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Features

  • Leslie Pike of Hodgenville read her award-winning essay Saturday, June 6, to more than 350 beekeepers at a regional Beekeepers Association meeting in Grayson County.

    The essay “The Dance Language of the Honeybee” explains the history and significance of a bee’s dance. Also included in the essay were several types of dances.

    Pike won first place in the state for her essay and second place in the nation. The sixth-grader’s winnings totaled $600.

  • Diabetes Coalition to meet

    The Hardin and LaRue Diabetes Coalition is open to anyone with interest in improving the lives of people that are affected by diabetes through promotion of early diagnosis, reduction of complications, prevention, and elimination of diabetes. The group will meet 6-7:30 p.m. July 7 at the Lincoln Trail District Health Department. For more information, call Melissa Conder at 769-1604, Ext. 1035.

    Mother of the Year

  • LaRue County was represented at the State 4-H Teen Conference in June with five delegates attending. Jessica Wells was a returning delegate. Kaity Skaggs, Maria Durham, Kelsey Sallee and Kaylin Perkins attended for their first time.

  • Poison hemlock has been increasing locally during the past several years.  Although this plant often was seen along roadways and fencerows, it has expanded into grazed pasturelands and hay fields.

    The concern not only comes from its invasive nature, but the fact that it is one of the most toxic plants in the world. Throughout history, the toxicity of poison hemlock is well known for accidental deaths of humans and animals. It was the toxin used to poison the philosopher Socrates.

  • The Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft, 715 W. Main St., Louisville, will present “The Wind in Your Hair: Vintage Motorcycles” July 18 to Sept. 19. The exhibit will feature vintage motorcycles manufactured between 1900 to 1970, memorabilia and accessories, and three motorcycle-related photography collections by Michael Lichter, Danny Lyon and Sarah Lyon.

    The museum also will host a series of restoration and customizing workshops, and lectures about collecting motorcycles and the cultural influences of motorcycles in the 20th and 21st centuries.

  • Hiring a new farm employee can often be a difficult decision. Once that decision has been made and a new employee has reported for work, there are several pieces of paperwork which need to be completed. This applies to all employees whether hired on a temporary or permanent basis, and whether part-time or full-time. The completion of these forms is required by law and is meant to protect both the employee and the employer and farmers should be aware of them.

  • Several summer programs will take place at the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace on U.S. 31E south of Hodgenville. Programs are free and everyone is invited.

    Independence Day, July 4: Costumed interpreters from Frazier International History Museum will present two programs titled “Young Abe” at 11 a.m. and “Day in a Soldier’s Life: the American Civil War” at 2 p.m. In addition, there will be Civil War living history military encampment between 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.

  • The Lincoln Area Longbeards Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Foundation annual Jakes Day will be 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. June 27 at Tom Mattingly’s farm at 446 Ramsey Road, Sonora.

    This event is for children of all ages. There will be archery, fishing, target practice, safety program and 4-wheel demonstration.  Dr. Paul Gerard will speak about his reptiles. Life Net helicopter may make an appearance.

    Lunch is provided for all who attend. A parent or guardian must accompany their children to this event.

  • The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for Environmental Quality Incentives Program Grassland Bird Initiatives at the local USDA Service Center or conservation district office. The program helps pay for improvements that benefit wildlife.

  • May 28 marks the 32nd anniversary of the Beverly Hills Supper Club fire, the third deadliest blaze in U.S. history that claimed the life of former LaRue County High School football coach and teacher, Herman Clark “Clarkie” Mayfield, with 164 other victims.

    A room in the soon-to-be-completed Fort Thomas military and community museum, adjacent to Southgate where the blaze occurred, will be dedicated as a memorial to those victims.

  • The LaRue County Farmers Market is open each Thursday during the growing season with an assortment of bedding plants and hanging baskets. Joanna Hinton had asparagus, herbs and potted plants for sale as well. The sales will be held each Thursday afternoon in the LaRue County Extension Service's parking lot from 2 to 5 p.m.

  • Did you ever wonder why we have more thunderstorms during the spring and summer? It’s because weather patterns are more active as they move through during these seasons, especially in the afternoon and evening. The weather conditions also increase the potential for lightning to strike people at work or play outdoors and possibly while they’re inside a building. Hot, humid days with cold fronts approaching provide especially dangerous conditions for storms.

  • More than 30 high school students from four states will participate in the Western Kentucky University Department of Agriculture’s Agriculture Students Striving for Effective Tomorrows Conference in June.

  • LaRue County 4-H was well represented at the Area 4-H Variety Show in Washington County.

    Five LaRue County 4-H members participated, each bringing home either Champion or Reserve Champion honors. 

  • The wheat disease Fusarium head blight or head scab is at significant levels in many wheat fields across LaRue County and the state.

    FHB attacks wheat near and in the flowering stage. It can be particularly severe during wet weather. The continued wet, cloudy conditions the last few weeks provided excellent conditions for infection and likely favored multiple infection periods, which has resulted in a lot of disease development.

  • The second free Movie Night, sponsored by the City of Hodgenville and The LaRue County Herald News, is Saturday.

    The event coincides with the Goodtime Cruisers classic car cruise-in which will spotlight muscle cars.

    The movie begins at 7 p.m.

    Last month’s movie “Stuart Little” was geared toward children. This weekend’s movie is the classic suspense film “North by Northwest.”

  • Andy, the K-9 officer of the LaRue County Sheriff’s Department, is now a nationally certified drug dog.

    Andy and his handler, Deputy Russell McCoy, attended a day-long session in Murfreesboro last week. The 3-year-old Belgian Malinois did a “great” job at locating the different kinds of drugs hidden at the training center, McCoy said.

    Although Andy has worked numerous drug cases in LaRue and surrounding counties, his designation as a “National Narcotics Detective Dog” gives his nose for drugs more credence in matters of search and seizure.

  • Residents have the chance to make a one-of-a-kind Lincoln Bicentennial souvenir when a nationally known basket weaver holds classes in Hodgenville next month.

    Martha Wetherbee, an expert in the design, creation and history of Shaker baskets, will provide materials and instruction in creation of the "Lincoln Bicentennial Penny Basket," honoring the 200th anniversary of the birth of native son Abraham Lincoln.

    The penny basket will be 4 1/2-inches in diameter and can be made in one day.

  • One of LaRue County’s oldest cemeteries sits atop a small hill in Leafdale, shaded by ancient oaks and overgrown with poison ivy and saw briars.

    Little Mount Cemetery hasn’t had a burial since 70-year-old Kate Friend died in 1916. But most of the 90-or-so tombstones are inscribed with dates from the mid-1800s. Among the dead are Civil War soldiers, a playmate of Sarah Lincoln, a traveling salesman and the first sheriff of LaRue County.

  • Rabbit Club

    The 4-H Rabbit Club will meet 3:30-5 p.m. June 8 at the LaRue County Extension Service office.

    4-H camp registration

    4-H camp registration is under way for LaRue County youth ages 9-13. Camp will be June 29-July 2 at Lake Cumberland. Registration forms are available at the Extension Service office. Cost is $140 per camper. A $75 deposit is due with registration form to hold the child’s spot. Full payment is due by May 22.