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Features

  • That’s right. You saw what you saw.

    Today’s edition of The LaRue County Herald News is printed on pink paper.

    We hope to make a point with the pink paper about Breast Cancer Awareness Month. It is a terrible disease that thousands of people suffer from in this country. Chances are, every reader of this issue has been touched by the disease in some way, whether they or a family member suffer from it, or they know someone who has.

    Inside are stories about breast cancer — who can get it and how steps you can take to reduce your risk.

  • Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women, second only to lung cancer. One in eight women is expected to develop breast cancer in her lifetime, and a recent survey by the Society for Women’s Health Research found that 22 percent of women named breast cancer as the disease they fear most. The specter of breast cancer makes it no surprise that women are eager to seek various ways to reduce their risks of developing this potentially deadly disease.

  • At the age of 12 to 15, many young women are experiencing the body and life changes that accompany adolescence. It can be difficult to imagine that breasts that are just beginning to develop may contain cancer. But such is the reality for some girls.

  • Last week’s story about the Maxine store contained an inaccuracy.

    Kathy Ross, a granddaughter of Albert Hazle, who built the store, provided the correct information.

    Albert Hazle was born in 1901.

    He and his wife Ora opened the store in the early 1920s. It was located about a quarter mile from the Ky. 357 and 1517 crossroads.

    Ross’ father, Charles “Red” Hazle, was born in Maxine.

  • Tucked away near Tucker Creek lies Tucker Cemetery.

    Established in the 1850s, the cemetery is located on the west side of highway 357 between Maxine and Tanner; however, it is no longer visible from the road due to surrounding foliage.

    The cemetery, although unknown to passers by, contains the graves of a one-time prominent family of LaRue County – the Tuckers.

    Anderson Tucker and Nancy Hawkins Tucker married in 1820 in Stokes County, N.C., before making the trek to Kentucky in 1842.

  • Oak Hill School was picture perfect with its white painted clapboards, a large post with an iron bell and pull chord out front, and a magnificent cedar tree reaching its branches just behind it.

    Only a few decades ago the one-room schoolhouse stood behind Oak Hill Baptist Church, the first church established in the Maxine area. The school and church were built in the 1850s.

    The family of Anderson and Nancy Tucker were the original owners of the land the school was built on.

  • Oak Hill Baptist Church rests in a bend on Oak Hill Road, surrounded by oak trees –which is how the church received its name.

    A little more than 157 years ago, on April 30, 1856, 35 former members of Three Forks Bacon Creek Baptist Church signed a petition to separate to form Oak Hill Baptist Church.

  • Nancy McCubbin, once a Pennington, grew up in Maxine and watched as the small community changed over the years.

    “It was quite different from today,” said McCubbin.

    “I remember Maxine – Maggard’s store. It was there for years and was more of a general store. They sold a small amount of things that you could get at Wal-Mart today.”

    McCubbin said she grew up living next to the store on Oak Hill Road.

  • Maxine’s name, although a mystery, was thought to have received its name from the Maxine Store, the long-standing main establishment in the quaint community.

    The store was first opened by Albert and Millie Hazle in the late 1800s, and was then sold to Mattie and Harvey Ward, who ran the store for several years.

    John Edward “Ed” and Halcye Wheeler ran the store from the 1920s to the 1960s.  

  • Maxine, a small community located in LaRue County close to the Hart County Line, was once considered to be a sub section or hamlet of Hammonville.

    Hammonville also spelled as Hammonsville or Hammondville is 3.5 miles south of Maxine, in Hart County.

    According to the Geographic Names Information System Maxine is considered to be an unincorporated, populated place located in LaRue County with a geographic pinpoint location of latitude 37.465 and longitude -85.796. It’s at 253 feet above sea level.

  • In its heyday, White City was the home of several stores and was once considered to be a main stop on the way between Hodgenville and other towns such as Elizabethtown or New Haven.

    According to Richard Taylor, a former long-time resident of White City, there were once four stores and a supermarket located in the area.

    The first store to come to town was Anderson’s, run by William “Bill” Anderson, the same Anderson that was visited by Mr. Morrison, credited with coming up with the hamlet’s name.

  • Saint Joachim Catholic Church Cemetery, one of the oldest cemeteries in LaRue County, is about a mile east of White City on Howardstown Road.

    The church was established about 1850 by Father Thomas A. Mulhall Sr., the son of Thomas Kempis Mulhall Sr., who emigrated from Ireland in the early 1800’s.

    Thomas A. Mulhall Sr. built a log cabin church in the White City area that was not far from where the cemetery is located.

    The church was once referred to as Mulhall Chapel. It burned a couple of decades later.  

  • Despite his many family ties in Kentucky, Thomas Lincoln was a wanderer. First settling in Elizabethtown with his new bride, he became restless and moved to the Sinking Spring Farm in LaRue County. In 1809, he bought land on Knob Creek, only a few miles east of Sinking Spring.

    After a land dispute in 1816, he again packed up and set off for Indiana with wife Nancy, daughter Sarah, and son Abraham, leaving behind only two small cabins which quickly fell to ruin.

  • Nancy Belle Raine moved to White City with her husband Roy, on Feb. 7, 1953.

    Raine said there are many things she remembers about the small community that reflect its rich past.

    The old location of Pleasant Grove Baptist Church, a long-standing congregation of White City, was said to have served as a hospital during the Civil War.

    Roy Raines’ brother, Walter, served as the caretaker of Pleasant Grove cemetery for a number of years, and mentioned the tale of the church converting to a temporary hospital for wounded soldiers.

  • A one-room schoolhouse with the original chalkboard still inside, sits off to the side of a yard on Raine Road.

    Bright green leaves from nearby trees and long shoots of grass have grown up around the bare boards, that were once painted a crisp white.

    Odds and ends fill the inside where student chairs and desks once sat.
    A single light bulb hangs down from the darkened paneled ceiling –the only internal addition.

  • Pleasant Grove Baptist Church was established 161 years ago on Sept. 11, 1852, nine years before the start of the Civil War.

    In the church history it is recorded that a group of believers met in the middle of a cluster of sycamore trees, which is how the church got its name.

    The original church building was built of logs in 1853, but was replaced with a new building dedicated on May 5, 1897.

  • The small community of White City is about five miles outside of Hodgenville on Bardstown Road. It was established sometime in the 1800’s as an unincorporated community.

    It was registered in the U.S. Department of the Interior’s geographical database on Sept. 20, 1979.

    According to Robert M. Rennick, author of Kentucky Place Names, White City was given its name from a man who visited the area.

  • There have been many theories throughout the course of history that have suggested animals can heal human hurts.

    Animal therapy has become a well-used practice in working with troubled adults and children alike, using cats and dogs as intervention “therapists.”

    However, Jeff Grams and Harold Beismer of Second Chance Youth Ranch outside Magnolia, utilize much larger animals – horses.