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Features

  • Free car wash

    The youth of Buffalo Baptist Church will have a free car wash 9 a.m.-noon May 16. Donations will be accepted. All proceeds will go toward the summer mission trip. Call 325-3820 for more information.

  • LaRue County 4-H members excelled April 18 in Washington County at the Area 4-H Variety Show. As a group, the participants won three grand champion honors and one reserve champion award.

    The members first competed at the LaRue County 4-H Talent Show. The winning acts at the county level then advanced to compete at the Area 4-H Variety Show. The acts are divided into two age groups: juniors ages 9-14 and seniors ages 14-18. The acts are divided by category. The categories include vocal, instrumental, physical skills and theatrical.     

  • In her 36 years as administrator of Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Hodgenville, Daphne Loyall has experienced her share of emergencies.

    The late January ice storm that knocked out electric power to her home on Salem Church Road for 10 days, however, put her in the role of saving an unusual potential victim – the family’s 11-foot-long, 25-pound red-tail boa constrictor.

    The boa was a gift to her son Zach about 12 years ago. At that time, it was only about one foot long.

  • Seventeen-year-old Stephen McKellep hopes to join the ranks of Bill Gates, Neil Armstrong, H. Ross Perot and Gerald R. Ford by summer. He’s working on his Eagle Scout Badge through the Boy Scouts of America. It’s the highest honor awarded in scouting.

    McKellep, the son of David and Marsha McKellep of Upton, has planned a two-day electronics recycling or “eCycling” event with the assistance of Hodgenville’s Renaissance Recycling Center.

  • There are several burley tobacco seedling diseases caused by fungi and fungus-like organisms. Let’s look at them.

  • Eight seconds can seem like a lifetime to a rider hanging on with only a rope and a prayer as an 1,100-pound, very agitated bucking horse tries everything in its bag of tricks to heave the unwelcome load off its back.

    “It’s a challenge, definitely, but that’s why I love it, and that’s why it’s fun,” said Cody Stephens, a senior at LaRue County High School who is the defending state high school rodeo champ in bareback bronc riding.

  • Weather conditions seem to be changing to a warmer pattern. These conditions can lead to a number of environmental disorders such as damping off in tobacco float beds.

    The float-system environment is near-ideal for Rhizoctonia solani, the fungus causing damping-off (or soreshin) in tobacco seedlings. Damping-off usually occurs early in the development of the seedling and first appears as a water-soaked lesion at the base of the plant.

  • The LaRue County Farmer’s Market will open May 7 in the LaRue County Extension Service parking lot. It will be open 2-5 p.m. on Thursdays.

    If you are interested in becoming a member of the market, there is a $15 fee for the year due by May 7. Non-members will be charged a $10 set-up fee for each market day you set up. Contact Abby Tate, Food and Nutrition assistant at the Extension Office for more information at 358-3401. The farmer’s market is primarily for the benefit of local producers and to give local consumers access to the freshest products.

  • LaRue County Farm Bureau is offering $3,000 in college scholarships. These include four $500 college scholarships open to both high school seniors who will enter college this fall, to undergraduate college students, and to adults interested in entering college or continuing their college education.

    LaRue County Farm Bureau also will offer a $1,000 scholarship in memory of Ben H. Crawford Jr. Applicants for this scholarship must be a college sophomore or higher, including graduate students, pursuing a degree in agriculture or an agriculture-related field.

  • Carwash

    Boy Scout Troop 151 will have a car wash at 9 a.m. May 9 in the parking lot of LaRue County Farm Bureau. Donations are appreciated.

    Cornhole for Relay

    Relay for Life will host a cornhole tournament 10 a.m. May 9 in the Abraham Lincoln Elementary School gym; $10 per person. For more information, call 766-7834.

    Project Graduation bake sale

    Project Graduation will hold a bake sale 9 a.m. May 9 in the IGA lobby. For more information, call 358-4375.

  • USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program signup. Landowners may apply for WHIP at any time however; applications received by April 15 will be evaluated and considered for the 2009 program year. Applications received after that date will be held until the next evaluation period.

  • Excessive winter annual weed growth can affect insect management in corn. One insect group problem that may be encountered is the cutworms. Cutworms do not prefer to lay eggs on corn, they more commonly lay their eggs on winter annual weeds. Black cutworm cannot overwinter here; in early spring the moths migrate to Kentucky with weather fronts out of the south. As the moths tend to lay their eggs and feed on winter annuals, cutworm damage usually occurs when winter annuals have been burnt down with herbicides forcing the intermediate-stage larvae to feed on the emerging corn.

  • Farm tractors and farm equipment can be dangerous. Each year there are accidents with farm equipment that causes injuries and death.

  • The Central Kentucky Art Guild All Member Juried Art Show will be 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays through May 18 in the Morrison Gallery at Elizabethtown Community and Technical College. The Morrison Gallery is in the ECTC main administration building and public parking is available.

    The guild art show represents about 40 artists. Many of the artists are award winning.

    Fine art such as landscapes, portraits, florals, still life, woodcarvings, and sculptures are examples of art that will be shown. Your selection may be purchased from the artist upon request.

  • Jacobs Energy, a natural resource development company specializing in oil and gas exploration and servicing, is opening Sand Castle Quarry on Attilla Road off Campbellsville Road. The quarry is at the location of the former Tri-County Sand & Aggregate LLC.

    Sand Castle Quarry is a supplier of sand and pea gravel to both commercial clients and individuals at the retail site. Delivery service is available. The products can be used for construction and recreational projects.

  • Congratulations to all the participants in the 4-H Poetry Contest. Participants are to be commended for their efforts. Fifty-four poems were entered and the poems have been judged.

    The poems were divided into two age groups for judging. Junior division participants are ages 9-13 and the senior age division includes 14-18 year olds.

    The top 10 junior poems and the top two senior poems will advance to district competition.

    These poems also will be published in the District 4-H Poetry Book. All winners will receive a copy of the poetry book.

  • It is now time for youth ages 9-14 to register to attend 4-H Camp this summer. The camp is June 29-July 2 at Lake Cumberland.

    We also need adults and teens to attend camp, so consider attending camp with your child or grandchild. Adults attend for free because they serve as chaperones. Selected 4-H Teen Leaders pay $75 instead of the full camp fee.

  • Grain production calendars have been developed to help producers prioritize and schedule work events on the farm. However, weather events and equipment breakdowns rarely follow an organized schedule. This calendar should be treated as a starting point and as a tool to help prioritize some of the practices involved in grain production.

  • Grain production calendars have been developed to help producers prioritize and schedule work events on the farm. However, weather events and equipment breakdowns rarely follow an organized schedule. This calendar should be treated as a starting point and as a tool to help prioritize some of the practices involved in grain production.

  • Grain production calendars have been developed to help producers prioritize and schedule work events on the farm. However, weather events and equipment breakdowns rarely follow an organized schedule. This calendar should be treated as a starting point and as a tool to help prioritize some of the practices involved in grain production.