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Features

  • Natural Resources Conservation Service in Kentucky is accepting applications for the Grassland Reserve Program. Although GRP applications are continually accepted, the application ranking cutoff date is June 1.

    The Grassland Reserve Program is a voluntary program offering landowners and operators the opportunity to protect grazing uses and related conservation values by conserving and restoring grassland resources. 

  • It looks like tobacco growers will have to hold field-ready transplants for a few days or more this year. Often this coincides with periods of humid cloudy weather. Densely packed plants in a humid environment is a recipe for big problems. Below are some suggestions for holding plants until field conditions improve.

    Maintain a low level of fertility: Reducing fertility levels to the 25 to 50 parts per million nitrogen range will slow growth and reduce the amount of rank green leaf material that may be more susceptible to bacterial rots.  

  • 4-H camp registration

    4-H camp registration is under way for LaRue County youth ages 9-13. Camp will be June 29-July 2 at Lake Cumberland. Registration forms are available at the Extension Service office. Cost is $140 per camper. A $75 deposit is due with registration form to hold the child’s spot. Full payment is due by May 22.

    Shooting sports

    The 4-H Shooting Sports Club will practice at 6:30 p.m. May 21 at the New Haven Gun Club. For more information, call 358-3401.

     

    Dog club

  • The Kentucky Agri­cul­tural Development Board approved the County Agricultural Investment Program in March.

    The program provides farmers with incentives to improve and diversify current production practices.

    CAIP combines what were known previously as County Model Cost-share Programs into one, in which each model program becomes an investment area.

    This change, along with a 12-month term for all investment areas, will provide better uniformity and continuity, which will enhance accountability.

  • Meat Goat Field Day

  • It’s been a long journey, but the LaRue County Genealogy Society finally has found a home.

    The group opened its research center and library Tuesday inside the former Hodgenville city police station at 109 N. Greensburg St. The building also houses the city maintenance department.

    The building became available in January after the police department moved next door to Hodgenville City Hall on West High Street. Mayor Terry Cruse said the city will pay the electricity and water bill for the combined offices.

  • Paul Dangerfield of Hodgenville is a new junior member of the American Angus Association headquartered in Missouri.

    Junior members are eligible to register cattle, participate in programs conducted by the National Junior Angus Association and take part in association-sponsored shows and other national and regional events.

    The American Angus Association is the largest beef registry association in the world with nearly 33,000 active adult and junior members.

  • Free car wash

    The youth of Buffalo Baptist Church will have a free car wash 9 a.m.-noon May 16. Donations will be accepted. All proceeds will go toward the summer mission trip. Call 325-3820 for more information.

  • LaRue County 4-H members excelled April 18 in Washington County at the Area 4-H Variety Show. As a group, the participants won three grand champion honors and one reserve champion award.

    The members first competed at the LaRue County 4-H Talent Show. The winning acts at the county level then advanced to compete at the Area 4-H Variety Show. The acts are divided into two age groups: juniors ages 9-14 and seniors ages 14-18. The acts are divided by category. The categories include vocal, instrumental, physical skills and theatrical.     

  • In her 36 years as administrator of Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Hodgenville, Daphne Loyall has experienced her share of emergencies.

    The late January ice storm that knocked out electric power to her home on Salem Church Road for 10 days, however, put her in the role of saving an unusual potential victim – the family’s 11-foot-long, 25-pound red-tail boa constrictor.

    The boa was a gift to her son Zach about 12 years ago. At that time, it was only about one foot long.

  • Seventeen-year-old Stephen McKellep hopes to join the ranks of Bill Gates, Neil Armstrong, H. Ross Perot and Gerald R. Ford by summer. He’s working on his Eagle Scout Badge through the Boy Scouts of America. It’s the highest honor awarded in scouting.

    McKellep, the son of David and Marsha McKellep of Upton, has planned a two-day electronics recycling or “eCycling” event with the assistance of Hodgenville’s Renaissance Recycling Center.

  • There are several burley tobacco seedling diseases caused by fungi and fungus-like organisms. Let’s look at them.

  • Eight seconds can seem like a lifetime to a rider hanging on with only a rope and a prayer as an 1,100-pound, very agitated bucking horse tries everything in its bag of tricks to heave the unwelcome load off its back.

    “It’s a challenge, definitely, but that’s why I love it, and that’s why it’s fun,” said Cody Stephens, a senior at LaRue County High School who is the defending state high school rodeo champ in bareback bronc riding.

  • Weather conditions seem to be changing to a warmer pattern. These conditions can lead to a number of environmental disorders such as damping off in tobacco float beds.

    The float-system environment is near-ideal for Rhizoctonia solani, the fungus causing damping-off (or soreshin) in tobacco seedlings. Damping-off usually occurs early in the development of the seedling and first appears as a water-soaked lesion at the base of the plant.

  • The LaRue County Farmer’s Market will open May 7 in the LaRue County Extension Service parking lot. It will be open 2-5 p.m. on Thursdays.

    If you are interested in becoming a member of the market, there is a $15 fee for the year due by May 7. Non-members will be charged a $10 set-up fee for each market day you set up. Contact Abby Tate, Food and Nutrition assistant at the Extension Office for more information at 358-3401. The farmer’s market is primarily for the benefit of local producers and to give local consumers access to the freshest products.

  • LaRue County Farm Bureau is offering $3,000 in college scholarships. These include four $500 college scholarships open to both high school seniors who will enter college this fall, to undergraduate college students, and to adults interested in entering college or continuing their college education.

    LaRue County Farm Bureau also will offer a $1,000 scholarship in memory of Ben H. Crawford Jr. Applicants for this scholarship must be a college sophomore or higher, including graduate students, pursuing a degree in agriculture or an agriculture-related field.

  • Carwash

    Boy Scout Troop 151 will have a car wash at 9 a.m. May 9 in the parking lot of LaRue County Farm Bureau. Donations are appreciated.

    Cornhole for Relay

    Relay for Life will host a cornhole tournament 10 a.m. May 9 in the Abraham Lincoln Elementary School gym; $10 per person. For more information, call 766-7834.

    Project Graduation bake sale

    Project Graduation will hold a bake sale 9 a.m. May 9 in the IGA lobby. For more information, call 358-4375.

  • USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program signup. Landowners may apply for WHIP at any time however; applications received by April 15 will be evaluated and considered for the 2009 program year. Applications received after that date will be held until the next evaluation period.

  • Excessive winter annual weed growth can affect insect management in corn. One insect group problem that may be encountered is the cutworms. Cutworms do not prefer to lay eggs on corn, they more commonly lay their eggs on winter annual weeds. Black cutworm cannot overwinter here; in early spring the moths migrate to Kentucky with weather fronts out of the south. As the moths tend to lay their eggs and feed on winter annuals, cutworm damage usually occurs when winter annuals have been burnt down with herbicides forcing the intermediate-stage larvae to feed on the emerging corn.

  • Farm tractors and farm equipment can be dangerous. Each year there are accidents with farm equipment that causes injuries and death.