submitted online and are due Feb. 17.

  • Renovating pastures and hay fields to renew grass productivity is one of the most important things LaRue County farmers can do to improve the grassland grazing and hay land in the county. Pastures in LaRue County feed the county’s 28,000 head of cattle and calves in addition to the other ruminant livestock and horses. Believe or not, pasture renovation time will soon be here.

  • The 4-H poetry contest is being held again this year. The contest is open to all LaRue County youth, ages 9 to 18. Each youth may enter one poem for the competition.

    All poems must be submitted to the LaRue County Extension Service by Feb. 20. Most students have probably already written poems for school. Why not turn your best poem in to be judged? Teachers, you may even wish to require your students to participate in the poetry contest, or give extra credit for those students who participate.

  • NAP application closing dates

    The deadlines to file an application for natural disaster protection under the Noninsured Assistance Program are March 2 and March 16.

  • LaRue County Extension is teaming up with Meade and Hardin counties to offer a six-week Farm Women Financial Workshop called Annie’s project. This workshop is geared towards farm women wanting to take a more active role in the business side of the farming operation. The program is offered in 14 states. This is the third year for the program in Kentucky, and the first time it has been offered locally.

  • Dairy producers can take a virtual video farm tour of two successful Kentucky dairy farms that are dramatically different in size and located at opposite ends of the state.

  • The prices of fertilizers have increased at an astounding rate the last two years. With the decrease in commodity prices, fertilizer costs now may be the dominant factor in determining a profit. Efficient and wise use of fertilizers and the nutrients in the soil become important in determining your profit.

  • Producer applications for the LaRue County Goat and Sheep Association’s Goat and Sheep Diversification Program will be accepted Jan. 5-30. Approved applicants must submit receipts for reimbursement of qualified expenses before Jan. 30. The program’s grant funds are a portion of the Phase 1 Tobacco Program. Applications and further information including guidelines and restrictions may be obtained by contacting program administrators Sherman and Renee Thomason at 358-0187, Gil Myers at 324-4366 or the LaRue County Extension Service office at 358-3401. 

  • A Scottsville couple have been named winner of Kentucky Farm Bureau’s annual Outstanding Young Farm Family contest.

    Bart and Sarah Jones received the first-place award last week at Farm Bureau’s annual meeting at the Galt House Hotel.

  • Twenty-eight farmers from the Hardin and LaRue County area met with Farm Market Analyst Jason Moss to review and discuss the new farm environment and how producers will need to compete in the 21st century.

    Moss – part of the nationally known Brock Report Team – delivered the message that the U.S. farm economy has undergone profound changes over the last few months with rising commodity prices, roller coaster economics and adjustments in hedging and margins, bringing a whole new set of risks to farming.

  • Twenty-eight farmers from the Hardin and LaRue County area met with Farm Market Analyst Jason Moss to review and discuss the new farm environment and how producers will need to compete in the 21st century.

    Moss – part of the nationally known Brock Report Team – delivered the message that the U.S. farm economy has undergone profound changes over the last few months with rising commodity prices, roller coaster economics and adjustments in hedging and margins, bringing a whole new set of risks to farming.

  • Twenty-eight farmers from the Hardin and LaRue County area met with Farm Market Analyst Jason Moss to review and discuss the new farm environment and how producers will need to compete in the 21st century.

    Moss – part of the nationally known Brock Report Team – delivered the message that the U.S. farm economy has undergone profound changes over the last few months with rising commodity prices, roller coaster economics and adjustments in hedging and margins, bringing a whole new set of risks to farming.

  • Dwayne Whitlock retired last week from a job he truly enjoyed. For 34 years, he worked as a district forest ranger for the Kentucky Division of Forestry.

    He plans to “just kick back and take it easy for awhile,” but it’s obvious he can’t get the forestry service out of his blood. After all, he lives on a tree farm (although it is no longer on the state’s tree farm registry) and was once willing to dress up as Smokey Bear in a parade to promote the care of woodlands.