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Features

  •  We asked our readers to share their love stories ­– or those of their loved ones – with us. Three women took the challenge. Many thanks to Diane Skaggs Osborne, Reba Skaggs Duell and Rosanna Williams.

     

    He got what he prayed for

    The first time my Dad, J.D. Skaggs, took my mom, Rachel Sidebottom, on a date, he came home and prayed all night to his sweet Lord for her to be his wife.  

    He said he loved her from the very beginning.

  • Words spoken at a memorial service for Ashley Long Jan. 31 at LaRue County Middle School assured the relatives, students, and school staff that though gone, she will not be forgotten.
    Eleven-year-old Long, a sixth-grade student, lost her four-year battle with leukemia Jan. 8. As a celebration of her life, the student body filed into the school’s gymnasium to hear teachers and Long’s classmate and friend, Sydney Pepper, speak briefly about the positive influence the daughter of Todd and Linda Long had on all those around her.

  • The Freemasons are one of the world’s most secretive groups.
    Their initiation rituals, mystery handshakes and archaic symbols, dating from medieval times, have become the source of many myths, conspiracy theories and outrageous claims. Blockbuster Hollywood films and novels, along with information and misinformation on the Internet, have led to suppositions that Freemasons faked the moon landing, sank the Titanic, assassinated President Lincoln and plan to take over the world.

  • You don’t need a special reason to give blood. You just need your own reason.  

  • 2013 was a boisterous year for LaRue County.

  • Lisa Shaheen is becoming known among fellow residents at Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Hodgenville as a rising, talented artist.

  • In partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and the American Association of Diabetes Educators, Flaget Memorial Hospital, part of KentuckyOne Health, will host a free pre-diabetes education program beginning Jan. 14.

  • A Navy veteran and avid outdoorsman, Campbellsville resident Rob Harris says there isn’t much he’s afraid of – unless there’s a snake around, and that’s when Harris says it’s time to go.

  • W.D. Burden knew something was wrong two years ago when he started feeling exhausted and sluggish for no particular reason.

  •  The Alzheimer’s Association estimates 5.2 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer’s disease – a type of dementia that causes problems with memory, thinking and behavior. 

  • Sarah Hornback said her husband has forgotten more calculus than most people ever learn.

    The grim joke describes how the Hodgenville residents realized Paul Hornback had early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.

    Paul suffered a mini stroke in 2007.

    He told doctors as they tried to determine why the mini stroke had occurred he had been having trouble remembering names and other details.

  •  Since the late 1950s, a small building in a remote area of LaRue County has played a role in keeping millions of people safe.

  • As a mother of three daughters and a teacher at Magnolia Elementary, in December 1999 life was going fairly well for this LaRue County lady.

    My oldest daughter had recently married, my other two daughters were successfully midway through their senior and sophomore high school years, and I recently had begun dating a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel. My class was moving along at the expected pace and the Christmas Crazies had not really hit the classroom just yet.

  • That’s right. You saw what you saw.

    Today’s edition of The LaRue County Herald News is printed on pink paper.

    We hope to make a point with the pink paper about Breast Cancer Awareness Month. It is a terrible disease that thousands of people suffer from in this country. Chances are, every reader of this issue has been touched by the disease in some way, whether they or a family member suffer from it, or they know someone who has.

    Inside are stories about breast cancer — who can get it and how steps you can take to reduce your risk.

  • Breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women, second only to lung cancer. One in eight women is expected to develop breast cancer in her lifetime, and a recent survey by the Society for Women’s Health Research found that 22 percent of women named breast cancer as the disease they fear most. The specter of breast cancer makes it no surprise that women are eager to seek various ways to reduce their risks of developing this potentially deadly disease.

  • At the age of 12 to 15, many young women are experiencing the body and life changes that accompany adolescence. It can be difficult to imagine that breasts that are just beginning to develop may contain cancer. But such is the reality for some girls.

  • Last week’s story about the Maxine store contained an inaccuracy.

    Kathy Ross, a granddaughter of Albert Hazle, who built the store, provided the correct information.

    Albert Hazle was born in 1901.

    He and his wife Ora opened the store in the early 1920s. It was located about a quarter mile from the Ky. 357 and 1517 crossroads.

    Ross’ father, Charles “Red” Hazle, was born in Maxine.

  • Tucked away near Tucker Creek lies Tucker Cemetery.

    Established in the 1850s, the cemetery is located on the west side of highway 357 between Maxine and Tanner; however, it is no longer visible from the road due to surrounding foliage.

    The cemetery, although unknown to passers by, contains the graves of a one-time prominent family of LaRue County – the Tuckers.

    Anderson Tucker and Nancy Hawkins Tucker married in 1820 in Stokes County, N.C., before making the trek to Kentucky in 1842.