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Features

  • Late last winter, a large white bag arrived on the front doorstep of my friend’s home. For weeks, the two of us had waited for the slightly muddied bag to appear and when it did show up we were quite impressed.

  • As we get ready to begin a new year, it is good to review our livestock and grazing management practices. Let’s consider some things for each month of 2010 as you attempt to feed cattle through grazing as much as possible this year. Let’s begin with January, a month not suitable for grazing.

  • The Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association Convention will be Jan. 14-16 at the Hyatt Hotel and Lexington Convention Center, 401 W. High St., Lexington. The program, “Beef and Beyond,” will provide cattle producers the opportunity to learn about all aspects of beef production and meet other farmers from across the state.

    The forages program will spotlight the “Role and Importance of Clovers in Kentucky” and will continue to be a focus of the educational sessions. The program includes:

    •Why Grow Clovers – Dr. Don Ball

  • Jan. 7 – City may cut Main Street funding by 25 percent, Lincoln Bicentennial events planned for Feb. 11-12, Red Hill Cemetery opens new section, Mat Hawks defeat top-ranked Union County, Lady Hawks defeat Caverna; Deaths: Zula Mae Ackerman, Harold William Baker, M.D., Arthur Russell Gaines, William Jackson Edmonds, Wade G. Gibson, Robert Lindsey, Anna Lucille Allen Salazar, Freda Mable Underwood Thompson

  • The smell of vanilla and cinnamon scented candles and a variety of Christmas items fill Paula Conway’s new store in Upton.

    On Dec. 5, Conway hosted a ribbon-cutting event for The Country Gate store at 222 N. Walnut St.

    For Conway, owning her own shop is a dream that has been in the making for quite some time.

  • Two weeks ago, Ann “Snookie” Morrison was convinced that Grinch forces were at work to keep the annual Santa Bus run from occurring.

    Morrison and her volunteers, the Santa’s Helpers, noticed toy donations were down, yet the community need was great. On top of that, the bus itself developed engine problems.

    “I was getting ready to throw my hands up,” she said. “I was really worried about it and afraid we would have to ration.”

    But, as always seems to happen, the 43rd run came together at the last minute, Morrison said.

  • Numerous 4-H members and volunteers were recognized at the annual 4-H awards banquet.

    Based on points earned for 4-H activities completed during the 2008-09 4-H year, Mere­dith Heath was the 2009 Outstanding Senior 4-H Member for ages 14-18.

    Based on the same point system, Hallie Mad­riaga was recognized as the 2009 Out­standing Junior Division 4-H Member for ages 9-13.

  • Numerous 4-H members and volunteers were recognized at the annual 4-H awards banquet.

    Based on points earned for 4-H activities completed during the 2008-09 4-H year, Mere­dith Heath was the 2009 Outstanding Senior 4-H Member for ages 14-18.

    Based on the same point system, Hallie Mad­riaga was recognized as the 2009 Out­standing Junior Division 4-H Member for ages 9-13.

  • Numerous 4-H members and volunteers were recognized at the annual 4-H awards banquet.

    Based on points earned for 4-H activities completed during the 2008-09 4-H year, Mere­dith Heath was the 2009 Outstanding Senior 4-H Member for ages 14-18.

    Based on the same point system, Hallie Mad­riaga was recognized as the 2009 Out­standing Junior Division 4-H Member for ages 9-13.

  • Scott Shultz, chief of interpretation, visitor services, and resource management at Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park, has experienced the life of Abraham Lincoln from a perspective that few have enjoyed.

    Before coming to the Hodgenville site in early November, he spent the past seven years as a park ranger and historian at Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C., the site of Lincoln’s assassination.

  • Winter is here and with it will come the possibility of cold stress on livestock. The three most important things livestock producers need to do to protect livestock from cold stresses is provide sufficient water, ample high-quality feed and weather protection.

    Cold stress reduces livestock productivity including rate of gain, milk production and reproductive difficulty and can cause disease problems.

  • A LaRue County couple is the winner of Kentucky Farm Bureau’s Outstanding Young Farm Family contest.

    Aaron and Ashley Reding of Howardstown won a Case IH Scout courtesy of KFB Insurance, $1,000 cash from Premier Crop Insurance, a $1,500 voucher from Pioneer Seed, a $500 voucher from Southern States Cooperative, a $600 voucher from Miles Seed, $500 from Dodge and a portable safe from Misty Morn Safe Company. They also get an expense-paid trip to compete in AFBF’s national young farmer finals next month in Washington.

  • Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer said Monday that he is saddened by the passing of Mike Ovesen, 63, the longtime chief executive officer of the Kentucky Pork Producers Association who died Sunday.

    “Mike was one of Kentucky agriculture’s most stalwart leaders and one of the state’s foremost advocates for unity and teamwork among the various farm groups. But more importantly, he was a good friend,” Farmer said. “Kentucky will miss his leadership. I extend my deepest sympathies to his wife, Kathy, and the rest of his family.”

  • Residents of Kentucky who join the Arbor Day Foundation in January will receive 10 free flowering trees just by becoming a member.

    The free trees are part of the nonprofit Foundation’s Trees for America campaign.

    For those who join the Foundation in January, they will receive two white flowering dogwoods, two flowering crabapples, two Washington hawthorns, two American redbuds and two golden raintrees.

  • ALL SCHOOLS

    Jan. 18 - Martin Luther King Jr. Day, no school

    ALES

    Jan. 19 – Curriculum & Instruction Committee 6 pm.

    Jan. 19 – PTO 6:30 p.m.

    Jan. 20 – 4-H, 12:30 and 1:30 p.m.

    LCHS

    Site based council to meet

    The LaRue County High School site-based council will meet 4:30 p.m. today in the conference room.

    LCMS

    Jan. 14 – Boys basketball vs. Adair, 6 p.m.

    Jan. 16 – Speech and Debate Tournament at LCMS

  • Building a fence to keep animals out of your garden is not something to be taken lightly, but it may be the only way to put an end to the feasting of marauding critters. One groundhog can make your broccoli patch disappear overnight. One deer can cut your perennials down to nubs in the same amount of time. A neighborhood cat can turn your garden into a litter box.

  • Backed by a nearly $750,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Kentucky Cooperative Extension will offer a comprehensive training program for beginning farmers and those who are thinking about taking up farming.

    The Kentucky’s whole farm management education program, A Common Field, is a two-year course offered in 20 areas of the state. It will include face-to-face educational meetings at county extension offices, on-farm demonstrations and, in the second year, a mentor program that will connect beginning farmers with experienced producers.

  • January brings several farm-related state annual meetings and state programs important to LaRue County and Kentucky farmers.  

    The annual Kentucky Fruit and Vegetable Conference and Trade Show will be held in Lexington at the Embassy Suites Hotel Jan. 4 and 5. The event features the 154th annual meeting of the Kentucky State Horticulture Society, the 39th Annual Meeting of the Kentucky Vegetable Grower’s Association, and the first meeting of the Organic Association of Kentucky.

  • The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board, chaired by Gov. Steve Beshear, approved changes to the County Agricultural Investment Program, during its monthly board meeting Dec. 18 in Lexington.

    CAIP was adopted in 2009 and was designed to provide farmers with incentives to encourage investments that improve current production practices and assist in diversifying farming operations.

    The most significant changes are related to fertilizer, labor, transport equipment and the annual producer maximum.  

  • Watch Night at Freedom Way

    Freedom Way Church in Cecilia will have its watch night service at 8 p.m. Thursday. Various singing groups will be followed by a sermon by the Rev. Ronnie McCowan. Dinner will follow at 10 p.m. with host pastor, the Rev. Billy Curle.