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Features

  • If the statue of Abraham Lincoln, on the square in Hodgenville since 1909, could speak, what stories would the Great Emancipator have to tell about the many businesses, events, and people on the square that have come and gone through the years?

    Although the statue sits in stately silence, some of the people who’ve been a part of those changes, such as Joel Ray Sprowls, vividly recall many things.

  • Owner and culinary specialist Jamie Warren, along with her mother-in-law Mary Lynn Warren and Sarah Roberts Anthony, prepare fresh-baked cookies, cakes and rolls, as well as soups, hot and cold sandwiches and salads.

    Jamie Warren has lived in the Hodgenville area about 12 years with her husband, Bow. She said she is originally from Powell County where in her large family, large meals were the norm. A typical meal wasn’t much different from one served on Thanksgiving Day.

  • Hardin Memorial Hospital will hold free bariatric surgery informational seminars throughout the year.

    All sessions are in 5A, 6-8 p.m. Dates are April 7, May 27, June 9, July 15, Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 13 and Nov. 3. Call 270-982-1200 for more information or to register.

  • This will be a very interesting year for corn growers in the county. While everyone is talking about the price of corn, farmers are confronted with high costs of fuel, fertilizer, land rent, seed, labor and other input costs. Efficiency is still a key to profitable corn production. A simple corn production calendar follows.

  • Most farmers don’t think much about thistles until they see the plants begin to send up a stalk and then a seed head in late spring. However, now is a good time to inspect pastures for the rosette stage of the plant and take action if needed.

    Thistles are one of the most troublesome weed problems in pastures and hayfields. Thistle plants can interfere with grazing, limit forage availability, and become a major problem for hay production.

  • Grass tetany is a cattle disorder caused by an abnormally low amount of magnesium in the bloodstream of cattle. It can occur in most cattle herds. Pregnant cows should be fed supplemental magnesium from 60 days before calving until the beginning of the breeding season to help prevent grass tetany and maintain proper health for maintenance and rebreeding.

  • When Gordon and Jonel Priddy’s daughter Sara left the Arabian Western Pleasure competition to attend college, her parents were left with an important decision.

    “We could either continue as grooms, as we were for Sara, and hire someone else to ride,” said her father, “or we could groom and ride.” They decided on the latter choice.

  • Since graduating from LaRue County High School in 2003, Charlee Doom has experienced more adventures than Indiana Jones.

    She has swum with dolphins and whale sharks in Tanzania, survived a bout with malaria while living there in mud huts and tree houses and has been bitten by a kangaroo in Australia. 

    The quest continues as she embarks on her next venture – to serve as a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar at the University of Western Australia in Perth.

  • The 4-H Talent Show will be 6:30 p.m. Friday, March 27, at the LaRue County High School auditorium. Pre-registration was due by March 23. To pre-register, call the Extension Service office at 358-3401 or stop by to pick up a registration form. 

    The talent show is open to all LaRue County youth ages 9 to 18. A variety of categories are offered including vocal, instrumental, physical skills and theatrical. A group act category is also offered for acts with five or more participants. Other acts may have from one to four participants.

  • Several LaRue County 4-H members entered their project record books for judging in the District 5 competition. 

    County winners in the junior division categories were eligible to submit their record book to be judged at the district level against 4-H members from the other 17 counties in District 5. When the judging was complete, LaRue County members had earned champion honors in three categories – rabbit, foods and gardening.

    Results

    Foods – Michaela Rock, champion, blue ribbon

    Gardening – Leslie Pike, champion, blue ribbon

  • Last week’s ice storm was one for the ages, and one we will be seeing the effects of for years. This includes the damage to many landscape and woodland trees. I would like to share with you some information from Bill Fountain, Extension professor in arboriculture about the situation.

  • The seed analysis tag is your guarantee of what you are paying for. Good knowledge of what that tag tells you can be a useful tool in receiving the best value for your money. Be especially aware of the seed variety, pure seed, germination and test date on an analysis tag:

  • It won’t be long before tobacco growers will prepare greenhouses and outdoor float beds and start producing tobacco transplants. Higher production costs associated with increased prices of fuel and other inputs are among the problems faced by tobacco producers.

    Losses to disease in the float system could take an additional toll on a growers’ bottom line. Planning and preparation now can lead to better disease control and better yields of transplants in the spring.

  • Day of Prayer

    Dr. Ruth Redel will be  guest speaker at the World Day of Prayer Service noon March 6. The service is sponsored by the local Church Women United and will be hosted by Central Avenue Baptist Church, 401 Central Ave., Elizabethtown. World Day of Prayer is a Worldwide ecumenical movement of women of many faiths who come together to observe a common day of prayer. For more information, contact Linda Funk at 737-2929.

    Free dinner and movie

  • Class of ‘89 planning

    The LaRue County High School Class of 1989 will hold a reunion planning meeting 4:30 p.m. Feb. 28 at Ginza Japanese Restaurant in Elizabethtown. Call Karen Hawkins Barnes at 324-4262 or Laura Kasparie at 769-6392 if you plan to attend.

  • National FFA scholarship applications are available at http://www.ffa.org/index.cfm?method=c_programs.Scholarships. Applications must be submitted online and are due Feb. 17.

  • Renovating pastures and hay fields to renew grass productivity is one of the most important things LaRue County farmers can do to improve the grassland grazing and hay land in the county. Pastures in LaRue County feed the county’s 28,000 head of cattle and calves in addition to the other ruminant livestock and horses. Believe or not, pasture renovation time will soon be here.

  • The 4-H poetry contest is being held again this year. The contest is open to all LaRue County youth, ages 9 to 18. Each youth may enter one poem for the competition.

    All poems must be submitted to the LaRue County Extension Service by Feb. 20. Most students have probably already written poems for school. Why not turn your best poem in to be judged? Teachers, you may even wish to require your students to participate in the poetry contest, or give extra credit for those students who participate.

  • NAP application closing dates

    The deadlines to file an application for natural disaster protection under the Noninsured Assistance Program are March 2 and March 16.