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Features

  • The 4-H Poetry Contest is being held again this year. The contest is open to LaRue County youth, ages 9 to 18. Each youth may enter one poem for the competition.

    All poems must be submitted to the Extension Service office by Feb. 1. Most students have probably already written poems for school. Why not turn your best poem in to be judged? Teachers, you may even wish to require your students to participate in the poetry contest or give extra credit for those students who participate.

  • 4-H Camp

    Applications are available for 4-H Summer Camp. LaRue County will attend camp June 29-July 2. The cost is $150 per child. Activities include arts and crafts, sports, nature and high ropes. Camp is open to LaRue County youth ages 9 to 14, as of Jan. 1. Youth must be in grades 3 to 8 and also meet the age requirement. For an application, stop by the Extension Office, 807 Old Elizabethtown Road, Hodgenville or call 358-3401. A $75 deposit is required with the registration form in order to hold the spot for that child.  Space is limited.

     

  • Cash hay sales can be an income source for the farmer who is willing to provide good management and to work at quality hay production and marketing. Several LaRue County farmers are already involved in hay production and/or marketing, and many producers sell hay from time to time. Let’s briefly discuss 10 management tips that can help you generate the most profit from this enterprise.

  • The American Red Cross will conduct several classes in February. Classes will be held at the office at 405 W. Dixie Ave., Elizabethtown unless otherwise noted. Call 270-765-4979 to register or more information.

    Active duty military discounts are now available, but must be requested at time of payment.

    Feb. 22 – Adult, Child & Infant CPR/AED, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., $50

  • As a young child growing up in the Barren Run section of LaRue County, Kyle Williamson wasn’t really hard-headed or stubborn; he just liked to ask questions, to find out why, to just about any subject that came up.

    “I think, at times, my questioning probably caused big problems for Mom and Dad (Mike and Kathy Williamson),” the 25-year-old man, who recently opened a law office in Hodgenville, said. 

  • Kentucky students are invited to create posters and write essays based on the theme “Kentucky Proud: Growing a Healthy Kentucky” in the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s annual Poster and Essay Contest.

    Participating students in grades kindergarten through 12 will create posters and write brief essays describing their posters and the theme. A winning entry will be chosen in each grade level, and each winning student will receive a $100 savings bond. The winning posters and essays will be printed in a 2011 calendar with Kentucky Proud recipes.

  • Grain Marketing Short Course

    A Grain Marketing Short Course will be 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Feb. 17 and 24 at the Hardin County Extension Service in Elizabethtown. Various elements of grain marketing will be discussed including cash contracts, futures, basis, hedging, ACRE, crop insurance and marketing strategies. Enrollment is limited and there is a $20 registration fee. For enrollment or for more information, contact the LaRue County Extension Office at 358-3401. 

               

  • Cloverbuds meet

    The 4-H Cloverbuds will meet 3:15-4:30 p.m. Feb. 11 at the Extension Service office. The Cloverbuds club is open to LaRue County youth ages 5 to 8 or in kindergarten through third grade. New members are welcome to attend. For more information, call 358-3401.

  • Bone-chilling temperatures have gripped much of the country, and the American Red Cross urges everyone to be safe and prepare as much as possible.

  • Mandy Thompson, 13, smoothed light green paint on her sheet of drawing paper with a paintbrush, carefully copying the picture of a daisy.

    As she considered her work, she tilted her head.

    “I think it’s OK,” she declared in a voice barely above a whisper. “It could be better.”

  • Gary Pearman has been selected as the 2009-2010 winner of the ExCEL award for Elizabethtown Independent Schools. Pearman is an English teacher at T.K. Stone Middle School.

    The ExCEL award, which stands for Excellence in Classroom and Educational Leadership, is an education award given to several school systems in the region. It’s sponsored by WHAS-TV and E.ON. U.S., a Louisville energy company.

  • 4-H Camp

  • Grain Marketing Short Course

    A Grain Marketing Short Course will be 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Feb. 17 and 24 at the Hardin County Extension Service office in Elizabethtown. Various elements of grain marketing will be discussed including cash contracts, futures, basis, hedging, ACRE, crop insurance and marketing strategies. Enrollment is limited and there is a $20 registration fee. For enrollment or for more information, contact the LaRue County Extension Service at 358-3401. 

    Goat College

  • Farm Kids for College

    A $1,000 Farm Kids for College scholarship is available to LaRue County seniors planning to pursue an ag-related degree. Application available at nfo.org. Follow drop-down menu under About Us to Scholarships. Essay and letters of reference required. Applications due March 15 to Clara J. Wheatley, 925 Wayne Ennis Road, Howardstown, KY 40051. For more information, contact Perry Garner at 1-800-247-2110, Ext. 4674, or pgarner@nfo.org.

    Class of 1968 Memorial

  • ALES

    Feb. 17 – Academic team practice, 3-4 p.m.

    Feb. 18 – ADHD workshop, 6 p.m.

    Feb. 23 – PTO, 6:30 p.m.

    Feb. 24 – Academic team practice 3-4 p.m.

    LCHS

    Project Graduation spaghetti dinner

  • There is a lot of information about exercise available. It can be found on TV, in magazines or newspapers, on the Internet and even on the radio. With so much information out there, it can sometimes be hard to tell the fact from the fiction.

    Here are 10 common exercise myths and why they are not true:

  • LaRue County Health Department

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, about 7,500 lives have been saved by the proper use of child restraints during the past 20 years. Yet, motor vehicle crashes still remain the number one killer of children ages 4 to 14 in America. The reason? Too often it is the improper use or non-use of child safety seats and booster seats.

  • A few hundred feet down Hall-Gaddie Road, about a mile south of Lincoln Farm, is an attention-getting sign nailed onto a utility pole.

    “Welcome to Gaddieville. Bobbie Gaddie, Mayor,” the sign states.

    Although the “town” isn’t officially incorporated, the residents certainly have a legitimate claim to it, for the Gaddie family has owned that land through four generations, more than 100 years.

  • The small puppy, cupped in the hands of Taylor County Animal Shelter Director John Harris, looks around at his new home. In the background, a chorus of barks erupts and the puppy’s ears perk up.

    He may have a new home, but he’s not alone. This animal shelter is full.

    And, according to Harris, the shelter is applying for grant funding to expand for a third time.

  • Baseball cards, stamps, coins and even rocks have helped create extensive collections for many people. However, there are few collections that can be truly meaningful for an entire community like the recent find by Carl Howell, Hodgenville attorney and Lincoln historian.

    Howell’s grandfather built the Nancy Lincoln Inn near the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park and helped him develop his love for history, specifically for Abraham Lincoln. Now, he excitedly shares the news of his latest discovery with hopes that it will inspire interest and further research.