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Features

  • Kimberley Gaye “Kricket” Atwood has been singing since she was knee-high to a grasshopper.  
    That love for music, which tagged her with her nickname, has powered a career that has led her from singing on stage to being a radio disc jockey to owning a country music show, Kricket’s Music Ranch in West Point.
    “My dad gave me the name Kricket; he said I was always singing and making noise,” Atwood explained “It has always stuck, in country music and in radio.”

  • Lincoln Chapter 3 of DeMolay is sponsored by B.R. Young Masonic Lodge of Hodgenville. The Lincoln Chapter holds meetings from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. the first and third Saturday of each month.

  • If you watched television in the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s in Louisville, you know the Atcher family name. Randy Atcher was one of the icons of early WHAS television programs.  Relatives of the Atchers are hosting an Atcher family reunion June 11 in West Point.
    Dr. David Atcher of Lexington has led the coordination of the reunion with the help of other family relatives.

  • Sgt. James H. Davenport entered the U.S. Army at Fort Thomas, Ky. Feb. 1, 1944.
    He completed basic training at Fort McClellan, Ala., Fort Meade, Md. and Camp Pickett, Va. and served with the 310th Infantry Regiment, 78th Infantry Division.
    He was killed in action March 10, 1945, in the World War II Battle of Remagen in Germany.
    Davenport was awarded the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart with two Oak Leaf Clusters.

  • Lisa Saettel and James Rock, both of Hodgenville, announce their engagement and forthcoming wedding.
    The bride to be is the daughter of John Saettel of Colesburg and Rita Stengel of Magnolia and is the granddaughter of the late Mary Saettel and the late Doc and Mabel Dennison.
    She is a homemaker and 1987 graduate of Doss High School in Louisville.
    The prospective groom is the son of Jimmy and Bonita Rock of Hodgenville and is the grandson of Sue Rock and Norma Fox, both of Hodgenville.
    He is a farmer.

  • Sharon Richardson of Elizabethtown and Eric Puckett of Leitchfield would like to announce the engagement of their daughter, Kayla E. Puckett, to Caleb M. Ernst, son of Bob and Sharon Ernst of Buffalo.
    Kayla, a 2007 graduate of Elizabethtown High School, is an English major student at Western Kentucky University. Caleb is a 2006 graduate of LaRue County High School and a 2010 graduate of Western Kentucky University with a bachelor’s degree in English.
    The wedding will be June 11. Formal invitations will be sent.

  • Heath Seymour is the new executive director of the Elizabethtown-Hardin County Heritage Council.
    Returning to his hometown after a roughly 15-year absence, the soft-spoken Seymour will soon be heading a mammoth effort to revitalize downtown as outlined by Mayor Tim Walker. The task is an expansion on Seymour’s new role as executive director of the Elizabethtown-Hardin County Heritage Council.
    Seymour replaces Dana Beth Lyddan, who left Elizabethtown in December to relocate with her husband to Indiana.

  • An old adage says that charity begins at home.
    A group of local volunteers is putting that proverb into action through generous donations of time, money and construction materials.
    They’re building Bruce Brown a new house.
    The Gleanings man lived in a small frame house at the edge of LaRue and Marion County for most of his life. The century-old house was in bad shape, he said, but he had mixed emotions when it was torn down a few weeks ago to make room for the new house.

  • Country singer Miranda Lambert has a popular song out now, “The House that Built Me,” about a woman who goes back to the home of her childhood to vicariously relive the precious memories that she formed there.

    In a way, local home restorer Eddie Black is doing the same thing as he repairs and preserves a historic home on Greensburg Street in Hodgenville, a house that, like Lambert, “built him.”

  • Sierra Enlow, a LaRue County High School graduate, has been named Kentucky Cherry Blossom Princess.

    She was selected to represent the Kentucky Society of Washington D.C. and will be representing the state at the Cherry Blossom Festival April 3-9 in Washington D.C.

    Each princess is selected by her state society, territory or country to be cultural ambassadors for the National Conference of State Societies for a one-year reign.

  • Sorrow touched the hearts of many in Shelby County last week with the loss of a man who was well-known not only as a local businessman for half a century but also for his generosity and love for his community.

    Joseph E. Burks, 89, was the husband of 66 years of Mary Anderson Burks, and father to Joseph E. II, Carl David, Mark Athel, John Jay Crittenden (deceased) and Paul Morgan Burks and Bonnie Burks Gray. He owned the John Deere dealership in LaRue County many years ago.

  • BY ERIN L. MCCOY

    The crowd was fixated on two L-shaped rods gripped in the woman's hands just as they started to turn.

    "Cross the rods, Antoine," Michael Wilhite asked again.

    The rods turned toward each other, but the woman's hands weren't moving. Whoever - or whatever - moved the rods was invisible to everyone present.

  •  After a year that saw an 18 percent drop in admissions, the Stephen Foster Drama Association is retooling for next summer with the aid of local governments.

    Nelson County Fiscal Court voted Nov. 16 to give $30,000 to the non- profit theater company and the Bardstown City Council decided Dec. 28 to pitch in $12,500. It marks the first time the municipalities have given money directly to the arts organization.

    The association’s managing artistic director Johnny Warren said the extra funds will be used to replenish a depleted marketing budget.

  • When Tim Shockley was minister of music and youth at Buffalo Baptist Church during the early 1990s, he enjoyed and appreciated his musical calling, but also felt a passion of a different type, another calling which led him to become associated with Hospice (now Hosparus).

  • In 1905, Las Vegas was established when a railroad company auctioned 110 acres of land. The Wright brothers succeeded in keeping their third aeroplane in the air for 30 minutes. Tsar Nicholas II begrudgingly granted Russia's first constitution. And in New Hope, John Davis, the town's blacksmith, and his wife, Elizabeth Brady Davis, welcomed a baby girl, Mary Stella.

    On Dec. 7, Mary Stella Boone celebrated her 105th birthday with a steady stream of friends and family.

  • Jim Evans has had many unusual calls for help during his 25 years as LaRue County dog warden.

    “I’ve had calls for me to come and get possums, coons, and horses,” said Evans, who is retiring at the end of the year. “I’ve even had a call for me to catch a skunk and a three-foot lizard.”

    As dog warden, his actual responsibility was to pick up only the canines, so he would usually refer the callers to the appropriate people who could capture the other animals. He has had his hands full, sometimes literally, with dogs.

  • Local funeral home operators Brad Turner and Todd Skaggs are offering a 3,500 square-foot home in Hodgenville for the taking.

    The only stipulation is that the person who takes the home must pay an earnest deposit and agree to pay for moving the historic Victorian-style house off the property located next to Bennett-Bertram Funeral Home on Water Street.

  • The sign above Gatlin Constant’s display in the foyer at Hodgenville’s IGA on Saturday mornings says a lot about the 11-year-old: “Help Me to Help Others.”

    For almost seven years, the lad has dedicated himself to giving to those in need.

    “He has the biggest heart of any kid I’ve ever met,” said Renee Wright, one of his fifth grade teachers at Hodgenville Elementary School.

  • LaRue County Chamber of Commerce members expressed mixed emotions last Wednesday as they bid farewell to Executive Director Rita Williams.

    Williams is stepping down from the executive director position after about five years of service. In October, Williams took a leave of absence as she campaigned for the seat of Mayor of Hodgenville. When she lost the race, she decided to step away from chamber of commerce duties.  

    Friends, past presidents and other chamber leadership filled the Lincoln Museum Community Room to show appreciation for Williams.

  • Valerie Viers returned to her hometown of Hodgenville from a two-year Peace Corps stint in Jordan with the realization that though Arab culture and customs are quite different from those of Americans, people are basically the same everywhere.

    “The kids love to play the same games as our children, for example tag, and their version of duck-duck-goose,” said Viers, who served as an English teacher at a girls’ school there. “They watch American shows like Hannah Montana, Tom and Jerry and Sponge Bob Square Pants.