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Today's Opinions

  • COLUMN: BAVEL is Kentucky's best kept educational secret

    One of Kentucky's best-kept secrets is the Barren Academy of Virtual and Expanded Learning.

    While the commonwealth loses 10,000 students from each graduating class, only 110 students currently are enrolled in the academy. Nevertheless, BAVEL offers the right kind of alternative to tip the scales in the other direction.

    Not only does it offer all Kentucky students - regardless of where they live - the opportunity to acquire a high school diploma while every single class online, but it's getting top-quality results at very low costs.

  • COLUMN: Let nonviolence begin with me

    In recent days the Catholic community celebrated the feast of St Peter Claver.  

  • COLUMN: Pecking order out of whack after top hen's demise

    For those of you who do not care about chickens, much less my pet chickens – this is the time to stop reading. Fair warning.
    There have been a couple of people in recent weeks, however, who have asked about the Ireland hendom so I offer an update.
    Things have been a bit wild in the chicken lot since we lost one of my favorite hens – “Red” – a couple of months ago.
    It was not a traumatic end – as was the case with our rooster Russell Crow who lost his head to a passing possum. She simply molted, stayed sickly and died.

  • LETTER: Telecommuncation options available to low-income families

    The continual innovation in the telecommunications industry creates numerous new telecommunications options from which Kentucky consumers can choose to best stay connected. Despite the myriad of telecommunication options available to Kentuckians, economic challenges may make it difficult for some to remain connected to family, employers and healthcare providers. To help low-income Kentuckians stay connected, the Link-up and Lifeline (not to be confused with a medical alert program with a similar name) programs may help.

  • COLUMN: Children were kept in the dark during 9/11

    The memory of 9/11 is still fresh in the minds of many, even after 10 years. But for those minds that never really understood what happened, the confusion of that day is as memorable as the tragedy itself.
    On Sept. 11, 2001, I woke up early to prepare for the day ahead. I don’t remember what I ate, what I wore or any conversations I had. I do remember it was a Tuesday and I was in the 7th grade. Tuesdays were my dad’s days to come pick me up – my favorite day of the week.

  • COLUMN: Fear was a daily factor after the twin towers fell

     I was on an early morning goose hunt with my husband and a friend in Boston, Ky., on  Sept. 11, 2001.
    After our hunt, I walked to pick up our truck while the guys gathered decoys. When I got in the truck the radio was on and reports of the attacks were being reported.

  • COLUMN: Our country came together after 9/11 attacks

    As a child whose father was on duty at Fort Knox when President John F. Kennedy was shot, my parents would often comment, “I’ll always remember where I was when Kennedy was shot.” Somehow as a young person, I thought that was just my parents and probably nothing I would ever experience. But then it happened.
    Desert Storm, President Reagan was shot, and then 9-11. Yes, I remember all those days, where I was, how I felt and how we reacted.

  • COLUMN: Still wondering: How do you cover an American tragedy?

    Sept. 11, 2001, was a Tuesday.
    Just like every Tuesday for the past 10 years (and more than 100 years before that) the staff of The LaRue County Herald News was putting together the Wednesday paper.
    The Sept. 12 paper was an informative issue with stories about the murder of a veteran in Upton, a teen injured in a car crash, Upton residents in an uproar when an adult bookstore “The Lion’s Den” opened, the death of legendary sports commentator Cawood Ledford and youth league soccer.