.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  •  Two LaRue County teens will compete Saturday in the Distinguished Young Women of Kentucky contest – formerly called Junior Miss.

    Emillee Cundiff or Montana Metcalf –both seniors – will represent the county in the state contest in January.

    A third contestant, Cayleigh Allen, decided against competing after she won the Miss LaRue County Fair pageant, according to LaRue County DYW coordinator Denise Skaggs.

  •  About 50 years ago, Grant Wise was hired at his first job.

    He was only 11, but he handled duties that would make some grownups cry in protest.

    Up at 3 a.m., seven days a week, he pedaled his bicycle, while hefting a heavy canvas bag, for miles through the dark streets of Hodgenville – no matter the weather. He retraced his route in the afternoon.

    He was a newspaper boy.

  • A few years ago, Bobby Morrison picked out an embroidered panel for his own casket.
    His family did not know what he had done – but after they saw it last week at the funeral home, they agreed the design fit him perfectly.
    Morrison, who died June 8 at the age of 88, had selected depictions of Santa Claus, a fire department and Ferris wheel. The words “Scout Master Troop 425” underscored the colorful motifs.

  • Addilyn “Addie” Roberts, the 3-year-old daughter of Angela and Ben Roberts of Hodgenville, started her final phase of chemotherapy last Monday.
    The little girl with the big smile was diagnosed with leukemia at age 2 and has been on treatment since then.
    “She’s been doing pretty well. She had a really rough month in February, though,” said Angela, who added her daughter lost 13 pounds in two weeks due to nausea caused by the chemo.
    “But she got through it and she’s doing really well,” she said.

  •  Starting June 4, the LaRue County Cooperative Extension Service and LaRue County Health Department will sponsor a 10-week weight loss program on Wednesdays.

    The program will be from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. at the LaRue County Senior Center. It ends Aug. 6.

    Theresa Howard, family and consumer services agent at the Extension office, and Diana Leathers, community health educator, said the classes are open to all ages.

  •  Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan—

    Daniel E. “Dan” London has been deployed for about two years in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, but still maintains a close connection to his home area of Hardin County. That connection was shown May 24 when he let about 30 co-workers pour very cold water over him in support of a local charity in memory of Addison Jo Blair who was lost to cancer at a very young age.

  •  There’s a new business in town. In fact, you may have seen it driving around Hodgenville, recently—it’s pretty hard to miss.

    Jill Rock is the proud owner of the Clippin’ Waggin’, which, she believes, is Hodgenville’s only mobile pet grooming service. 

    Her business is set up in a white van with bright, multi-colored bubbles painted on the sides and pictures of her dog, Jack, sitting in a tub on wheels, and Winky, her mother, Rosalie Jahnke’s dog on the back. 

  •  As an all-star cheerleader for eight years, Sydney Dobson applied to the University of Kentucky because it was her dream to make the nation’s best cheerleading team. It was the only school she applied to.

    Dobson, a 2011 LaRue County High school graduate, didn’t make the team, but that’s where her perseverance and attitude took over. One of her first moves was to join the Student Activities Board. It was also through SAB that the next chapter of her story unfolded.

  •  Lisa Shaheen, a resident of Sunrise Manor Nursing Home in Hodgenville, received the 2014 International Eden Elder Award at the organization’s meeting in Nashville May 2.

    Sally Rineker, Sunrise Manor’s quality of life director, said the whole philosophy of Eden Alternative is to create a life worth living.  

    “We want to get away from the institutional model of a nursing home and eliminate its three plagues – helplessness, loneliness and boredom. In their place is a model where residents are active in various pursuits.”

  •  After having several top-10 country songs in the 1960s and ’70s, Hodgenville native Bobby Lewis has resurged to the top of the individual country artist (IndieWorld) charts with “Shutters and Boards.”

    “I want to say how much it means to me, all the contacts, phone calls from DJ’s and friends wishing me the best and helping me celebrate my first Number One record,” Lewis said from his home in Hermitage, Tennessee. “Many of my stablemates on Pretty World Records sent me a message of how happy they were for me.”

  •  About 150 veterans on bicycles, handcycles and recumbents rode through Hodgenville Wednesday morning.

    The group, part of the UnitedHealthcare Ride 2 Recovery Bluegrass Challenge, was met by LaRue County deputies at the LaRue/Hardin line and escorted to the Hart County line. Hodgenville officers escorted them through the city.

    Several residents stood at the side of the road, waving and encouraging the cyclists. Debora Spano, spokeswoman for Ride 2 Recovery, said the community support is “phenomenal.”

  • Saturday was prom for LaRue County High School students. Cindy Smith of Cut Above styled Maddie Royalty’s hair for the occasion.

  •  Though Dr. Charles Hazle’s career field has taken him to three continents, his starting point was on another kind of field right here in LaRue County — the Hawks’ football field.

  •   Betty Crawford credits two things for saving her life when her kidneys were failing and her diseased liver had swollen to weigh 30 pounds: God and a person she never had the opportunity to meet.

  •  Having performed at the Kennedy Center and White House, Hodgenville resident Gordon Thomas planned to do some sightseeing in New York when he had the opportunity to sing in Carnegie Hall.

  •  The Blue Soul Gypsys (spelling is correct) will perform at The Historic State Theater on March 15.

  • Two weeks before Christmas, Gordon Bright received a present that was 48 years in arriving – medals he had earned for service in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War.
    “I got to thinking what medals I might be eligible to receive after I had talked to several guys that I served with,” said Bright, a 68-year-old LaRue County native who entered service in 1966.  
    “I served for three years, eight months, and seven days,” he recalled from his home off Highway 357 about five miles from Hodgenville.  

  •  A home which still stands on West Main Street in Lexington was the family home of Mary Todd Lincoln from 1832 to 1839.

  •  Why was the Lincoln-Douglas debate scene included in the Lincoln Museum?

  •  Twenty-six years ago, a group of volunteers in the hometown of Abraham Lincoln became determined to turn an old department store into a showplace for the 16th President.