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Features

  • The small puppy, cupped in the hands of Taylor County Animal Shelter Director John Harris, looks around at his new home. In the background, a chorus of barks erupts and the puppy’s ears perk up.

    He may have a new home, but he’s not alone. This animal shelter is full.

    And, according to Harris, the shelter is applying for grant funding to expand for a third time.

  • Baseball cards, stamps, coins and even rocks have helped create extensive collections for many people. However, there are few collections that can be truly meaningful for an entire community like the recent find by Carl Howell, Hodgenville attorney and Lincoln historian.

    Howell’s grandfather built the Nancy Lincoln Inn near the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park and helped him develop his love for history, specifically for Abraham Lincoln. Now, he excitedly shares the news of his latest discovery with hopes that it will inspire interest and further research.

  • A Hodgenville funeral home is under new management after the retirement of a long-time employee.

    Billy Howell, director of Billy Howell Funeral Chapel on Lincoln Boulevard, retired in October after an extended illness. He now is living with relatives.

    Rondal Wright, who has owned the funeral home nine years, began looking for a new manager. He turned to Ron Rust, a Lyons Station native who owned funeral homes in New Haven and Boston and is a close friend of Howell.

  • Most of us contemplate what God is thinking when he allows bizarre or terrible things to happen in our lives. Why does such a loving God allow homes, relationships and even families to be broken? 

    Rusty Wilson, youth minister at Union Christian Church, addresses those questions in his upcoming album titled, “I’ll make It Heaven.” This Christian centered, 11-track album talks about relationships – friendships, romantic relationships, families and ultimately our relationship with Christ.

  • Skipping breakfast can spell disaster. A study that randomly assigned overweight people to a weight program found that those who consumed breakfast lost significantly more weight over a 12-week program. This could be because those who skip breakfast tend to select more calorie-dense foods later in the day, than those who regularly eat breakfast. A healthy breakfast is the one meal that people should be encouraged to eat even if they are not hungry.

    This information is from the Web site foodandhealth.com:

    Practical solutions to manage your weight 

  • 18th Century Market Fair

    The 18th Century Market Fair hosted by the Bucksnort Longhunters will be noon-7 p.m. Feb. 5 and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Feb. 6 at Pritchard Community Center in Elizabethtown. Admission is $4 for adults, children 12 and younger are free. For more information call Danny Hill at 369-6129. 

    Extension Council to meet

  • The Extension Leadership Banquet will be held 7 p.m. Jan. 25 at the LaRue County Extension Office. Reserve your spot by calling the Extension Service office at 358-3401. Tickets are $6 each and the meal will be provided by the Crosstown Homemakers. The Bobby McDowell Award of Excellence will be presented.

  • Every year, Philip Morris International, through its International Tobacco Procurement Scholarship program, provides financial assistance to hundreds of U.S. students from tobacco-growing families. In 2009, 30 new students were awarded scholarships. Since the program’s inception in 2001, more than 350 students have been awarded nearly $1.5 million in educational scholarships.

    Scholarships are available to the dependent children of tobacco growers who are part of PMI’s ITP program. The program offers three types of scholarships: 

  • NARFE to meet

    The Elizabethtown Local Chapter 1050 of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association will meet 11 a.m. Feb. 1 at Nolin RECC. Potluck, bring a favorite, soup, chili or dessert. All active and retired federal civil service employees are encouraged to attend. For more information, call Betty Hundley at 765-7107.

    Senior Citizens music

  • USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program. Landowners may apply for WHIP at any time. However, applications received by Jan. 29 will be evaluated and considered for the 2010 program year. Applications received after that date will be held until the next evaluation period.

  • USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program. Landowners may apply for WHIP at any time. However, applications received by Jan. 29 will be evaluated and considered for the 2010 program year. Applications received after that date will be held until the next evaluation period.

  • USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is accepting applications for the Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program. Landowners may apply for WHIP at any time. However, applications received by Jan. 29 will be evaluated and considered for the 2010 program year. Applications received after that date will be held until the next evaluation period.

  • Hay is the major source of winter feed for beef cattle and considerable effort and cost goes into producing the hay. This effort and cost increases concern as hay feeding losses increase. Hay losses can be expected with any hay feeding system, however the amount of loss varies with the particular system used.  Small square bales fed properly generally have less loss than do large round bales.

  • On the day after Christmas, David Miller of Hodgenville found what he had been seeking for more than 45 years – his half-sister.

    “This was the best Christmas present I could have asked for,” Miller said after reuniting with his sibling, Jayne Allen, at LaRue County Sportsman’s Lake. 

    Finding her was a combination of coincidence, collaboration and persistence.

  • The topic of farm record keeping is about as glamorous as dirt. Farmers will talk about beef cattle, corn varieties, weeds, tobacco insects, weather and chemicals all day long, and sometimes late into the night. But, if you mention recordkeeping, farmers slip away quickly (I might mention, this aversion to recordkeeping is not unique to farmers).

  • Old-Fashioned Sunday at Buffalo

    Buffalo Baptist Church will have an “Old-Fashioned Sunday” Jan. 31. Beginning at 11 a.m., the service will consist of old-time singing and preaching, followed by dinner on the grounds. The evening service at 6 will feature old-fashioned acoustical music. Singers and groups will include Rusty Gate Quartet, Ronnie Benningfield, Gordon Thomas and The Buffalo Women’s Quartet. Call 325-3820 for more information.

  • Wranglers fundraiser

    The Wranglers 4-H Club will hold an auction and chili supper 4-8 p.m. Jan. 23 at the LaRue County Extension Service office, Old E’town Road. For more information, contact volunteer club leader Brad Florence at 358-8170.

  • Lester Pearsall has had a love for trains ever since Santa brought a Lionel set to him and his brother when he was a 6-year-old kid growing up in Valley Station.

    It was a trip to the Kentucky Railway Museum for his 50th birthday three years ago, however, that rekindled the Mt. Sherman resident’s love for life on the rails.

    “They let me ride in the cab of the locomotive, and, it was a blast,” Pearsall said. “I was hooked.”

  • Beef producers in LaRue, Hardin and Meade counties have the opportunity again in 2010 to participate in the Heartland Master Cattlemen Program. This outstanding program was developed and is delivered by University of Kentucky College of Agriculture Extension Specialists. It receives financial assistance through the Kentucky Agriculture Development Board.