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Features

  •  As an all-star cheerleader for eight years, Sydney Dobson applied to the University of Kentucky because it was her dream to make the nation’s best cheerleading team. It was the only school she applied to.

    Dobson, a 2011 LaRue County High school graduate, didn’t make the team, but that’s where her perseverance and attitude took over. One of her first moves was to join the Student Activities Board. It was also through SAB that the next chapter of her story unfolded.

  •  Lisa Shaheen, a resident of Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Hodgenville, received the 2014 International Eden Elder Award at the organization’s meeting in Nashville May 2.

    Sally Rineker, Sunrise Manor’s quality of life director, said the whole philosophy of Eden Alternative is to create a life worth living.  

    “We want to get away from the institutional model of a nursing home and eliminate its three plagues – helplessness, loneliness and boredom. In their place is a model where residents are active in various pursuits.”

  •  After having several top-10 country songs in the 1960s and ’70s, Hodgenville native Bobby Lewis has resurged to the top of the individual country artist (IndieWorld) charts with “Shutters and Boards.”

    “I want to say how much it means to me, all the contacts, phone calls from DJ’s and friends wishing me the best and helping me celebrate my first Number One record,” Lewis said from his home in Hermitage, Tennessee. “Many of my stablemates on Pretty World Records sent me a message of how happy they were for me.”

  •  About 150 veterans on bicycles, handcycles and recumbents rode through Hodgenville Wednesday morning.

    The group, part of the UnitedHealthcare Ride 2 Recovery Bluegrass Challenge, was met by LaRue County deputies at the LaRue/Hardin line and escorted to the Hart County line. Hodgenville officers escorted them through the city.

    Several residents stood at the side of the road, waving and encouraging the cyclists. Debora Spano, spokeswoman for Ride 2 Recovery, said the community support is “phenomenal.”

  • Saturday was prom for LaRue County High School students. Cindy Smith of Cut Above styled Maddie Royalty’s hair for the occasion.

  •  Though Dr. Charles Hazle’s career field has taken him to three continents, his starting point was on another kind of field right here in LaRue County — the Hawks’ football field.

  •   Betty Crawford credits two things for saving her life when her kidneys were failing and her diseased liver had swollen to weigh 30 pounds: God and a person she never had the opportunity to meet.

  •  Having performed at the Kennedy Center and White House, Hodgenville resident Gordon Thomas planned to do some sightseeing in New York when he had the opportunity to sing in Carnegie Hall.

  •  The Blue Soul Gypsys (spelling is correct) will perform at The Historic State Theater on March 15.

  • Two weeks before Christmas, Gordon Bright received a present that was 48 years in arriving – medals he had earned for service in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War.
    “I got to thinking what medals I might be eligible to receive after I had talked to several guys that I served with,” said Bright, a 68-year-old LaRue County native who entered service in 1966.  
    “I served for three years, eight months, and seven days,” he recalled from his home off Highway 357 about five miles from Hodgenville.  

  •  A home which still stands on West Main Street in Lexington was the family home of Mary Todd Lincoln from 1832 to 1839.

  •  Why was the Lincoln-Douglas debate scene included in the Lincoln Museum?

  •  Twenty-six years ago, a group of volunteers in the hometown of Abraham Lincoln became determined to turn an old department store into a showplace for the 16th President.

  •  The 205th birthday of native son Abraham Lincoln was celebrated with the annual Lincoln Days luncheon.

  •  We asked our readers to share their love stories ­– or those of their loved ones – with us. Three women took the challenge. Many thanks to Diane Skaggs Osborne, Reba Skaggs Duell and Rosanna Williams.

     

    He got what he prayed for

    The first time my Dad, J.D. Skaggs, took my mom, Rachel Sidebottom, on a date, he came home and prayed all night to his sweet Lord for her to be his wife.  

    He said he loved her from the very beginning.

  • Words spoken at a memorial service for Ashley Long Jan. 31 at LaRue County Middle School assured the relatives, students, and school staff that though gone, she will not be forgotten.
    Eleven-year-old Long, a sixth-grade student, lost her four-year battle with leukemia Jan. 8. As a celebration of her life, the student body filed into the school’s gymnasium to hear teachers and Long’s classmate and friend, Sydney Pepper, speak briefly about the positive influence the daughter of Todd and Linda Long had on all those around her.

  • The Freemasons are one of the world’s most secretive groups.
    Their initiation rituals, mystery handshakes and archaic symbols, dating from medieval times, have become the source of many myths, conspiracy theories and outrageous claims. Blockbuster Hollywood films and novels, along with information and misinformation on the Internet, have led to suppositions that Freemasons faked the moon landing, sank the Titanic, assassinated President Lincoln and plan to take over the world.

  • You don’t need a special reason to give blood. You just need your own reason.  

  • 2013 was a boisterous year for LaRue County.