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Features

  • The LaRue County Band Boosters are offering Market Day Food as a fundraiser for the band and other school organizations. Market Day can be ordered monthly and is delivered to the LCHS band room for pick up.

    Ordering can be done online at www.marketday.com with the organization being LCHS Band Boosters and the organization number 25294.

    All orders for October must be placed by 11 p.m. Oct. 8 and orders can be picked up at the high school band room 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Oct. 13.

  • Charity tea and auction

    Hosparus-Hospice of Central Kentucky will host its annual Hosparus Charity Tea and Auction 2-3:30 p.m. Nov. 1 at Campbellsville University. All proceeds benefit local hospice patients and their families. For tickets ($15 for adults and $5 for children), contact Lisa Sanford at 800-686-9577 or lsanford@hospices.org.

  • Beef Producers meet

    The LaRue County Beef Cattle Association will meet 7:30 p.m. Oct. 13 at the LaRue County Extension Service office, 807 Old Elizabethtown Road, Hodgenville. The guest speaker will be Kenny Burdine, University of Kentucky Agriculture Extension economist. He will discuss beef marketing and beef price outlook. All interested producers are invited to attend. For more information, contact the LaRue County Extension Service at 358-3401.

    Clovers All Over

  • Victory Baptist revival

    Victory Baptist Church's  revival continues at 7 p.m. Oct. 5-7. Guest pastor is Chuck Waters.

    Ordination service

    Lincoln Memorial Baptist Church will hold ordination services at 3 p.m. Oct. 11. Candidates for deacon are Durred Garner, Ronald Dockery and Phillip Stillwell.

    Union Separate revival

    Union Separate Baptist Church will hold a fall revival beginning at 7 p.m. Oct. 11 with Bro. Troy Arnett. For more information, call 324-3407.

    Benedictine open house

  • SATURDAY, OCT. 3

    7-9:30 a.m. – Hodgenville Woman's Club Breakfast

    8 a.m. – Flag raising on Lincoln Statue

    8:30 a.m. – Opening ceremonies

  • Doug and Sandy Poteet of Hodgenville have been turning a lot of eyes this summer as they drive through the streets of town and nearby countryside.

    Actually, they’re not causing the double takes so much as the vehicle they’re riding – an olive drab Russian military motorcycle complete with side car and red stars.

    “It’s a DNEPR (pronounced D-KNEE-PRO) Model MT 16, produced in Kiev, Ukraine, the same model used in the Indiana Jones movie with Sean Connery as his father,” said Poteet, who lives on Eugenia Avenue in Hutcherson Heights.

  • Winter squash, which includes acorn squash, butternut squash, pumpkin and other varieties, is low in fat and sodium. It is an excellent source of vitamin A and fiber. Store winter squash and pumpkins in a cool, dry place and use within one month.

  • Signups for the Conservation Stewardship Program will be accepted through Wednesday, Sept. 30. CSP is a voluntary program that encourages agricultural and forestry producers to maintain existing conservation activities and adopt additional ones on their operations.

    Unlike the Conservation Security Program under the 2002 Farm Bill, which was available only in designated watersheds, CSP is available statewide.

  • The 4-H program in Kentucky turns 100 this year.

    Since its inception in 1909, it has provided countless programs for youth. The earliest offerings were in agriculture, but more activities were added over the years including photography, communication, leadership, shooting skills and dog clubs.

    By 1939, 4-H programs existed in every county in Kentucky. Last year, 233,423 children participated in 129 different 4-H programs, projects and camps.

  • Class of 1964

    The LCHS Class of 1964 will celebrate its 45-year reunion with a meal and program 6 p.m. Oct. 2 at LaRue County Middle School cafeteria. For more information, contact Janis Warren Rogers, Beverly Russell Heady, Betty Crawford, Hazle Ragland Hinton, Mickey Miller, Ronnie Benningfield or call 358-9614.

    LCHS Class of 1999

  • The 4-H year runs Sept. 1 through Aug. 31. It’s now time for 4-H members to submit their 4-H Awards Point System Record Sheets.

    Record Sheets are simply a record of the 4-H activities or events a particular member has participated in during the past year. Points are assigned for various events, depending on the level of participation. Members then submit a record of the points they have earned, in order to be eligible for 4-H Points Awards to be presented Dec. 7 at the annual 4-H Awards Banquet.

  • LaRue County’s grain producers soon will begin an expected bountiful harvest of corn. With these higher yields, it is critical to fine-tune equipment to reduce field loss, reduce mechanical delays, improve performance, assure a safe harvest and maintain grain quality of your crops. In fact, a few hours spent with combines, augers, conveyors, dryers and storage bins usually will have a considerable pay back. 

  • According to the 2007 USDA Agricultural census, LaRue County ranks sixth in goat production and about 25th in sheep production in the state. While sheep numbers have declined for several years, goat production has done just the opposite – numbers have increased significantly.

    Much of the increase in goat numbers has been the introduction of meat type goats such as Boer goats from Africa and other foreign countries. This has generated an increased supply of higher quality goat meat for consumers.

  • Mrs. Smith’s and Mrs. Cline’s fourth-grade classes met for their 4-H meeting Sept. 16 at Abraham Lincoln Elementary School. 

    The meeting was held by Misty Wilmoth, 4-H Agent. 4-H membership forms were sent home by Mrs. Wilmoth for parents to fill out and return. Jada Montgomery led the 4-H pledge. Mrs. Wilmoth talked to everyone about what 4-H was.

  • The LaRue County FFA Chapter was selected as a 3-Star winner in the National FFA Chapter Award program. The local organization was selected from a pool of more than 600 candidates nationwide.

    “It is very exciting to know that our chapter is recognized as one of the elite chapters, not only in Kentucky, but in the nation,” said FFA advisor and LaRue County High School agriculture teacher Misty Bivens. “Mr. (Tim) Quiggins and I know that our members are outstanding, but it’s good to know it is recognized by others also.”

  • Good Shepherds Mission Store

    The Good Shepherd Mission Store in Magnolia is accepting donations, of food, clothing, household items, money or anything they can sell. All proceeds go to the Shepherd’s Pie Food Pantry at Magnolia Cumberland Presbyterian Church for the needy. For more information, call 324-4968.

    LaRue County Senior Citizens Center

  • Poster entry deadline

  • Mt. Zion has revival

    Mount Zion Separate Baptist Church will hold revival 7 p.m. Sept. 24-27 with Bro. Jason Davison, evangelist.

    Pleasant Ridge revival

    Revival starts Sunday at 7 p.m. at Pleasant Ridge Separate Baptist Church. The Rev. Danny Bailey is the evangelist.

    Community Church Service

    The Lincoln Days Community Church Service will be 9 a.m. Oct. 4 on Lincoln Square. Former U.S. Rep. Ron Lewis will speak.

    Victory Baptist revival

  • After the Lincoln Jamboree’s 55th anniversary show Saturday, Joel Ray Sprowls parked himself in a tall cloth chair backstage and put his feet on a worn leather footstool.

    He then engaged in a bit of historic math: 55 years times 52 weeks equals 2,860 Saturday night performances of his music review that began in1954 in a rented theater on Lincoln Square. That total doesn’t include an occasional 53rd Saturday resulting from a well-timed leap year, the travel shows and county fairs or the 26 weekly television done on long ago Thursday nights in Bowling Green.

  • A large crowd attended New Haven’s 19th annual Rolling Fork Iron Horse Festival last weekend.

    Numerous LaRue Countians participated in contests, booths and the parade. New Haven is in Nelson County, but located between the LaRue communities of Athertonville and Lyons Station.

    The festival’s theme was “All Roads Lead Home.”

    The event began Friday night with bouncers, concessions, demonstrations, games and face painting at New Haven City Park.

    On Saturday, the streets were crowded with visitors taking in the sights and sounds.