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Features

  • A one-room schoolhouse with the original chalkboard still inside, sits off to the side of a yard on Raine Road.

    Bright green leaves from nearby trees and long shoots of grass have grown up around the bare boards, that were once painted a crisp white.

    Odds and ends fill the inside where student chairs and desks once sat.
    A single light bulb hangs down from the darkened paneled ceiling –the only internal addition.

  • Pleasant Grove Baptist Church was established 161 years ago on Sept. 11, 1852, nine years before the start of the Civil War.

    In the church history it is recorded that a group of believers met in the middle of a cluster of sycamore trees, which is how the church got its name.

    The original church building was built of logs in 1853, but was replaced with a new building dedicated on May 5, 1897.

  • The small community of White City is about five miles outside of Hodgenville on Bardstown Road. It was established sometime in the 1800’s as an unincorporated community.

    It was registered in the U.S. Department of the Interior’s geographical database on Sept. 20, 1979.

    According to Robert M. Rennick, author of Kentucky Place Names, White City was given its name from a man who visited the area.

  • There have been many theories throughout the course of history that have suggested animals can heal human hurts.

    Animal therapy has become a well-used practice in working with troubled adults and children alike, using cats and dogs as intervention “therapists.”

    However, Jeff Grams and Harold Beismer of Second Chance Youth Ranch outside Magnolia, utilize much larger animals – horses.

  • Homestead Family Farms was recently awarded Environmental Certification by Validus for their commitment to environmental cropland stewardship.

    “We’re very pleased to be receiving this recognition again this year,” said Aaron Reding, Homestead Family Farms. “This is our fourth year of recognition and we are excited about what the certification has provided us.”

  • The 35th annual Howardstown Homecoming was held Aug. 4 at Saint Ann’s Church.

    The popular event started in 1978 with picnic on the grounds. Now, second and third generations of Howardstown families are enjoying the festivities.

    “The grounds were filled with a lot of people this year,” said Lois Cecil, principal at Saint Ann’s School.

  • At one time small towns had one or two major stores to supply food and other supplies. These stores often were the central “hot spot” for visiting with neighbors and sharing a bit of gossip.

    For Howardstown, the local hot spot was the old F.M. Head store.

    Also called the Howardstown Grocery, Howard Brother’s store, and Head’s Grocery, the business was established in 1875 by Joe Howard, the founder of Howardstown.

  • Union Band Baptist Church outside Howardstown was established in 1856 by members of the Stiles family.

    The original church building was located on a hill near to where the church is now. According to Herbie “Herb” Stevenson, former pastor of UBBC, “lightning hit it and they had to rebuild.”

    The white frame building was completed in 1924. It has double entry doors used to separate the genders. Men used the right door; women used the left.

    The building is surrounded by six acres but the congregation once owned several more acres.

  • Charles Simms III, chief circuit judge for LaRue, Nelson and Hart Counties, is an alumnus of Saint Ann’s School in Howardstown.

    Simms attended the small school in 6th, 7th and 8th grades. He attended Saint Catherine’s in New Haven for grades 1-5.

    He called his time at Saint Ann’s “a wonderful experience.”

    There were five other students in his 8th grade class: Anna Bowling, Jerry Mouser, Scott Johnson, Joey Holcomb and Archie Spalding. They got to know each other well.

  • The Louisville Archdiocese website http://www.archlou.org provides background on Saint Ann’s Catholic Church in Howardstown.

    It reads:
    Before a Catholic church was built in Howardstown, priests coming from Hodgenville would swim or wade the Rolling Fork River to celebrate Mass in private homes. The first Saint Ann Church was erected between 1862 and 1865 on the site of the present cemetery, and the first school was built nearby.

  • As a light breeze wisps through the dark green leaves of the trees in the rolling knobs of Howardstown, a schoolgirl skips up to and peeks around the corner of a small white building.

    It appears to be a house. But when the girl, in her khaki pants and navy polo, opens one of the bright blue doors, you’ll see classrooms and students inside. The building is one of the oldest schools in the area – Saint Ann’s.

  • Members of Hardin County Playhouse believe life beyond our planet is likely.

    Whether they believe it will arrive on Earth in a manner that in any way resembles its latest production is another matter.

    Man-eating alien plants, ’50s and ’60s rhythm and blues, a Greek chorus and a skid row flower shop are some of the elements woven into the storyline of “Little Shop of Horrors.” The HCP production opens tonight at Plum Alley Theater in the Historic State Theater complex in Elizabethtown.

  • The Kentucky Legislature in 1918 made it unlawful for anyone to buy, bargain, sell, loan, have in possession, or to operate or aid, abet, or encourage in the operation, or to harbor a person in the possession or in the operation of an illicit or “moonshine” still.

    This was known as Prohibition – a “social experiment” that lasted about 10 years.

    Violating the law could lead to fines of $50 to $500 or imprisonment of up to six months. Second offenders could spend up to five years in jail.