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Features

  • This time my trip in my vehicle was short. It lasted the whole of three minutes. I walked out of the office and drove less than half a mile to the LaRue County Courthouse where I got lost in the year 1853. You read that correctly.

    I’ve been looking, off and on, for information about the county poor house farm for about three or four months. There were supposedly two in LaRue County, I was looking for the one that was located between White City and Howardstown somewhere along Plouvier Road.

  • For some reason when I’m not sure where I want to go I often find myself headed south on 31E. I’m really not sure exactly why, I can only guess that part of it is that I’m intrigued by early “interstate” highways like 31E. My fascination was soon diverted when I came upon a road I’m pretty sure I haven’t been on, Charlie Ragland Road.

  • I  had to take a detour to work one day; sure I could have taken several shorter routes, but that’s just not my style. I called the office and told Hazel I was taking this opportunity to get lost. And lost is exactly what happened.

  • It has been over a year of Lost in LaRue. What started as a conversation of “getting to know” each other at the office, when I was new at this job and pretty much new to LaRue County, turned into one of my favorite parts of this job. When I was talking about what I like to do, one of the many things was to take road trips. Not the long distance kind but the little backroads that really give the feeling of what a town, area or county are all about, especially if they aren’t paved; I mentioned that I like to get lost in the back roads and Lost in LaRue was born.

  • An eighth of a tank of gas is probably not enough for a back roads morning adventure, but I did it anyway. I was on my way to work and the sun was shining on the trees that are just about to change colors, mist was rising out of the hills and it just seemed like the perfect morning to take some photos. I was on 31E headed toward Hodgenville and turned onto Hwy 470 headed toward a spot where I knew I could get some great shots.

  • Y

    ou ever get a case of the “Mondays” that starts on Sunday night? If you don’t know, the Mondays are that blue feeling that happens when reality sets in that the weekend is over. It usually happens when you’ve had an awesome weekend that you don’t want to end.

  • Haven’t been out and about on a road trip in a while. I’ll be honest friends, it’s killing me. We did go on a road trip on the way to Gatlinburg recently. We avoided all the major highways and drove through all the little towns on our way through eastern Kentucky and Tennessee; it was wonderful. But on the way back, needing to get home quickly and prepare for the coming week of school and work, we rushed along the interstate with hundreds of other hurried travelers like ants dutifully marching toward their task.

  • I was out taking photos again for Discover LaRue. It was a cloudy day and the wind was whipping across LaRue County looking for an unprepared reporter to turn into an icicle; I forgot my jacket that morning. It was one of those famous Kentucky mornings that start out deceivingly warm and then the temperature begins to drop.

  • I was headed south on New Jackson Highway for a last minute interview with a fabric shop. I love fabric, so I was already pretty happy about the opportunity. The sun was shining and everything was showing that glorious fresh green of early spring. A purple field caught my attention so I turned around and parked my car to take some photos. I think the weed in the field is called henbit. I’m sure it is some kind of nuisance, but it was absolutely stunning against the bright blue sky. I snapped some pictures and headed on to my destination.

  • LaRue County Black History Citizen of the Year Reverend Kenny Carter

    After a year absence, I was excited to continue the LaRue County Black History Citizen of the Year. The recipient this year was Reverend Kenny Carter, Sr.

  • Some road trips are planned out or at least I have a particular destination in mind, but occasionally a road trip transpires out of sheer happenstance. This particular trip was the latter.

  • A strong love for God and for each other has been the bedrock foundation of a marriage of almost 58 years between Reverend Gordon McDowell and his wife Wilma.

    “If God is not in the middle, you don’t have anything to hold a marriage together,” said McDowell from his home on B. F. Brown Road near Buffalo. “Marriage is not a 50-50 proposition; it’s really a 100-100 partnership if it’s going to last.”

    That union began when he was 18-years-old and she was 17-years-old on June 11, 1958.

  • As crazy as it may seem, I have never been to Sonora. I have been near Sonora, I’ve passed it while travelling I-65 but I have never actually driven through the town of Sonora. So on this particular trip I took Hwy 84 to Sonora. I stopped to get some gas and drove around downtown Sonora. It’s a neat little town with old buildings that represent old Americana when the small farming community was the bustling center of the average American’s life.

  • Sometimes you just have a hunch; you can’t explain it but something tells you to veer from your normal path and see what lies ahead in the other direction. One such hunch came over me last week on my way to work. I was running late and was just going to take the quickest route to Hodgenville from home, Hwy 31E. But something was telling me to turn off on Salem Church Road. Maybe it was my lack of acceptance that it was indeed production day after a long weekend with Monday off, but I followed my instincts and took the long way to work.

  • While out in the Buffalo neighborhood, I decided to try my luck taking Hwy 470 toward Magnolia again. Last time I traveled that particular highway I found myself, and my truck, knee deep in mud near a pond I was trying to take pictures of.

    I arrived in Magnolia and turned off on Mt. Sherman Road and drove for a bit then decided to see what was down LG & E Road.

  • By Ron Sanders

    Guest Columnist

  • A book was recently released to the public about the history of LaRue County during the American Civil War.

    Local author Steven L Wright wrote his book “A History of LaRue County, KY in the Civil War” about the actual events that occurred in and around LaRue County during the Civil War and how they affected the residents of LaRue County. The book features several chapters specific to LaRue County including Camp Wickliffe, guerrilla raids, murder of Union soldier Thomas Franklin Crady, the burning of the LaRue County Courthouse and much more.

  • LaRue County attorney, noted Lincoln scholar and historian, and vintage postcard collector Carl Howell in his latest book, Kentucky in the early 1900s: A Postcard Tribute, has produced a full-color 200-page volume that offers readers a written and pictorial look at Kentucky as it was over 100 years ago.