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Features

  • The community of Creal is about a mile from Mount Sherman and just over the Green County line on Ky. 61.

    According to Kentucky Place Names, it’s located on the Tom Bill Branch of Brush Creek. It was named for a prominent early Green and Russell County family.

    Its post office was in operation from 1883 to 1919 and was called Dezarn for the family of its first postmaster, Elisha Dezarn, according to the Register of the United States.

  • Long before electric instruments and microphones became popular in music, an acoustic country band from Mount Sherman, The Lincoln Serenaders, claimed fame performing in area schools and at social functions.

    The five-man band consisted of Clyde F. Benningfield (“Short Clyde” to differentiate him from longtime Mount Sherman businessman and postmaster Clyde R. Benningfield), Hal Jones Childress, brothers Floyd and Wayne Hill, and Ray Warren.

  • There are plenty of talented athletes but few make the jump to professional sports.

    One of Mount Sherman’s own made waves in pro baseball in the 1920s.
    Herman S. “Hi” Bell, was born July 16, 1897, to Nathaniel and Martha Ann Holthouser Bell.

    Nathaniel, also known as “Nathan,” was the eldest son of Moses Thomas and Elizabeth Anderson Bell. He was a 20-year-old farmer at the time of his marriage in 1891 to 17-year-old “Mattie.”

  • At the turn of the century, an area near Mount Sherman became known as “dog gallus” or “dog gallows.”

    The story, as told by Gary Gardner, goes .... a group of young men had imbibed some “liquid corn refreshment,” near the Old Sherman Cemetery. Their entertainment for the evening was to shut up for good an old howling hound dog by hanging it from one of the boys’s pair of galluses or suspenders. The name stuck and for many years, residents of the area would say, “I’m going home to Dog Gallus.”
     

  • Local historians believe Mount Sherman was named after Major General William Tecumseh Sherman, one of the Union’s military leaders during the Civil War.

    No one seems to be certain, however, just why the small town opted to recognize one of the most notorious generals of the war.

    Sherman was promoted to brigadier general after the Battle of First Manassas and sent to Kentucky. President Abraham Lincoln thought Sherman could keep the state from seceding. Sherman made a statement that the war would not end quickly and was replaced by Don Carlos Buell.

  • During the 1950s to 1970s, a small dry goods store in Mount Sherman provided LaRue and surrounding counties with boots and blue jeans. “Benningfield’s” or better known as “Clyde’s” – named after proprietor Clyde Benningfield – sold the first Levi’s in the area.

  • E.S. Ferrill shared this information about his grandfather, William Ferrill. (The story was found on a genealogical website.)

    William Ferrill came to LaRue County (then Kentucky County, Virginia), from Culpepper, Va., in 1788. He came when a very small child with his mother, a young widow.

    His mother’s brothers, John and James Howell, accompanied them on horseback.

  • In LaRue County’s history, there have been few entrepreneurs to match Edward Stanton Ferrill.

    Ferrill, the grandfather of Linda Back of Hodgenville, turned a small drugstore in Buffalo into a booming wholesale business during a time when almost every other business was struggling or going belly-up.

    The secret to his success? He never went into a new venture until he had the cash saved to start it.

    “E.S.” as he was known, was born Feb. 19, 1862, to Henry and Mary Jane Ray Ferrill. He was raised on a farm on the Rolling Fork River.

  • The Buffalo Elementary School’s gym has a history that reaches back to the 1800s when it was built not as a gymnasium, but as an academic wing of East Lynn College, which longtime Buffalo resident John T. Meers said originally opened in 1860.


    “The original structure was T-shaped and what is now the gym contained classrooms which the college used,” Meers said. “When they separated the two buildings, they moved a section that became a lunchroom on the bottom floor and Masonic and Eastern Star lodge above, and the other part became a gym.”


  • Growing up in Buffalo in the 1930s and ‘40s was a lot like living in the idyllic, if fictional, Mayberry, according to local businessman Joel Ray Sprowls.

    “Everything was laid back; there was no rushing around like today,” said Sprowls, who attended Mount Tabor School and graduated from Buffalo High School in 1946.

    Though the atmosphere was relaxed, Sprowls and the other kids in town always found plenty to occupy them.

  • As far as local historians can tell, Buffalo started with the first house built by James Creal in 1848. In 1854, a gristmill was built on the creek, and the next year the Rev. John Duncan and W. L. Creal built a general merchandise store.
    One day in the Duncan-Creal store, someone brought in a large animal bone. It was agreed that it was the rib of a Buffalo since there were buffalo wallows along the creek. Someone suggested they should name their town “Buffalo Wallow.”

    Fortunately, “Wallow” was dropped in following years.

  • Jodi Johnson gives riding lessons at Wayne Ridge Farm outside Upton.

    Johnson, who says horses have the ability to “speak to you and heal you,” has the responsibility of helping children and horses communicate when human interaction is particularly difficult.

    She oversees a therapeutic program for autistic children, where kids with the disorder come to ride horses, improve their motor skills and increase their communication ability.

  • The Upton branch of West Point Bank is not an ordinary bank with ordinary decorations.

    Instead, it resembles a small museum.

    From the first moment that you walk through the doors, your eyes are drawn to the large and dark stained, glossy bar that is the teller’s castle.

    The bar, patented in December of 1903, was purchased by the bank’s founder, Joe Tobin, in the sunny state of California. It was placed in the building before its opening day in 2008.