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Features

  •  (StatePoint) Forget cronuts, cake pops and cupcakes. Whether you’re planning an elegant afternoon tea or seeking an unexpected addition to your next brunch or cocktail party, there’s another chic pastry that deserves its day – the madeleine. These classic seashell-shaped cakes were named after their creator, Madeline Paulmier, by King Louis XV in the 18th century, so the story goes.

  •  A Hodgenville woman, known for a lifetime of service to others, celebrated her 90th birthday Saturday.

    Patricia Laha Greer has been a caregiver for several family members – and at Sunrise Manor Nursing Home for 18 years. She is the surviving child of William Miles and Sallie Laha, the founder of Laha’s Red Castle.

    “Pat” was born in Henry County, Illinois, in 1925. She had seven brothers – one of whom died in infancy.

  • Considering that the chances of being identical twins are three in a thousand, the fact that identical twins Wilma Bradshaw and Ilma Whittaker will celebrate their 90th birthdays March 1 is even more astounding.

    “We were born on our grandparents’ (Kenneth and Genora Miller’s) farm March 1, 1925,” said Wilma. “Dr. (Leigh) Maupin came out in a horse and buggy to deliver us and stayed all day.”

    Parents Harry and Alpha Gardner celebrated having the family’s first set of twins on that cold winter Sunday. 

  • Aaron McDowell and his band, Blue Soul Gypsys, are set to perform at the Historic State Theater in Elizabethtown at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 21. McDowell, a native of Buffalo, said he’s excited to return to the area to perform.

    “It means everything [to return],” he said. “I don’t care if there are five people there. There’s nothing like people – they know they’re a part of it. I’ve been to (Los Angeles) and back playing music. But there’s nothing like doing it here.”

  •  If someone told Elizabeth and Earl Sanders that their 65-year marriage was made in heaven, he would get no argument from either one of them.

    “I believe that God has a plan for everyone, and that he is in control,” said Elizabeth. “God meant for me to marry Earl, although I didn’t know it when we first met.”

    In fact, marriage was the last thing on her mind when she met her future husband.

  • Bob Jennings doesn’t believe in rushing into things.

    He credits that tendency against making hasty decisions as a key reason for his marriage to his childhood sweetheart, the former Nadine Riddle, lasting more than 65 years.

    “Too many people meet each other and get married right away without really knowing each other,” Bob, 84, declared. “Nadine and I dated for two years, and during that time, we got to know not only each other, but each other’s family as well as that also is very important.”

  • When you think of Christmas movies, one that may leap to mind is National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation and lovable father figure Clark Griswold, who wishes his family to have the perfect holiday. One particularly funny subplot of the film is Clark’s desire to have impressive Christmas lights, but his inability to get them to work. When Clark’s house finally lights up, it blinds his neighbors and causes a power outage.

  • Entering foster care is widely considered one of the most difficult things a child can go through. Oftentimes, children in foster care have been taken from their birth family for reasons such as abuse, drug use, mental illness or crime.

    One family in Sonora is trying to turn some of those negatives into positives.

  • Think of bucket lists and you expect to see names of exotic islands or as-yet-unachieved goals.

    The item at the top of Charles Slayton’s list, however, is neither a place nor an accomplishment. Instead, it is to fulfill the wish of his late father in finding a long-lost World War II German officer’s Luger.

    His dad, Wilburn “Web” Slayton, grew up in the Magnolia area of LaRue County.

  • Walking toward a nearly dried up Prather Creek in Loretto, Theresa Hartley reminisces about her childhood home, which used to sit feet away from the creek on Spencer Hamilton Road.
    A cement slab sits on the ground where her family’s garage once stood.
    She can still remember where their dog pen was located on the property. Aside from that, there’s little proof that a home once stood there.

  • Some people would undoubtedly call him crazy.

    Jerry Cooper, known to some as “The Hornet Man,” has made a habit of something that scares most people: collecting hornet nests and, often enough, the hornets that are inside.

    Cooper works as a custodian for LaRue County Schools. But when the call comes that someone needs a nest removed, he leaps into action.

  • When you walk into a printing plant, it can be sort of assaulting. It’s constant noise. Machines banging into one another, papers flying from one sorter to the next and, of course, the press itself, stamping newspapers from all over the state and sending them to the next stop on their journey.

  •  Two LaRue County teens will compete Saturday in the Distinguished Young Women of Kentucky contest – formerly called Junior Miss.

    Emillee Cundiff or Montana Metcalf –both seniors – will represent the county in the state contest in January.

    A third contestant, Cayleigh Allen, decided against competing after she won the Miss LaRue County Fair pageant, according to LaRue County DYW coordinator Denise Skaggs.

  •  About 50 years ago, Grant Wise was hired at his first job.

    He was only 11, but he handled duties that would make some grownups cry in protest.

    Up at 3 a.m., seven days a week, he pedaled his bicycle, while hefting a heavy canvas bag, for miles through the dark streets of Hodgenville – no matter the weather. He retraced his route in the afternoon.

    He was a newspaper boy.

  • A few years ago, Bobby Morrison picked out an embroidered panel for his own casket.
    His family did not know what he had done – but after they saw it last week at the funeral home, they agreed the design fit him perfectly.
    Morrison, who died June 8 at the age of 88, had selected depictions of Santa Claus, a fire department and Ferris wheel. The words “Scout Master Troop 425” underscored the colorful motifs.

  • Addilyn “Addie” Roberts, the 3-year-old daughter of Angela and Ben Roberts of Hodgenville, started her final phase of chemotherapy last Monday.
    The little girl with the big smile was diagnosed with leukemia at age 2 and has been on treatment since then.
    “She’s been doing pretty well. She had a really rough month in February, though,” said Angela, who added her daughter lost 13 pounds in two weeks due to nausea caused by the chemo.
    “But she got through it and she’s doing really well,” she said.

  •  Starting June 4, the LaRue County Cooperative Extension Service and LaRue County Health Department will sponsor a 10-week weight loss program on Wednesdays.

    The program will be from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. at the LaRue County Senior Center. It ends Aug. 6.

    Theresa Howard, family and consumer services agent at the Extension office, and Diana Leathers, community health educator, said the classes are open to all ages.

  •  Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan—

    Daniel E. “Dan” London has been deployed for about two years in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, but still maintains a close connection to his home area of Hardin County. That connection was shown May 24 when he let about 30 co-workers pour very cold water over him in support of a local charity in memory of Addison Jo Blair who was lost to cancer at a very young age.

  •  There’s a new business in town. In fact, you may have seen it driving around Hodgenville, recently—it’s pretty hard to miss.

    Jill Rock is the proud owner of the Clippin’ Waggin’, which, she believes, is Hodgenville’s only mobile pet grooming service. 

    Her business is set up in a white van with bright, multi-colored bubbles painted on the sides and pictures of her dog, Jack, sitting in a tub on wheels, and Winky, her mother, Rosalie Jahnke’s dog on the back. 

  •  As an all-star cheerleader for eight years, Sydney Dobson applied to the University of Kentucky because it was her dream to make the nation’s best cheerleading team. It was the only school she applied to.

    Dobson, a 2011 LaRue County High school graduate, didn’t make the team, but that’s where her perseverance and attitude took over. One of her first moves was to join the Student Activities Board. It was also through SAB that the next chapter of her story unfolded.