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Features

  • As a LaRue County 911 dispatcher – or telecommunicator for the politically correct – Daniel Highbaugh never knows what crisis awaits him when he answers the phone.

    “I’ve taken calls from people who have shot themselves, others were getting shot at, some have threatened suicide, or been in fights, or wrecks; for many of them, it’s a life and death situation,” the 2004 LaRue County High School graduate said.

  • The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture’s Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory has diagnosed a number of cases of Diplodia Ear Rot this fall. While Diplodia is the most common ear rot of corn this is more than normal, but it isn’t surprising, given the weather conditions experienced this growing season.

  • The LaRue County Herald News is asking all veterans to submit their name, address and phone number to the Herald News, if you are interested in being featured in the new Veteran Spotlight which will feature a different veteran each week as space allows.

    Send information to The LaRue County Herald News, 40 Shawnee Drive, Hodgenville, KY 42748

  • In the fall, people often ask how to cook with fresh pumpkin.

    You must remember that not all kinds of pumpkins are best for cooking. The jack-o-lantern pumpkins you see everywhere this time of year tend to be too large and stringy for baking. So when you are growing or buying pumpkins, ask if it is a variety that is good to use in cooking.

  • Kids love Halloween but trick or treating isn’t what it used to be. It’s not as safe to let kids walk the streets alone. Send a responsible adult or older teenager with them.

    SAFETY TIPS

  • Donald Nunn of Hodgenville is a new member of the American Angus Association.

    The American Angus Association, with nearly 33,000 active adult and junior members, is the largest beef cattle registry Association in the world. Its computerized records include detailed information on nearly 16 million registered Angus.

    The national breed registry organization is located in St. Joseph, Mo.

  • When the congregation of Hodgenville's First Baptist Church presented its pastor, the Rev. B.F. Hagan, with a Christmas gift in 1897, he likely had no inkling that the present would become a conversation piece 112 years later. The gift — a 68-by-78-inch hand-stitched quilt — will be presented to the church on Tonieville Road during the worship service there Sunday, Oct. 25.

    One of the more interesting things about the full-size coverlet is that it contains some 660 names hand stitched into a Boston Puzzle style pattern.

  • Fall sewing classes

    Master Clothing Volunteer Rosa Smith will be offering beginning classes for adults on sewing and pattern fitting on Tuesday afternoons Oct. 27-Dec. 15. Classes will be at the LaRue County Extension Service at 807 Old Elizabethtown Road, Hodgenville. Call 358-3401 for more information and to register. Class sizes are limited.

    Poster entry deadline

  • Ashley Cottrell, Valerie Sherrard and Emily Farrar are participating in the 4-H Teen Leadership Academy, an eight-month program for teens from LaRue, Hardin, Meade, Grayson and Breckinridge counties. On Oct. 16-17, they participated in a retreat at Camp Loucon that emphasized leadership and communications skills as well as participation in the camp’s low ropes course.

  • Fall farm fun is attracting school and church groups with pumpkin patches, corn mazes and hay rides. Four LaRue County locations will be up and running by the weekend plus a fifth operation just north of the county line off Kentucky 210.

    Here’s a rundown of the offerings:

    Lee’s Garden Center, 1918 Bardstown Road, Hodgenville, 358-9897, www.leesgardencenter.com. Open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday-Saturday, 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday.

  • 4-H Rabbit Club

    The 4-H Rabbit Club will meet 10 a.m.-noon Oct. 31 at the LaRue County Extension Service office, 807 Old E’town Road. All members and interested persons are welcome.

     

  • When there’s something strange in the neighborhood, forget about calling Ghostbusters. Contact the Rev. Michael MacGowan, a plumber-turned-paranormal investigator, who’s on a real-life mission to bust ghosts.

    About three years ago, MacGowan — who relocated to the Ovesen Heights area of LaRue County from Oklahoma — believes he saw the spirit of his mother at her own graveside service. She appeared younger, with her arms folded, he said, and stood beside her grave before her body was buried. 

  • Many of my childhood memories revolve around the tiny general store in Ovesen Heights.

    It was a joy to go inside the little block building and listen to the owner, Boots Howell, and my mom swap stories.

    Boots would sell you one egg, one roll of toilet paper, enough flour to finish your biscuits or a postage stamp. She was a true believer in customer service.

    For 35 cents, you could get a quarter’s worth of pickle dog and a Coke.

  • A litter of abandoned kittens found their way into Lenore Hoover’s home and into the heart of her Australian shepherd, Sheba.

    The dog attentively licks the rat-size kittens clean each time that Hoover, Liz Fary and her other helpers feed the brood from tiny bottles. It’s an essential job that momma cats normally perform to stimulate a bowel movement for the babies.

    Sheba also gives the six kittens a thorough tongue bath once a day, Hoover said.

    “She always wanted to be a mother but couldn’t,” Mrs. Hoover says of her dog.

  • Buffalo Class of 1955

    The Buffalo High School Class of 1955 will have its 54th reunion at 6 pm. Nov. 14 at Paula’s Hot Biscuit Restaurant, 311 Water St., Hodgenville. For more information, call Lila Kirk at 358-8537, Gene Richards t 358-4759 or Mary Poteet at 358-4571.

    Class of 1985

    The LCHS Class of 1985 is planning its 25-year reunion. If you would like to help, call Susan Phipps Holt at 502-549-5226 or Paula McDowell-Wood at 270-735-3825.

  • Late fall and early winter is an optimum time to prepare spring-calving beef herds for reproductive success. Adequate nutrition from about 50 to 80 days prior to calving is critical to maximizing a cow’s ability to rebreed and maintain a 365-day calving interval. If a cow gets inadequate nutrition or is thin at calving and breeding, she will take longer to come into heat and will require more services to conceive.

  • The Farmers Market season closed last Thursday with Pat Durham of Durham Beef grilling locally raised beef. Durham set up three times over the course of the summer at the roadside stand adjacent to the LaRue County Extension Service. Ten vendors paid the season-long $15 fee to set up fresh produce and other locally produced farm products throughout the season. Others paid $10 for each single set up.  The Extension Service reinvests all the fees into the Farmers Market in the form of advertising, signage and related expenses.

  • Fall sewing classes

    Master Clothing Volunteer Rosa Smith will be offering beginning classes for adults on sewing and pattern fitting on Tuesday afternoons from Oct. 27 through Dec. 15. Classes will be held at the LaRue County Extension Service at 807 Old Elizabethtown Road, Hodgenville. Call 358-3401 for more information and to register. Class sizes are limited.

    Poster entry deadline

  • Fall sewing classes

    Master Clothing Volunteer Rosa Smith will be offering beginning classes for adults on sewing and pattern fitting on Tuesday afternoons from Oct. 27 through Dec. 15. Classes will be held at the LaRue County Extension Service at 807 Old Elizabethtown Road, Hodgenville. Call 358-3401 for more information and to register. Class sizes are limited.

    Poster entry deadline

  • Traditionally, the 4-H program has been for youth ages 9 to 18.

    Kentucky 4-H is taking steps to help the state’s younger children by using the 4-H Clover Bud program to help shape them become responsible, caring, hard-working individuals.