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Features

  •  How does it feel to be 100?

  •  December 2011 marked another milestone in American history as the last U.S. combat troops withdrew from Iraq, ending nine years of fighting that saw over 4,000 American fatalities.

  • Vanessa McFarland is thankful to be alive, and in her opinion, it is because of the free services offered to her through the Community Health Clinic of Hardin and LaRue Counties.
    McFarland, who is battling ailments including type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol and thyroid issues, began going to the clinic about six years ago.
    With no health insurance, little income and the need for treatment of her chronic conditions, a friend recommended she schedule an appointment at the community clinic.

  • It’s often said that firefighters belong to a certain “brotherhood.” They work together for a common cause, share cookouts, family functions, business ventures and many other day-to-day activities.
    However, LaRue County/Hodgenville Fire Departments go a step further into the commonalities shared by these individuals.
    Of about 30-35 firefighters who make up the departments’ rosters, 14 of those men and women share the experience with their spouse and even more share it with their families.

  • During this Christmas season when gifts are on the mind of most people, Kelly Clark is thankful that she has received a special present that is free and yet priceless – the gift of life.

    “The doctor told me that I should be dead, that I should have bled out,” Clark, 29, said, remembering a car accident on an icy LaRue County road Feb. 21, 2009, that left her with a severed carotid artery, multiple facial fractures, a broken collarbone, fractured shoulder blade and bleeding on her brain.

  • Although the U.S. Navy didn’t lift the ban on women serving on submarines until 2010, Helen Carroll, a resident at Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Hodgenville, rode a sub through the Panama Canal in 1951.

  • While Jerry Williams and Ken Baldwin were putting the finishing touches to their Christmas CD, “Strings and Bows,” last year at Williams’ home on North Lincoln Boulevard in Hodgenville, the two planted a seed idea for another album of a completely different nature.
    “I’m a Civil War buff and, since the War occurred 150 years ago, I thought that putting together a mixture of traditional and original songs with a flavor of the period would be a timely project,” said Williams.

  • Although Magnolia resident Tickle Ragland and Sharon Meisenheimer, who lives in Walnut, Ill., have exchanged letters for 65 years, neither pen pal knew until recently that Sharon’s husband Lester has relatives buried in LaRue County.
    “We knew Lester’s grandparents came from Hodgenville and moved to Illinois where they were buried, but we didn’t know where the rest of his family was buried,” Sharon said.  

  • The need for blood is constant. In fact every two seconds someone in the U.S. is in need.
    That’s why on the second Tuesday of every other month, downtown Hodgenville is lined with signs urging people to donate blood at the Hodgenville Woman’s Club.
    “It’s a simple, but life saving process,” said Volunteer Coordinator Faye Puyear “The actual giving blood part only takes eight to 10 minutes.”

  • Story courtesy of The Greensburg Record Herald

  • Jim Routt of Sonora worked construction for 35 years. When he retired at 65, he stopped building frames and began building fires for barbecue.

    Along with his barbecue business, Bucksnort Barbeque, he also volunteers with Carpenters for Christ.

    Routt, 68, has lived in Hardin County most of his life. He lived outside the county for 10 years when he served in the U.S. Navy and worked for a telephone company in Florida. In 1969, he moved back to Hardin County and started to work in the construction business.

  • Since the day she entered her first clogging class in 1990, dancing has been a way of providing, fun, fitness and fellowship for Bonita Pendleton.
    In the past three years, however, even her passion for clogging and the stress relief that was its partner have lost their luster as Pendleton has experienced the death of her husband and her two daughters.
    “I’m just trying to sort out my life right now,” she said. “I’m trying to put it all back together.”

  • On the day this summer that Jimmy Hornback and William Hutcherson received commissions as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army they found out that their grandfathers had also entered the service together in January 1945.
    Haynes Allen, Hornback’s grandfather, and Eugene Hutcherson, William’s grandparent, mustered in Hodgenville with 19 other inductees to leave for basic training in the waning months of World War II.

  • Hodgenville native Henry Miller may very well be the number one University of Kentucky basketball fan in the world. He lives, breathes and claims to bleed the color blue.
    According to Miller the idea to begin collecting U.K. things stemmed from his late mother. His mother told him one day in 1986 that he should begin a Wildcat room.

  • Ever since Shari Mabe watched and heard LaRue County’s Grimes family “jamming” to Bluegrass and gospel music at their house in 1998, she has had a desire to learn to play the acoustic guitar.
    Judging from the noted musicians she has been keeping company with lately, the Dangerfield Road resident has learned to pick that six-stringed instrument very well, thank you.

  • When former district judge James Bondurant was a young man, he had two main goals: to marry the prettiest girl on earth and to become a country lawyer.
    That mission has been accomplished on both counts, according to the 81-year-old judge who has spent most of his life as a LaRue County resident. He found the prettiest girl in the former Kaye Keyes of Lexington, whom he married in 1952.  And, before becoming a judge, he practiced law in Hardin and LaRue counties, fulfilling his second goal.

  • Sunrise Manor Nursing Home, now a Signature-managed healthcare facility, has set a new record for the facility.
    Last week, during a two-day period, three residents were discharged to home. None of the current staff can recall that many people, in such a short timeframe, returning home from the long-term care facility in its 44-year history.
    “I think a lot of people have the misconception that if they come into the nursing home, they won’t leave,” said Mark Burba, staff physical therapist. “That’s not necessarily true.”

  • After the stories are written, ads placed, paper printed and circulars inserted, The LaRue County Herald News makes its way to the newsstands. However, its journey getting there deserves a story itself.

  • Carl Howell, Hodgen­ville attorney, author, authority on Abraham Lincoln and vintage postcard collector, has added several local school yearbooks, some more than 100 years old, to his collection of LaRue County history.
    The books, which include annuals of two of the three colleges that once flourished in the county as well as high schools, provide not only a record of the students who attended long ago, but also insight into LaRue County’s educational and social status of a century ago.

  • In addition to a collection of vintage college annuals, Hodgenville attorney and historian Carl Howell also has several old yearbooks from Hodgenville High School, with one, published in 1917, claiming to be the first.
    That 1916-17 annual waxed poetic throughout. Its preface gives some idea of the post-Victorian verbiage inside: “This is an invitation to come and drink at the fountain of pure information concerning our school. This, the first annual, is bubbling over with everything pertaining to school life.”